They did a c-section without anesthesia - page 6

The pt had an epidural, but it didn't do the trick. We don't have in-house anesthesia, and it took 20 minutes to get to the hospital. meanwhile there were heart tones in the toilet and the baby... Read More

  1. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from heartICU
    Patient had an epidural yet no IV access? Hmmm...something fishy here.
    We can't do an epidural w/o IV access . . .. maybe the access was lost . . . . still it only take a few seconds to start a new IV.

    More info is definitely needed . .

    steph
  2. by   jrussole
    Why are you people jumping all over my case? Why can't you be civil? I made a err and omitted "general", excuse me. That is the problem with nurses most of us are so busy to jump down someone's throat for a comment or an opinion. I don't need to be corrected. If this person received a cut without anesthesia whether it be general or local it is still an incident and needs to be reported. No one should ever be subjected to such pain. And yes, most women would undergoe the pain in order to save their baby. But that is another discussion, isn't it. Your replies to my answer were without question, offensive to me. Stop being know it alls! I can't stand nurses like you. You took my words, screwed around with them and turned them inside out. And for what reason? Do you feel superior now?
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    i ask we keep this thread civil. asking questions is one thing; grilling or making accusatory posts, quite another. i hate to have to close the thread because a lot can be learned by sharing various experiences and thoughts. please, if you feel tempted to attack someone, walk away from the computer and think before you post. please, converse here as you would among your professional peers at work or an ob conference.

    thank you.
  4. by   imenid37
    Quote from heartICU
    Patient had an epidural yet no IV access? Hmmm...something fishy here.
    We do need Iv access to do an epidural. It could have come out. I had Patient who was extremely obese not too long ago become diaphoretic and hypotensive post-epidural. Guess what slipped out as she sweated away. The IV that took 3 nurses and 4 sticks to insert. Luckily, anesthesia stuck her and got it back in on try #2 for him. Sometimes the IV comes out d/t Murphy's Law, not because we are bad nurses, etc. Both mom and baby recovered and did fine. Things do happen. Ithink it is good to discuss things like this, calmly because you never know what situation you may find yourself in.
  5. by   mitchsmom
    Quote from stevielynn
    We can't do an epidural w/o IV access . . .. maybe the access was lost . . . . still it only take a few seconds to start a new IV.

    More info is definitely needed . .

    steph

    One of ours didn't have IV access, either, she was bleeding out and no one could get it until the baby was already out (mom was still on the table)...
    She didn't have an epidural though; same deal, we have to have IV access for that but yeah it could have gone bad... sometimes stories are hard without all the details
    Last edit by mitchsmom on Dec 15, '06
  6. by   StatRNNJ97
    No anesthesiologist in house? No way! One bad outcome and it changes a nurses perspective! Have had true stat c/s in Labor and Delivery and without the Anesthesiologist in-house no doubt baby and possibly Mom would not have survived! Even if its a level 1 hospital - no excuse for not having in house anesthesia 24/7. I know its my opinion but...it my license also that I worked hard for and I am not willing to compromise in any way, especially with liability and lawsuits these days! I love working in Labor and Delivery and hope to keep it that way
  7. by   Jolie
    Quote from StatRNNJ97
    No anesthesiologist in house? No way! One bad outcome and it changes a nurses perspective! Have had true stat c/s in Labor and Delivery and without the Anesthesiologist in-house no doubt baby and possibly Mom would not have survived! Even if its a level 1 hospital - no excuse for not having in house anesthesia 24/7. I know its my opinion but...it my license also that I worked hard for and I am not willing to compromise in any way, especially with liability and lawsuits these days! I love working in Labor and Delivery and hope to keep it that way

    I don't think anyone would argue that having immediate access to anesthesia is ideal, but there are areas of the country where this is simply not possible.

    I worked in the NICU for 9 years before having my first child, and swore that I would NEVER deliver at any facility that did not have a Level III NICU, as I had seen too many neonatal complications that could have been prevented or minimized by immediate access to a NICU, rather than relying on transport. But by the time I was pregnant, we were living in a rural area of PA, where the nearest hospital with a Level III NICU was hours away. I gained a new respect and appreciation for the competencies required of nurses who work in rural hospitals. They managed my very complicated pregnancy extremely well, and enabled me to deliver a healthy baby.

    It simply isn't possible for every hospital to offer every service. While practicing in a rural setting may be unsettling for some nurses, there are others who thrive on the challenge, and provide excellent care to their patients despite having limitations.
    Last edit by Jolie on Dec 17, '06 : Reason: addition
  8. by   subee
    Quote from StatRNNJ97
    No anesthesiologist in house? No way! One bad outcome and it changes a nurses perspective! Have had true stat c/s in Labor and Delivery and without the Anesthesiologist in-house no doubt baby and possibly Mom would not have survived! Even if its a level 1 hospital - no excuse for not having in house anesthesia 24/7. I know its my opinion but...it my license also that I worked hard for and I am not willing to compromise in any way, especially with liability and lawsuits these days! I love working in Labor and Delivery and hope to keep it that way

    by definition, a level one service hospital has anesthesia 24/7. Perhaps the next time you go skiing or drive cross country, you could take the time to visit a rural hospital .... just to see how the other half lives. If every hospital had to have anesthesia 24/7 then many hospitals would have to close. That means that people who had to drive 80 miles to a hospital now have to drive even further. That means even driving the doctors out of town to follow the hospitals so that baslic primary care is difficult to obtain. Do yourself a favor and get out and see the world.
  9. by   NurseMMM
    At our facility, we have a response time of 20 minutes for the MD's to come to the hospital. Which sort of makes me uneasy most of the time. Alot can change in 20 minutes.
  10. by   edowhitetop
    :studyowl: I believe that the main problem was the panic factor. I was born at home - breech - and the doctor did not make it in time. Attending was a midwife - my grandmother. Despite the crisis situation and the fact that it involved her own youngest daughter, my grandmother did not panic and do the wrong things - as witnessed by the fact that I am here 70 years later. Her example was taught to us all through our growing up years: When a crisis presents, do what needs to be done first - then If you feel the need to fall apart, do it when the crisis is past.
  11. by   meme_911
    oOoOoOoO my gaaaaaaaaad unbleveable i cant imagen the pain the mother went through...

  12. by   AgentOrange
    A patient will not just lie still and let you slice open their abdomen if there is no anesthesia of some sort on board regardless of whether "it's for the baby" or any other reason. Get real.
    The patient didn't just lie there. The OP later clarified that 3 nurses held the patient down.
  13. by   subee
    Quote from AgentOrange
    The patient didn't just lie there. The OP later clarified that 3 nurses held the patient down.
    And the OP said that the patient was OK with it. She's a very young girl and got to leave with a healthy baby and, according to post, was not traumatized by it. I hope that her surgeon learned from this and will not panic the next time a crisis like this comes about. OB is a businessmuch like anesthesia - long periods of boredom interrupted by short periods of sheer terror. I would love it if this thread died naturally, but if the moderator wants to shoot it, be my guest.

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