Video cameras banned in L&D - page 3

The hospital where I work recently banned videotaping in the labor & delivery suite. There's a big sign on the entrance door to the unit. The technician who told me about it believed that the... Read More

  1. by   vamedic4
    While I understand (somewhat) the legal ramifications of NOT having video in L/D...I would have to disagree with what some of you have said.
    First off, this is a special time in the life of mom, dad, extended family. IT'S A DAY THEY'LL NEVER FORGET. So they want some video of it?? SO?
    Now this begs the question...when is it okay to begin taping?? What exactly to get on tape??

    Personally I think that filming mom in her "nether" regions to be inappropriate. I'm sure no mom to be wants to relive her baby's birth with her legs spread for the world to see. But again, that's not YOUR call to make, it's mom's call. You infringe upon her rights when you disallow this type of filming. Perhaps having dad film from the waist up or "standing" at the waist (as opposed to at her feet looking up) would be a better option. This way you can still see baby as he/she comes out but you don't get the full on XXX rated version.

    Oh, yeah...and if it's mom or mother in law that wants to be there...okay, no problem. But keep your brother in law out of the delivery room for cryin' out loud. We don't need a 3 ring circus during the event, and it sounds as if you guys have seen plenty of that!

    While I understand your post about not wanting pics taken during resuscitative efforts, it is unfortunately for some parents the only time their babies will be alive. Would I personally want pictures of my newborn who is now no longer with us during your valiant struggle to save his life? Perhaps, perhaps not..but I'm sorry, that's not your choice to make.

    The problem then becomes the parents and their need to "blame" someone for the poor outcome of the birth. "Someone must have done something wrong" is, of course, the attitude of many whose delivery outcome was ..less than ideal. And the use of lawsuits, especially in L/D cases makes sick.

    It's a sad, sad world we live in that people would alter video in order to make it look like someone did something to "cause" a bad outcome during a delivery, and an even sadder fact of life that this is one of the reasons that video cameras have been banned. It make me sick just to think about it.

    Bottom line though, is that hospital policies are just that, policies. Are you going to kick mom out of there just because she wants a few pictures...I think not. Discretion is in order on both sides of the coin.
    I do agree with having staff consent to having themselves on video, it's only fair.

    From my own personal experience, my wife had 2 C sections (yaaay) so I didn't get any inappropriate pics...and our video cam didn't work anyway. Our second son came out (actually got a pic of him as he's still in her belly, and then right as his head is coming out...and they are awesome!! I'll have to post them sometime. He then got sent to the NICU and all was well (mom was a high risk birth...hyperemesis...TPN thru a picc line...other issues)...it was then that all hell broke loose. I was holding him and putting him down in his NICU bed when he coughed up some amniotic fluid...and aspirated some.
    NICU staff did a superb job of suctioning/bagging and after a little bipap he was good to go.
    Hats off to NICU staff, and the L/D staff who were incredible as well. You really are special people with special jobs. Never forget that. You all have my gratitude for the job that you do. :wink2:

    vamedic4
    It's not 150 degrees here anymore!!!
    Last edit by vamedic4 on Sep 14, '06
  2. by   bagladyrn
    I agree that parents are entitled to film the birth from whatever angle they choose, though not sure they are really thinking this through ahead of time. I still think though that I should have a choice of whether or not I am being filmed.
    During resusitations, cameras have NO place. What we are doing is more important than "move your hands so I can get a picture" (Have actually heard this). I have had family members try to shove their way in to the warmer to get their shots. No, I don't have time to "politely" explain when this is going on, though I try to do so afterward. How do you think it looks to nonmedical people viewing the shot of me jumping on the bed (I'm short) to shove my hand into mom's belly for suprapubic pressure to help deliver a badly stuck shoulder distocia? On the other hand, I have paused in what was obviously going to be futile treatment in the nsy to get one shot of daddy's hands and face cradling an infant while still alive, knowing it would be all they had, before the infant was transported.
  3. by   workingforskies
    I have to agree with VAMEDIC4 on this. Too many people here are putting their beliefs ahead of their patients which goes against what we are all about.


