Spanish for L&D nurses - page 2

Hey, I am graduating in 2 weeks and have been working on an L&D unit for almost a year, and I love it! I know this is my "niche". My question is, does anyone know whether or not there is something... Read More

  1. by   nurseangel47
    Sorry. Not to sound prejudice here. If they're residing in our country, sucking up our resources, obtaining free medical care, not paying taxes, living here illegally, etc. WHY should WE be the ones to seek Spanish as a second language? What is wrong with the picture here? They are the ones in OUR country. THEY should have to learn to speak at least enough ENGLISH to function in life! Vent.....rage.....DO NOT FLAME ME!
  2. by   ABQLNDRN
    Quote from nurseangel47
    Sorry. Not to sound prejudice here. If they're residing in our country, sucking up our resources, obtaining free medical care, not paying taxes, living here illegally, etc. WHY should WE be the ones to seek Spanish as a second language? What is wrong with the picture here? They are the ones in OUR country. THEY should have to learn to speak at least enough ENGLISH to function in life! Vent.....rage.....DO NOT FLAME ME!
    I will not flame you. I don't like the fact that I, in order to function in my job and keep my license, am forced to learn their language. It's very rude for people to go to another country expecting the natives to speak to them in their language. I speak French and once, when I was in Paris with some friends, had one of them walk up to a French woman and ask her where the Eiffel Tower was--in English. I profusely apologized and asked her again in French. She then told us how to get there. I was so embarrassed.
  3. by   nurseangel47
    Thanks, Maraleen, for not giving me aggro over this issue. I have very strong feelings and opinions about it. Am SO glad that you understand and see if from the correct view!
  4. by   Mission
    For those of you who are a bit more open-minded...

    I don't know if it is being offered this year, but I think this would be a great program: PerinatalSpanishinPuertoRico
  5. by   ABQLNDRN
    Quote from Mission
    For those of you who are a bit more open-minded...

    I don't know if it is being offered this year, but I think this would be a great program: PerinatalSpanishinPuertoRico
    Open-minded?
  6. by   Nurseintraining77
    I'm not going to debate whether or not they should be here and learn the language or not. However the fact of the matter is many don't/can't speak the language for whatever reason.

    Learning a second language isn't that easy for many people no matter how hard they try....trust me, I've been studying my husband's native language for about 5 years now with very little success, lol. Now my daughter can pick up things in a heartbeat, but for me it takes forever just to learn to ask for a cup of coffee :smilecoffeecup:

    The way I see it is you have two options here. Either avoid areas with large Spanish speaking populations, or have fun learning another language in order to help your patients. Besides you may find you learn a little something new about yourself in the process. Not to mention the fact that aquiring a language skilll may prove useful to you and open up additional doors in your career.

    Naima
  7. by   Meerkat
    cervix is el cuello del utero (neck of the uterus)
    Some Mexican ladies have a sort of blanket called a 'reboso' that they like to keep with them for the birth.
    Some Mexican ladies will not express their pain...they tend to try to 'be strong' and quiet when they are labouring. On the other hand, some believe that if you do not make alot of noise during the birth it shows that you did not 'work' hard to bring the baby into the world.
    Many hispanic females, not just Mexicans, are very shy about males being present for the birth.
    If you really try to speak the language, they are usually extremely grateful and pleased, even if you mess up a little. But be careful!
    I once had a doc try to show off by speaking Spanish to a young woman. He intended to ask her how old she was (cuantos aos tiene?) but ended up asking "How many anuses do you have?" (cuantos anos tiene?)...all because of that little mark over the 'n'!!!
    Incidentally, I am not hispanic, I was not born speaking Spanish. I just love to help the underserved populations...I imagine how frightening it would be to be in labour in another country where you don't understand the procedures and processes. I self-studied almost every night, and my patients taught me some of their culture along the way. Now, other nurses ask me to translate! It's wonderful that you want to help...don't be afraid to make mistakes (just dont ask how many anuses she has), just keep trying and trying---they will love you for it, especially if you get good over time. These ladies need you, they need the comfort you can bring by helping them thru labour and delivery...ask family members about their culture, their customs, etc. You will be a priceless resource for your patients AND hospital! Good luck!
  8. by   ABQLNDRN
    Quote from Nurseintraining77
    I'm not going to debate whether or not they should be here and learn the language or not. However the fact of the matter is many don't/can't speak the language for whatever reason.

