what happens if both fallopian tubes are removed?

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    what happens if both fallopian tubes are removed? Is conception still possible?

    because as I know, ovaries are attached to fallopian tubes so if both the fallopian tubes are removed, would the ovaries be removed too?? or will they be attached directly to the uterus?

    And If the fallopian tubes are removed and ovaries are left in place, would the woman still ovulate and be pregnant? and menstruate?


    And what if the ovaries are the ones removed? I assume there'll ne no ovulation so pregnancy will not be possible anymore, am I right?


    Im just really confused and I need all the help I can get.. Thank you soo much! Please do explain why or why not...
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  3. 9 Comments so far...

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    From my understanding, usually if there is reason to remove the fallopian tube, they may remove the ovary as well. If there were a situation where both fallopian tubes were removed but ovaries remained, the person would not be able to get pregnant unless they tried artificial methods such as IVF. With ovaries in place, the person would still cycle and menstruate but the egg would be released into the abdominal cavity and be reabsorbed by the body rather than into the fallopian tube and into the uterus.

    Now thinking about it more, I suppose an ectopic pregnancy might occur if the egg was released into the abdomen and the sperm traveled through the tubal ostia into the abdomen as well but my guess is the ostia is so scarred over from removal of the fallopian tube that sperm would not reach it.
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    Maybe these will help. You really need to speak to your doctor if this is information needed for personal reasons....we're not allowed to give medical advice on this site....

    http://www.healthline.com/galeconten...oophorectomy-1

    http://www.surgeryencyclopedia.com/P...horectomy.html

    salpingectomy= removal of fallopian tube/s
    oophorectomy= removal of ovary/s they're not always done together. Sometimes the ovary is spared. It depends on the individual circumstances
    eagle78 and Esme12 like this.
  6. 0
    Short answers:
    1) If both fallopian tubes & ovaries are removed, you hit menopause (though the uterus does secrete some hormones, but I won't go there). This procedure is called a salpingo-oophorectomy.
    2) If you ONLY removed the uterus (in a partial or full operation), this is called a partial hysterectomy, or a full hysterectomy, respectively. The cervix is usually left behind.
    3) If all three are removed, then you have what is called a hysterosalpingooophorectomy (blah!). Then you hit menopause.
    4) If you leave the ovaries in and remove the fallopian tubes, you won't go into menopause, but may need top up HRT, depending upon how your ovaries work afterwards.
    5) Your body can secrete enough hormones with just one ovary and/or fallopian tube left, even if the other one is removed (ie: due to cancer).
    6) You cannot get pregnant if you remove the uterus and ovaries and fallopian tubes. You can't get pregnant if you just remove the ovaries (no hormones & eggs left). You can't get pregnant if you have no ovaries and fallopian tubes, but the uterus is left (sometimes the uterus if left, cos if u remove it when u dont' have to, the bladder drops down and this causes problems such as urinary leakage and sometimes bowel incontinence). It is rare a surgeon would remove the ovaries and uterus, and leave the fallopian tubes.
    HOWEVER,I have heard of women who have their ovaries removed, and they have already secreted eggs into their fallopian tube which migrates down to the uterus and pregnancy has resulted.
    Why do you ask?
    Does this help??
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    thank you sooooooo much!!!! very informative!!!!!!!
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    and through IVF and an egg donor.....If you have a uterus you can carry a pregnancy and get pregnant with the assistance of injectable hormones.
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    Quote from RFRN
    From my understanding, usually if there is reason to remove the fallopian tube, they may remove the ovary as well. If there were a situation where both fallopian tubes were removed but ovaries remained, the person would not be able to get pregnant unless they tried artificial methods such as IVF. With ovaries in place, the person would still cycle and menstruate but the egg would be released into the abdominal cavity and be reabsorbed by the body rather than into the fallopian tube and into the uterus.

    Now thinking about it more, I suppose an ectopic pregnancy might occur if the egg was released into the abdomen and the sperm traveled through the tubal ostia into the abdomen as well but my guess is the ostia is so scarred over from removal of the fallopian tube that sperm would not reach it.
    I disagree with this. An ectopic pregnancy is also called a tubal pregnancy....no tubes, no ectopic. An egg could not be fertilized with no tubes present; the sperm cannot get to the egg. An egg could not/would not randomly implant in the abdomen somewhere?
  10. 5
    Quote from cherrybreeze
    I disagree with this. An ectopic pregnancy is also called a tubal pregnancy....no tubes, no ectopic. An egg could not be fertilized with no tubes present; the sperm cannot get to the egg. An egg could not/would not randomly implant in the abdomen somewhere?
    Ectopic pregnancies do not just occur in the fallopian tubes - it's any pregnancy that occurs outside the uterus.
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    Quote from cherrybreeze
    I disagree with this. An ectopic pregnancy is also called a tubal pregnancy....no tubes, no ectopic. An egg could not be fertilized with no tubes present; the sperm cannot get to the egg. An egg could not/would not randomly implant in the abdomen somewhere?
    sometimes it does, and the fertilized egg is hanging out in the abdominal cavity growing which is very very bad
    carolmaccas66 and fromtheseaRN like this.
  12. 0
    There was a case--last year?--of a woman with an abdominal ectopic pregnancy carried to term. Very rare and very dangerous. Ah.
    And oooh, via wiki:
    There have been cases where ectopic pregnancy lasted many months and ended in a live baby delivered by laparotomy.
    In July 1999, Lori Dalton gave birth by Cesarean Section in Ogden, Utah, USA to a healthy baby girl who had developed outside of the uterus. Previous ultrasounds had not discovered the problem. "Sage Dalton's delivery was slated as a routine Cesarean birth at Ogden Regional Medical Center in Utah. When Dr. Naisbitt performed Lori’s Cesarean, he was astonished to find Sage within the amniotic membrane outside the womb."[27] " But what makes this case so rare is that not only did mother and baby survive-- they're both in perfect health. John Dalton (the father) took home video inside the delivery room. Saige came out doing extremely well because even though she had been implanted outside the womb, a rich blood supply from a benign fibrous tumor along the outer uterus wall had nourished her with a rich source of blood."[28]
    On 19 April 2008 an English woman, Jayne Jones (age 37) who had an ectopic pregnancy attached to the omentum, the fatty covering of her large bowel, gave birth. The baby, Billy Jones was delivered by a laparotomy at 28 weeks gestation. The surgery, the first of its kind to be performed in the UK, was successful, and both mother and baby survived.[29]
    On May 29, 2008 an Australian woman, Meera Thangarajah (age 34), who had an ectopic pregnancy in the ovary, gave birth to a healthy full term 6 pound 3 ounce (2.8 kg) baby girl, Durga, via Caesarean section. She had no problems or complications during the 38-week pregnancy.[30][31]
    The case of Olivia, Mary and Ronan had an extrauterine fetus (Ronan) and intrauterine twins. All three survived. The intrauterine twins were taken out first.[32]


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