    I too have been in situations where I have been filmed. I really don't care personally. For those here don't like to be video taped, you better stay at home and never leave the house. You do know that whenever you go to a gas station, bank or retail store you are going to be on tape? George Orwell was so right. Just about 20 years off on his timing.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    For those here don't like to be video taped, you better stay at home and never leave the house. You do know that whenever you go to a gas station, bank or retail store you are going to be on tape?
    There is a huge difference between getting filmed while caring for pts. and getting filmed while pumping for gas
  5. by   babyktchr
    Quote from vamedic4
    While I understand (somewhat) the legal ramifications of NOT having video in L/D...I would have to disagree with what some of you have said.
    First off, this is a special time in the life of mom, dad, extended family. IT'S A DAY THEY'LL NEVER FORGET. So they want some video of it?? SO?
    Now this begs the question...when is it okay to begin taping?? What exactly to get on tape??

    Personally I think that filming mom in her "nether" regions to be inappropriate. I'm sure no mom to be wants to relive her baby's birth with her legs spread for the world to see. But again, that's not YOUR call to make, it's mom's call. You infringe upon her rights when you disallow this type of filming. Perhaps having dad film from the waist up or "standing" at the waist (as opposed to at her feet looking up) would be a better option. This way you can still see baby as he/she comes out but you don't get the full on XXX rated version.

    Oh, yeah...and if it's mom or mother in law that wants to be there...okay, no problem. But keep your brother in law out of the delivery room for cryin' out loud. We don't need a 3 ring circus during the event, and it sounds as if you guys have seen plenty of that!

    While I understand your post about not wanting pics taken during resuscitative efforts, it is unfortunately for some parents the only time their babies will be alive. Would I personally want pictures of my newborn who is now no longer with us during your valiant struggle to save his life? Perhaps, perhaps not..but I'm sorry, that's not your choice to make.

    The problem then becomes the parents and their need to "blame" someone for the poor outcome of the birth. "Someone must have done something wrong" is, of course, the attitude of many whose delivery outcome was ..less than ideal. And the use of lawsuits, especially in L/D cases makes sick.

    It's a sad, sad world we live in that people would alter video in order to make it look like someone did something to "cause" a bad outcome during a delivery, and an even sadder fact of life that this is one of the reasons that video cameras have been banned. It make me sick just to think about it.

    Bottom line though, is that hospital policies are just that, policies. Are you going to kick mom out of there just because she wants a few pictures...I think not. Discretion is in order on both sides of the coin.
    I do agree with having staff consent to having themselves on video, it's only fair.

    From my own personal experience, my wife had 2 C sections (yaaay) so I didn't get any inappropriate pics...and our video cam didn't work anyway. Our second son came out (actually got a pic of him as he's still in her belly, and then right as his head is coming out...and they are awesome!! I'll have to post them sometime. He then got sent to the NICU and all was well (mom was a high risk birth...hyperemesis...TPN thru a picc line...other issues)...it was then that all hell broke loose. I was holding him and putting him down in his NICU bed when he coughed up some amniotic fluid...and aspirated some.
    NICU staff did a superb job of suctioning/bagging and after a little bipap he was good to go.
    Hats off to NICU staff, and the L/D staff who were incredible as well. You really are special people with special jobs. Never forget that. You all have my gratitude for the job that you do. :wink2:

    vamedic4
    It's not 150 degrees here anymore!!!
    I really have no problem with anything that you have said. Yes, it is an experience that no mom or dad will ever forget. (unforunately, there are a good percentage now that just don't care either way). Medicine, however, has become more of a legal issue than that of the care of a patient. If you really look at it, medicine is no longer dictated by the physician, but by insurance companies and lawyers. You can't do anything without the ever present scrutiny of the the legal community, who ADVERTISE to people what to look for in your child's labor experience so you can get MONEY DAMAGES. Thus..policies have been born to protect the medical community. It is a damn shame that it has to be this way. I make every effort to accomodate a patient wish. But I WILL NOT let you photograph a baby being resusitated. Period. Not when my butt is on the line when you know the pictures and video will be used against me when the parents take the whole place to court. (and it definitely happens) I am sure one of the first questions asked by the lawyer is.....DO YOU HAVE PICTURES OR VIDEO OF THE BIRTH.