    Learning a second language isn't that easy for many people no matter how hard they try....trust me, I've been studying my husband's native language for about 5 years now with very little success, lol. Now my daughter can pick up things in a heartbeat, but for me it takes forever just to learn to ask for a cup of coffee :smilecoffeecup:

    The way I see it is you have two options here. Either avoid areas with large Spanish speaking populations, or have fun learning another language in order to help your patients. Besides you may find you learn a little something new about yourself in the process. Not to mention the fact that aquiring a language skilll may prove useful to you and open up additional doors in your career.

    Naima
    I always have "as much fun as I can" learning another language. I speak fluent French because I took in school it for 6 years. I love speaking French. I learned "many new things about myself" speaking French, especially during my trip to Paris. I feel as though there are many "doors" already open to me because I speak French.

    The point of what I said earlier is, many (NOT ALL) of these people who don't speak English don't even TRY because our country, in the interest of economics, caters to their inability to speak English. Learning English is now treated as an option. I think that is disrespectful to Americans. When I have patients laugh and look at me as if to say, 'No, I don't speak English, and why should I?', I have a problem with that; I resent that. I have a lot more respect for my Spanish-speakers that at least try to speak some English.

    I do speak my "very best Spanish" to the Spanish-speakers I have and I take care very good care of them; my level of care is the same for all of my patients. THAT'S what matters.

    So I don't need advice--I live where I live and am not moving somewhere else. That's ridiculous. They need to make an effort to learn English. I learned Several Spanish phrases in the first day that I needed to do so, and I see no reason why they can't learn (at least) how to say,"I don't speak English, but I am trying." I am not ashamed of my opinion and do not need to be reformed.
  9. by   HappyNurse2005
    I studied spanish in high school for multiple years and was decent at it. then, lack of use made my spanish abilities tank. so i do remmeber a bit of it, and can read it better than i can speak it.

    i figure, its not my job to care about why they are here, why they dont speak english, etc etc etc. its my job to take care of them-so i do what i can and muddle my way thru spanish.

    of course, i did have a spanish speaking lady who knew enough english to know how to say the father of the baby was with "other woman"
  10. by   Nurseintraining77
    Quote from HappyNurse2005
    i figure, its not my job to care about why they are here, why they dont speak english, etc etc etc. its my job to take care of them-so i do what i can and muddle my way thru spanish.
    I think this is exactly the point. Besides the OP only asked about where should could find a decent book to help her help her patients. I've only been on this forum a few short months, but I find a lot of people to be very negative and self-righteous. I find it hard to believe that patients don't catch on to this no matter how hard someone tries to fake it

    And to Maralenn, I find it interesting that you obviously took offense to my post as it was never my intent to point at anyone in particular. I simply was making a general statement based on the tone of the thread which was veering from the OP's original question. You are most certainly entitled to your opinion just as I am entitled to mine.
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Please, let's not make this a debate about whether people coming from other lands where no English is spoken should be somehow mandated or required to learn English once living here in the USA, or not. This was a request for assistance, no more than that.

    I appreciate how frustrating it is not to be able to communicate with patients for many reasons, not just language barriers. None of us can learn all languages that present to us in our patients. All we can do is our best to find interpretive services; that is what is required of us in hospitals, anyhow.

    The debate about making English the official language of our country is quite another subject.

    Thanks and enjoy the thread.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Dec 20, '06
  12. by   ABQLNDRN
    Yeah, after I posted that, 77, I realized that I came across pretty mean--sorry. I ldo like all my patients--I like all varieties of people, regardless of the language they speak, their nationality, etc. So, sorry for venting too much.

    Sorry, also, to the OP for taking the post in a different direction.

    Incidentally, Barron's Medical Spanish is GREAT.

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