The Circumcision Discussion - page 110

by jmspeach 187,699 Views | 1299 Comments

I know this can be a HUGE debate, and I'm not looking to start any arguments. I was just wondering as you are OB nurses. I'm expecting a boy in July and not sure if we should circ. or not. My husband says yes, it's better... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from deege58
    Ok, we are all getting confused here!! I AM ANTI-CIRC!!! COMPLETELY, HATE IT!!! OKEEDOKEE!!!
    Um.. So am I... My son is intact- I just think it's a personal decision that isn't my place to get into when it relates to anyone else. So why the commentary from the previous post? *lost & confused*

    (Originally Posted by deege58 yawn...
    your mind's made up, we wont confuse you with facts.. )
    vashtee likes this.
  2. 2
    Might have been some gremlins. They come out every now and then & mess up a quote or a post. Or, it could have been tongue-in-cheek.

    May we all join hands and sing Kumbayah??
    UTVOL3 and Equinox_93 like this.
  3. 0
    Quote from Joe12
    Congratulations, what a lucky boy.
    I'm with Joe, congrats on your little(intact) boy, so happy for you!!
  4. 2
    Been away for a while and delighted to see the debate still in full swing although the pro argument is amusing world war 11 I believe the UK was in that one no massive out break of infection affecting the status of the country and you know we old people as well and men are intact and flooding the NHS with massive problems.:wink2: In simple in UK circumcision is seen what it is barbaric. I compare it with the cutting of epitomes - why do that I know just in case they tear- and of course may save a few minutes of the providers time. Circumcision is nothing more than a money making process - plan and simple - the empire has new clothes people.
    dnp2004 and deege58 like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from morte
    this should rarely to never be an issue, the problem is staff is unaware/unwilling to give appropriate care.
    Wrong.

    Strictures of the foreskin are in no way caused by anything staff does or does not do.
  6. 0
    Quote from Valerie Salva
    Wrong.

    Strictures of the foreskin are in no way caused by anything staff does or does not do.
    And are usually fixed in infanthood
  7. 3
    Quote from Valerie Salva
    Wrong.

    Strictures of the foreskin are in no way caused by anything staff does or does not do.
    I don't think I agree with this. Premature retraction by Doctors and other medical staff, which is any retraction that occurs before the child knows he can do it himself, can cause tears and scaring which may cause problems for him down the line. In most cases, staff should not do any retraction of an intact boy.
    Elvish, Smurfette752, and deege58 like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from Joe12
    I don't think I agree with this. Premature retraction by Doctors and other medical staff, which is any retraction that occurs before the child knows he can do it himself, can cause tears and scaring which may cause problems for him down the line. In most cases, staff should not do any retraction of an intact boy.
    i think she was referring to my post, in response to her post, about elderly men........and i would think i have a point.....if unable to do his own care, and it isnt provided, infection, which i thought was her point, would be more likely.......also, joe, you obviously know more about this subject than i do. I thought i had read somewhere that SOME elderly men's foreskins become unretractable and that you could do damage in trying to do that as well as in a child.......yes/no?
  9. 0
    "In adult men, paraphimosis typically occurs in the elderly. The condition is associated with poor hygiene and chronic balanoposthitis. The chronic infection is postulated to cause a contracture of the opening of the prepuce (phimosis). This contracture forms a fibrotic ring of tissue, which leads to constriction when the foreskin is retracted over the pliable glans."
    I stand corrected. Apparently it happens late in life too.
  10. 0
    http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic2874.htm

    Paraphimosis is a relatively uncommon condition and occurs less often than phimosis.
    Paraphimosis is almost always an iatrogenically or inadvertently induced condition. The condition occurs more often in hospitals and nursing homes than in the private community. In the private community, either the affected individual or a parent often retracts the prepuce and then inadvertently leaves it in its retracted position. In most cases, the foreskin reduces on its own and therefore precludes paraphimosis; however, if the slightest resistance to retraction of the prepuce is present, leaving it in this state predisposes it to paraphimosis. As edema accumulates, the condition worsens.
    According to the National Hospital Discharge Survey, a trend in the United States over the last 30-40 years has been toward noncircumcision. Circumcision rates, which were at an all-time high of 78-80% in the mid-to-late 1960s, decreased to 55-60% in 2003. With more uncircumcised individuals, paraphimosis has the potential to become more common. Because paraphimosis is a condition that is almost always iatrogenically or inadvertently induced, simple education and clarification of proper prepuce care to parents, the individuals themselves, and health care professionals may be all that is required to prevent this problem.


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