    I feel for the parents. Really I do. The birth of a child is precious. It should be treated as such. But not with the entire family and friends at the bedside, eating cheetos like they are watching a football game. Just my own thought.
  6. by   Alixandra
    I had 2 people in the room other than myself and the doc/nurses. My mom and my husband at the time, my son's daddy. I was worried that my mIL would want in to watch since she and SIL and BIL were going to be there when I was induced. I told my husband to tell her she was not going to be in the room when I gave birth. I knew SIL and BIL didn't want to be in the room when I had him so that wasn't an issue. My husband told my MIL this and she said, and I quote "Of course I'm not going to be in there when she has him, why would I want to see that?" and you could tell she was totally grossed out at the concept of watching me give birth. She was an ICU nurse at that point for over 15 years so it wasn't the 'ick' factor(blood, fluid, possible poop, and all that great stuff) of me giving birth. It was the fact that she didn't want to see me and my nether regions and I don't blame her.
    I would not want to be video taped giving birth, but we do have a few still shots of my son on the warmer right after he was born. He had no complications and no one got in the nurse's or doctor's way. The only shot of me are holding him for the first time and right before discharge. I hate the picture of me holding him for the first time, I look drugged and am super pale.
    Sadly, this has had to happen due to everyone wanting to sue everybody amd it's sad for those who want a video of their birth. Not that I'm sure why you would want that. No one wants to see you give birth. To me filming a birth is like filming a funeral(yes I have been at funerals that people have taped and taken still pics of the body, this was a 94 yr old who was deceased, not a baby or child which I can almost understand), I mean when are you going to actually watch that and no one else wants to see it.

    Taryn
  7. by   dawngloves
    Quote from vamedic4
    While I understand your post about not wanting pics taken during resuscitative efforts, it is unfortunately for some parents the only time their babies will be alive. Would I personally want pictures of my newborn who is now no longer with us during your valiant struggle to save his life? Perhaps, perhaps not..but I'm sorry, that's not your choice to make.
    Acutally, if we are resusitating a baby, the baby is not alive. :uhoh21: And yes it is my choice if I want to be photographed no matter what I am doing and where.
  8. by   dlsgroovymom
    kguyf
    Last edit by dlsgroovymom on Sep 24, '06
  9. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from vamedic4
    While I understand (somewhat) the legal ramifications of NOT having video in L/D...I would have to disagree with what some of you have said.
    First off, this is a special time in the life of mom, dad, extended family. IT'S A DAY THEY'LL NEVER FORGET. So they want some video of it?? SO?

    Bottom line though, is that hospital policies are just that, policies. Are you going to kick mom out of there just because she wants a few pictures...I think not. Discretion is in order on both sides of the coin.
    I do agree with having staff consent to having themselves on video, it's only fair.
    It is an event that you will never forget.....so why do you need it on tape?????

    What is so wrong with us that we have to photograph and document every little thing in our life? It seems to be a trend that we have shelved our memory in deference to technology.

    I'm sorry, but people have gone a bit too far with this, let's photograph every little thing and video every little thing.

    One of friends had a wedding with NO professional photography and banned videocams from it (did permit candid snaps by guests). Some of her family members were ticked. She wanted a nice comfortable warm wedding without the all the formal fuss.

    It survives as the best wedding (this from someone, who has been a bridesmaid for six weddings) that I have ever been to, and one of the nicer wedding albums.

    I remember all the wonderful moments in my life, in technicolor. My memory cannot be topped by a videotape.

    I can see where if a crucial family member cannot be there (Dad or second Mom), video might be of importance.

    You ask if they would kick mom out....mom (or dad) should ask ahead of time if the video cameras are permitted. Videos are a privilege not a right or a necessity. And in case of an Emergency delivery, the videocamera is not an "emergency" piece of equipment.
    Last edit by caroladybelle on Sep 15, '06
  10. by   mollyaqua
    I work in a labor and delivery unit that does not allow video taping of the birth. I have seen rare exceptions, usually for military families, when the dad is deployed.

