What is so special about working in postpartum??? - page 3

...Because I cannot get a job in this specialty to save my life! I rarely see any job postings for PP in my area and when I do they want experience ofcourse. I've spoken to a few PP nurses and they... Read More

  1. Visit  PinkNBlue profile page
    1
    Quote from crazy&cuteRN
    Update : just got off orientation and I love this job. I look forward to going to work every day . Somedays are crazy busy but I love it all....
    Knew you would It's the best!
    prnqday likes this.
  2. Visit  SE_BSN_RN profile page
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    I just finished my BSN and am waiting to take my boards. I just applied to the hospital where I had my 3 boys, for a PP position that hires new grads. (I am an LPN with 6 years LTC/ 1 year HHC.)

    I am going to call the HR and find out who the hiring manager is. Any hints/tips on interviewing, especially since I haven't passed my boards yet? Would it seem to pushy to go to the hiring manager? I'd also like to cross train in L&D, should I mention that, also?
  3. Visit  seemerun profile page
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    So glad you got on! I was going to pipe in and say there's really nothing special about PP. Except for the fact that it is low turnover so not as many openings. Plus, it's a fairly "desireable" unit so when the openings do come up there's lots of competition. But I am glad you there! I FINALLY started L&D about six months after years of trying and I love it too. It's intense, I feel like a new grad all over again and there is just so so much to learn. But I look forward to being there and I don't have that I don't want to go to work tonight" like I used to. :-)
  4. Visit  Happie2bRN profile page
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    I am a new RN graduate and is set to begin working on a PP/Peds unit. I'm excited and nervous at the same time. I loved working on the PP floor during clinical. I have read under other discussion topics that postpartum nursing is boring and made for nurses who's ready to retire. With that being said, anxiety arises for me because I want plenty of experience such as starting IVs, caths, and so far. Can anyone tell me about their experience as a PP nurse? Thanks in advance!
  5. Visit  PinkNBlue profile page
    2
    Happie2bRN- People who say that PP is for nurses that are ready to retire have either worked in PP ages ago, where nurses rocked babies in the nursery and that was the extent of their care, or they've never worked in PP and are assuming based on the nurses who've only worked PP ages ago.

    I've worked PP for 8 years; 1.5 as a nurse and in those 1.5 years, I've had PLENTY of opportunities to use the skills I acquired in nursing school. These days, people who are having babies aren't all healthy. Everyone seems to have comorbidities that complicate their pregnancy and recovery (ie blood pressure issues, diabetes issues etc). You will gain much experience with catheters, IVs etc. You just have to be proactive and when someone needs a catheter placed, volunteer. I place catheters more than IVs but they're both prevalent. Heck, I've had a patient with a PICC line on hyperal and lipids who was an antepartum patient with hyperemesis. We've had patients that we've had to place NG tubes. It's not the same PP some are used to. It's a lot of education as well... breastfeeding takes up a ton of time, teaching new moms.

    The one truth is retirement.... you'll probably love it so much, you'll want to retire there and go nowhere else :-) Do what you want to do and don't let others deter you. Good luck!!
    iPink and prnqday like this.
  6. Visit  Happie2bRN profile page
    0
    Thanks PinkNBlue I really needed to hear that. I'm excited about starting my career as a nurse and now looking forward to working PP. Will update on how it's going.
  7. Visit  PinkNBlue profile page
    0
    Quote from Happie2bRN
    Thanks PinkNBlue I really needed to hear that. I'm excited about starting my career as a nurse and now looking forward to working PP. Will update on how it's going.
    Please do! And best of luck to you. :-)
  8. Visit  prnqday profile page
    0
    Well said PinkNBlue. I place IV's, foley's, perform EKG's, hang blood, give insulin, and etc on postpartum. It is not the cushy job others make it out to be. Some days are so busy and hecked. However, I wouldn't trade it for anything else. I love my job!
  9. Visit  PinkNBlue profile page
    0
    Quote from crazy&cuteRN
    Well said PinkNBlue. I place IV's, foley's, perform EKG's, hang blood, give insulin, and etc on postpartum. It is not the cushy job others make it out to be. Some days are so busy and hecked. However, I wouldn't trade it for anything else. I love my job!
    Same! Even if it's a crazy night, the next day you feel refreshed and ready to take on another day. I usually try to volunteer to take the blood transfusions, the mag patients or higher acuity so I keep up with experience. But believe me, there's usually plenty to go around. 😉
  10. Visit  passionflower profile page
    1
    It's hard to get a job in postpartum because nurses who are on their way out of nursing hold on to those jobs for dear life. Most experienced nurses who have been around the block realize that even on their worse day in postpartum - and there can be busy days there, they don't compare to their worse days on other units such as L + D, ER, med/surg/tele or ICU.
    I went there for teaching experience but unfortunately felt like a waitress on most days. For those that love it they are very lucky to have found their niche because it isn't a bad unit to be on if that is what you like.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  11. Visit  PeepnBiscuitsRN profile page
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    You already said it- there's very little turnover. I work with some nurses who have worked in the birth center for going on 36 years now. It's their niche too.

    Though I wonder- and please don't take this wrong, how one can say that any field is their niche until they've worked it? You like to teach, and yes, there is definitely teaching to be done in OB. But when I worked in cardiac, there was teaching too- different kind of teaching, but still there was a TON of stuff to teach. Many of the nurses who have worked in OB have said they get these new grads, or nurses with about one year of experience who say that OB is their dream job, that this is what they're meant to do- and a month or so later they quit because it's not the fairy tale they thought it was. I know you said that you're not about "babies are so cute" and all, and that's good because while OB is generally happy and good, there's a lot of ugly on that unit too- babies getting taken from mom from CPS, babies born to 16 year olds who dress them up 6 or 8 times an hour like a dolly and then whine that the baby is crying and they're trying to sleep/watch cartoons/talk on their phone and while I'm at it- change the baby's diaper. Or the uber rich people with 46 page birth plans that give you the death stare if you pick their baby up.

    It's a popular field, I hope you get your foot in the door. Persist and give the managers good reasons why you're interested in it.
  12. Visit  PeepnBiscuitsRN profile page
    0
    Whoops. Just saw you're already in the field. Awesome! Have fun with it!
  13. Visit  dansamy profile page
    0
    I love pp. That's where I work my overtime. I'm night shift though, so it's relatively quiet.

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