The Circumcision Discussion - page 66

I know this can be a HUGE debate, and I'm not looking to start any arguments. I was just wondering as you are OB nurses. I'm expecting a boy in July and not sure if we should circ. or not. My... Read More

  1. by   ElvishDNP
    Not to nurses, no. I can't speak for anyplace else, but my hospital actually loses money on circs.
  2. by   2curlygirls
    NICU nurse here.

    I would never circumcise my (completely hypothetical) male infant. No way, no how.

    One of the three circs I have had the unfortunate opportunity to witness was so horribly brutal I left the room sobbing and our NICU fellow stepped in to take my place. He sympathized because he's from Europe where they don't do them routinely.

    I recently had a patient brought to NICU because his circ wouldn't stop bleeding. I held pressure for an hour. Then had to apply topical epinepherine. That situation alone convinced my on-the-fence-about-circ to not do it.

    There's no medical reason to do it! At least not enough convincing research to sway my opinion on the matter. Thankfully, our Neo's are outspokenly anti circ as well.
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    We hardly do circs in our hospital any more. I realize most expectant parents have their minds made up one way or the other, but I do cover this in my birthing classes. I explain what the procedure is, show expectant parents how the penis looks before and after, and that they are best off waiting until breastfeeding and thriving are established, before undertaking the procedure, if they elect for it. I also explain it is up to them as a personal decision, and nowadays, most insurance companies do not cover its costs, seeing it as elective. Further, it is much cheaper to have it done as an office procedure, to boot, which is a strong consideration if insurance won't pay.

    Some classes open up for discussion. I do not as it can get very heated and really make the whole atmosphere very tense. I tell them I willing to point them to studies either way after class, if they choose to ask.

    I am very careful not to bias my discussion one way or the other.

    I am so very glad to see the circ procedure on a 1 day old or less baby in the hospital is all but gone where I work. Relieved, actually. These babies are challenged enough at that time, just learning to breathe, feed and be outside the womb. And it does give babies and parents time to bond before this procedure is undergone.
  4. by   hillarypeace2006
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    We hardly do circs in our hospital any more. I realize most expectant parents have their minds made up one way or the other, but I do cover this in my birthing classes. I explain what the procedure is, show expectant parents how the penis looks before and after, and that they are best off waiting until breastfeeding and thriving are established, before undertaking the procedure, if they elect for it. I also explain it is up to them as a personal decision, and nowadays, most insurance companies do not cover its costs, seeing it as elective. Further, it is much cheaper to have it done as an office procedure, to boot, which is a strong consideration if insurance won't pay.

    Some classes open up for discussion. I do not as it can get very heated and really make the whole atmosphere very tense. I tell them I willing to point them to studies either way after class, if they choose to ask.

    I am very careful not to bias my discussion one way or the other.

    I am so very glad to see the circ procedure on a 1 day old or less baby in the hospital is all but gone where I work. Relieved, actually. These babies are challenged enough at that time, just learning to breathe, feed and be outside the womb. And it does give babies and parents time to bond before this procedure is undergone.
    I am starting to believe this is a regional cultural issue. My parents also thought it was insane to not circumsize but none of them could say why.
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Other than religious considerations, the number one reason I have heard expressed in those who cared to share was so father and son "looked the same" down there.

    That is not a really good reason, to me, but it was the reason I allowed my now teenaged son to be circ'd. I would not do the same today, for a lot of reasons. I would not have caved as easily, at least, knowing what I know. It seems lame, what my reasons were back then. I just did not know better.
  6. by   hillarypeace2006
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Other than religious considerations, the number one reason I have heard expressed in those who cared to share was so father and son "looked the same" down there.

    That is not a really good reason, to me, but it was the reason I allowed my now teenaged son to be circ'd. I would not do the same today, for a lot of reasons. I would not have caved as easily, at least, knowing what I know. It seems lame, what my reasons were back then. I just did not know better.

    Well if I were you I wouldn't be harsh on myself. The cultural shift has definitely recently changed.. it was a norm when you had your son. You are a good mom regardless..i've read your posts and you sound like a real good mom.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Thank you for that. I have let it go really. But like I said, if I were to have another boy, I would think this through MUCH more before electing to go through a circ (or rather have him go through it). My own mind has changed a lot in 16 years.
  8. by   bsrn0523
    In nursing school years ago, I watched a circumcision on a newborn. The baby turned blue, screamed and cried. I decided not to circ my three boys after I did a fairly large amount of research on the subject. My father (who is not circumcised, as he was born in the 1930's) said it best, " As long as you wash and care for the area, there shouldn't be a problem." Still, it is a personal decision and I respect the parent's right to decide what is best for their child.
  9. by   Susan3970
    If you do decide to have your baby circumcised it needs to be done before he is 30 days old. I'm telling you this because it is something I wish I would have known when my son was born. It took us a long time to decide and we finally got him to a doctor when my son was 31 days old. They said we would have to wait until he is 1 year old and the price would jump from $250 (the price before 30 days old) to $5,000. So, this ended up not being something we could afford, unfortunately. I hope this helps!
  10. by   rn/writer
    Quote from bsrn0523
    In nursing school years ago, I watched a circumcision on a newborn. The baby turned blue, screamed and cried. I decided not to circ my three boys after I did a fairly large amount of research on the subject. My father (who is not circumcised, as he was born in the 1930's) said it best, " As long as you wash and care for the area, there shouldn't be a problem." Still, it is a personal decision and I respect the parent's right to decide what is best for their child.
    There is no excuse for this kind of barbaric approach. At the hospital where I work, babies are given Sweet-Ease on a pacifier as a prep, numbed with a penile block, and given acetaminophen immediately following the procedure. Additionally, our docs wait for the block to take hold. Most babies don't even cry. We take them out to their moms within minutes for feeding and snuggling. Docs who do not pay adequate attention to pain management need to be challenged on their methods.

    Regardless of your stance on the pros and cons of circumcision, the act itself does not have to be an exercise in cruelty.
  11. by   KYCNM
    It's not only the physicians who need to be challenged, but the nurses who are "stuck in the mindset" that "they'll forget it in a few minutes". Or, "They cry when you inject the xylocaine, too, so it can't be that helpful". Of course, they would say it was barbaric if they had a lacerated finger and the physician refused to numb it before placing sutures.
  12. by   2curlygirls
    But then the local wears off and it hurts!!! Every time the baby pees, they scream! And many don't want to breastfeed for a long time afterward.

    No medical reason to do it. None.
  13. by   KYCNM
    I understand that, however, that does not address the situation if the parents have REQUESTED that the baby be circumcised. There may be no medical indication, I am not arguing that point. Many parents still WANT their child circumcised. They have made this decision long before they arrived in the hospital, and do not need to be confronted by someone on a mission. The point is that some nurses are stuck in the past when they were taught that "infants don't have a memory for pain" or "they get over it".

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