    Our instructions to the family are that video cameras are to be turned off when the physician enters the room and may be turned on when the baby's toes are "out". We also request that no photos be taken or video taping be done during any resucitative efforts. I've been in some ugly situations when someone was taking flash photo after flash photo while Skilled But Very Grumpy Neonatologist was attempting to intubate. Ugly. I've also been asked to stop my bagging efforts so the father could pick a pubic hair off the baby's cheek before he took photos. They are excited and just don't get it.

    We tell patients that the camera must be in their hands during filming--no surreptitious videotaping from cameras that have been set on a shelf etc. We also do not allow tripods at any time. We have had several instances of people not following this rule and setting the camera's up right in front of the privacy curtain. Unsuspecting nurse comes in, tramples the tripod and the hospital finds itself in the position of reimbursing (YES!) the family for the cost of the ruined camera. Tripods were done away with once and for all when a nurse tripped over one and broke her arm.

    I think that when the dad is busy videotaping he is totally removed from the intimacy and miracle of the birth. Banning videotaping encourages him to really be mom's coach and support person, not the sidelines recorder.

    I use every bit of knowledge and strength and wits that I possess during a difficult delivery, but I am thankful that the camera is not on me. The job is stressful enough without having a tape to Monday Morning Quarterback review after.
  11. by   tinyscrafts
    I'm really amazed at the judgementalness of most of these posts. it's up to the parents to decide. not nurses. Being a very modest person. I was pretty surprised to find out that i have full crotch shot video of dd1 being born. I wouldn't let anything happen to that tape. I love having it and found it very educational and clarifying as to what happened when/who did what. I was a bit out of it at the time, It's amazing. no one else needs to see it but that's my choice.

    I'd never give birth anywhere that dared to try to take that from me. grrrr!
  12. by   vamedic4
    Quote from dawngloves
    Acutally, if we are resusitating a baby, the baby is not alive. :uhoh21: And yes it is my choice if I want to be photographed no matter what I am doing and where.

    Okay, clarification time again. As I said in my post, some people have a morbid need to have pictures of their now deceased baby during your valiant struggle to save his life. They don't want YOUR picture, you just get in the way.
    I'm not saying this to offend you, but if you've never been a parent in this particular situation, you have no "true" understanding of it, try as you might.

    And no, it's not your choice to be photographed only when and where you want. To think so, especially nowadays, is absolutely ridiculous. You're photographed at the bank, ATM, grocery store, even at the local amusement park.
    ------------------------------------------------------
    "You ask if they would kick mom out....mom (or dad) should ask ahead of time if the video cameras are permitted. Videos are a privilege not a right or a necessity. And in case of an Emergency delivery, the videocamera is not an "emergency" piece of equipment."---


    Sure, they should ask ahead of time, and this can be done well in advance of the actual delivery. As I stated, discretion is in order on BOTH sides of the coin. You want to be hypervigilant and alienate the pregnant community with your stance, by all means go ahead.

    And in the case of an emergency delivery...there's nothing wrong with video or pictures as long as they don't intrude in the lifesaving measures. We're not dealing with nosy reporters looking for good newsreel to sell to ABC, we're dealing with parents who sometimes don't fully understand the gravity of the situation at hand. And again, they're taping or getting pictures of a significant event in their lives, one they perhaps won't WANT to remember, or perhaps they will. If they're not in the way..leave 'em alone.


    vamedic4
    lighten up, geez.
  13. by   rn/writer
    And no, it's not your choice to be photographed only when and where you want. To think so, especially nowadays, is absolutely ridiculous. You're photographed at the bank, ATM, grocery store, even at the local amusement park.
    I'm not sure if this is your statement vamedic4, but I'd like to respond. Yes, there are cameras almost everywhere in places we think of as being in the public domain.

    Cameras in a delivery room, however, seem to be the exception rather than the rule so they aren't a "given" the way the other ones are.

    There is a need to balance the family's desire to preserve special moments with the staff's desire to be able to concentrate on what they are doing without distraction or fear.

    The details should be discussed well before the delivery. The more restricted the policy, the earlier it should be brought up so parents have the option of changing docs if they can't live with the limitations.

    Common sense, courtesy, and respect on everyone's part could go a long way toward arriving at a mutually satisfactory solution. But I suppose that's the underutilized option in a lot of situations.
    Last edit by rn/writer on Sep 18, '06

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