Umbilical clamp cutter

  1. One of the hospitals in my region is looking for a different kind of umbilical clamp cutter. They are using the hole you would normally guide the clamp cutter through to guide and secure transponders with. As a result they can not cut the clamp in the usual fashion. I have done a bit of searching, but did not find an alternative for them yet. Any great ideas?

    Marijke
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   babyktchr
    We have the same kind of transponders it sounds like...and we use the same cutter except we now cut on the side of the clamp...that is how the rep showed us. The company provided us with "their" clamp, but the old ones that we used worked just fine. I don't know the company or anything...just thought I would share.
  4. by   fiestynurse
    You can also use a safety pin and pop those things off where they clamp down. You don't need a clamp cutter.
  5. by   webbiedebbie
    I am working telephone triage now, and the other night I received a call from someone in Germany. They were discharged with the clamp still on! He said no one gave them instructions on cord care! The wife said they were supposed to go back to the hospital to have the clamp removed, but they were'nt told when to do that. I suspect the cord will fall off with the clip still attached.
  6. by   Jerico
    Quote from webbiedebbie
    I am working telephone triage now, and the other night I received a call from someone in Germany. They were discharged with the clamp still on! He said no one gave them instructions on cord care! The wife said they were supposed to go back to the hospital to have the clamp removed, but they were'nt told when to do that. I suspect the cord will fall off with the clip still attached.
    This happened to me with my second child. They sent the clamp home ON.
    I was curious - but figured since it had been a while (10 years) it was a "new standard" (I wasn't a nurse at the time, either).

    Well, my son's bellybutton herniated - and we had to have it fixed. Doc said the clamp "was probably" an issue in it.
    :angryfire
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    The safety pin trick is great when a clamp cutter is not available. BUT ---if a person goes home (unfortunately), with a baby's clamp on. I request they come in to have it removed. I feel I should assess the cord condition, if this was overlooked, anyhow. Cord clamp removal is on our checklist of things to check prior to d/c (like birth certificate, car seat, etc) but it can be missed. We are human.

    However, I strongly feel It's best to ask folks to COME IN and have it removed when this happens.
  8. by   dawngloves
    We use something that looks like needle nose pliers, but are sharp. It has a clear cover on the end to protect the baby.You can cut the clip part so it pops right open. I have no idea who makes them.Sorry.
  9. by   Marijke
    Thanks guys:kiss

    Marijke
  10. by   prmenrs
    I have left the clamp on when I've d/c'd a baby sometimes a little less than 24 hrs old, or I just felt the cord was too "soft" to cut the clamp off yet. They go to the ped w/in a few days, I figure they can deal w/it there.

    Instructions? Keep it clean and dry, don't put anything on it at all, call MD if red, any drainage or foul odor.

    We put the "lo-jacks" on the baby's ankle, so no interference w/cord clamps. And I've done that safety pin trick for years! Easier that trying to find the dang cord clamp cutter!
  11. by   lisamct
    Can someone clarify for me, are you talking about the little plastic clamps that go on the cord at birth?
    If so we always send our babies home with them still on and they stay on until the naturally fall off with the cord. Ive never heard of any problems with doing it this way, as, as far as I know its pretty standard practice across the UK.
    Can someone fill me in?
  12. by   dawngloves
    Quote from lisamct
    Can someone clarify for me, are you talking about the little plastic clamps that go on the cord at birth?
    If so we always send our babies home with them still on and they stay on until the naturally fall off with the cord. Ive never heard of any problems with doing it this way, as, as far as I know its pretty standard practice across the UK.
    Can someone fill me in?
    I can't imagine how this would be a problem, unless it was that the diapers don't fit properly. A pp mentioned an umbilical hernia. I have no idea how a cord clamp could cause that.

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