Voluntary C-Sections? - page 2

I wonder if doctor's will do a c-section at the patient's request? I just wonder, because with each of my children I have had to have pretty good episiotomies (tore pretty bad with the one I had at... Read More

  1. by   Jo Dirt
    I know I'm a major whiner, but I just know the thought of my butt getting torn up again gives me the creeps. I'm not wanting a c-section because I'm some kind of spoiled princess who thinks because I want I can have it my way like Burger King.
    The concern is real to me and if this kid is as big as I am afraid it is I can't bear the thought of pushing it out. My first weighed 6pds 3oz and they said I needed a c-section but as they were preparing the OR here she came out and if it hadn't been for the doctor's quick action with the episiotomy I would have been torn to pieces. I judt don't have the good skin elasticity of some women, I guess.
    I know what you mean about pushing, though, it gets to a certain point where it is involuntary and no amount of self control will help.
  2. by   judyblueeyes
    Do talk to your Doc.

    If you think a C/S is right for you, go for it!


    Nurses tend to advocate for the patient... unless the pt wants something they don't approve of (such as a C/S). Don't let others decide what is right for you.
  3. by   LPN0608
    I had a C-section c my daughter. Loved it and I hope I never have to push if I decide to have another child. I've heard a lot of women complain about the recovery time but I had no problem. Asked to go home after 1.5 days and was cooking dinner that night . Was back to work waiting on tables and carrying trays(AMA) 3 weeks later. Needed the money then. Good luck.
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Patient advocacy in the labor and delivery setting requires advocating for TWO patients at a time, mom AND baby. In this light, I can't advocate for non-medical strictly elective surgery in a person who has not demonstrated medical need as determined by her health care provider. My posts stand.

    And nobody here is deciding what is right for this OP. That would be giving medical advice. She has been (rightfully) directed to see her doctor.

    Good luck to the OP.
  5. by   KellNY
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Patient advocacy in the labor and delivery setting requires advocating for TWO patients at a time, mom AND baby. In this light, I can't advocate for non-medical strictly elective surgery in a person who has not demonstrated medical need as determined by her health care provider. My posts stand.

    And nobody here is deciding what is right for this OP. That would be giving medical advice. She has been (rightfully) directed to see her doctor.

    Good luck to the OP.
    Thank you! I did not appreciate the implication that because I was giving medical facts and urging the OP to consider ALL aspects that I was not being an advocate for that Pt.

    There's something called INFORMED consent, which IMO is so much a part of Pt advocacy.
  6. by   CEG
    I also wouldn't advocate for a cheeseburger for a heart attack patient. Sure, it's what the patient wants, it won't cause him any problems today, and maybe the doctor will allow it, insurance will pay for it, but is it what is best for the patient? Or is the long term outlook going to be better for the man and his heart if he eats something else that isn't exactly what he wanted.
  7. by   MamaMadge
    I gave birth to twins vaginally, a 9 lb. 8 oz son vaginally, then had to have a cesarean for my little peanut 34weeker because of fetal intol. to labor and transverse lie. I would take the pain of vaginal birth any day over a cesarean recovery. It is major abdominal surgery and not to be taken lightly. As the other posters suggested, talk it over with your care provider, become as informed as possible and then make your decision. I wish you the best of luck and a healthy baby!
  8. by   beanie29
    I had a c/s with my first and a vbac with my second. I had no complications with my c/s and a 2nd degree tear with my vbac.. and the vaginal birth was a walk in the park compared to the c/s. You're talking major abdominal surgery here.
    I would recommend doing as much research as possible into both options. And find a midwife or OB who isn't of the old-fashioned episiotomy mindset.. it also helps to try different positions when pushing, which can open the pelvic outlet.

    After my vaginal birth, I was able to focus on my baby and establish breastfeeding. It was just such a better experience for so many reasons.

    Also, from the research I've done, a tear will heal much faster than an episiotomy.. so that's something to look into if it concerns you. There are also many things you can do to prevent tearing- perineal massage, hot compresses, etc.
    Last edit by beanie29 on Feb 2, '07
  9. by   Spidey's mom
    I think everyone's experiences are unique to them and all this is anecdotal regarding pain in labor and pain with cesarean.

    This is a frequent subject here on allnurses too - so I'll keep my anecdote short and sweet.

    I had three vaginal deliveries, no tears and then one cesarean and would take the cesarean over labor any time.

    My recovery from surgery was not difficult. I breastfed without problems. I was at my husband's high school reunion a week later.

    I also work in ob . . . some of the women recover so quickly after surgery and need so little pain meds that sometimes I have to wonder if all the nerve endings in their abdomen were cut. Others you have to really work with to motivate them to sit on the side of the bed and dangle.

    I completely understand the fear of an experience you didn't like - don't feel bad about worrying about it.

    My cesarean was an emergency - I'm just grateful my son is ok.

    steph

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