Seriously considering

  1. Hi, I'm seriously considering getting on the bandwagon for nursing school. The only 'problem' is, i'm only interested in being a nurse in the ob/ l&d field. I have no interest in taking care of ' sick people' if that makes sense. I have had a passion for labor and delivery for years and this is what I really want to do.

    I live in a rural area, so i'd be working in a small town hospital. Would I need to get my bsn, or do hospitals hire on 2 yr graduates?

    The main thing holding me back is the fear of putting in iv's and giving shots. Is this something you overcome with time? Do most people have some fears when entering the program?

    Any advice or comments would be greatly appreciated!
    Last edit by septoct7401 on Oct 29, '07 : Reason: additional information
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    OB has its sick people, too.
  4. by   Nurse_Diane
    Even IF you were hired directly into OB upon graduation, you would still have to deal with "sick people" outside of OB during your school clinicals.

    Like Marie stated, OB has "sick people" too. OB is not always a happy and healthy place. Also, those pts will need IVs and shots, too.
    Last edit by Nurse_Diane on Oct 27, '07 : Reason: typos
  5. by   MustangSallie1997
    I think a lot of nursing students have anxieties about shots and IVs, I know I did. I also know that almost every laboring patient that comes in the door, depending on where you work, gets an IV and blood drawn. I went straight into L/D after graduation and was there for 10 years. I LOVE IT, but there are many sick people there too, and nursing school is hard enough without hateing what you are doing if it is other than an OB rotation. You can do that work with your ADN or BSN, but remember, you have to pass all the other semesters of school to graduate and what if you cant get an OB position right out of school, sometimes it is very difficult with no experience, are you willing to work in another area until you get the job you want.........and........will you hate every minute of life if you do take that position in an area other than OB ?? Just my .

    Also, another possability could be that you got into your clinicals and found another area that you were passionate about !! Good luck in what ever decision you make, but the decision to go into nursing school should have nothing to do with a bandwagon !!
  6. by   Athenas83
    Quote from septoct7401
    Hi, I'm seriously considering getting on the bandwagon for nursing school. The only 'problem' is, i'm only interested in being a nurse in the ob/ l&d field. I have no interest in taking care of ' sick people' if that makes sense. I have had a passion for labor and delivery for years and this is what I really want to do.

    I live in a rural area, so i'd be working in a small town hospital. Would I need to get my bsn, or do hospitals hire on 2 yr graduates?

    The main thing holding me back is the fear of putting in iv's and giving shots. Is this something you overcome with time? Do most people have some fears when entering the program?

    Any advice or comments would be greatly appreciated!
    Dont fear the shots! It was my greatest fear, but it's been the least of my worries since starting nursing school.
  7. by   allthingsbright
    I started school with much the same feelings (ie NO interest in med surg) and have come to realize OB patients are often "Med/surg" patients as well. "Sick people" are often capable of reproduction --and you will need to know how to care for sick people having babies. (This is why many OB jobs require med/surg experience.) I really value all the different clinical areas I have experienced in school-I'll need every experience I can get in my new job as a labor/delivery nurse.

    Might I suggest you check out becoming a doula? Then you can work at supporting laboring clients outside the nursing profession and get a glimpse of the labor and delivery floor and what is expected of L&D nurses. I did this and it was invaluable to see what labor nurses really do. It isnt all snuggles and smiles and happy endings!


    As for degrees, there are 2 year and 4 year RN's that take the same liscensure exam and both work in hospitals. Go to the student nursing forums for more info. Good luck!
  8. by   JulieRN07
    I would definitely advise you to only go into nursing if you truely love taking care of people. In all areas of bedside nursing you will be responsible for taking on all different sorts of patients- and as the others have said, you will have to get through your different clinical rotations dealing with sick people-but the good thing about clinicals is that you may find your niche in another area of nursing- so always keep an open mind so you don't miss out on awesome opportunities to learn!

    Whatever you decide, the best of luck to you!
  9. by   GilaRRT
    OB should be considered a form of critical care. On any given day, you can expect critically ill patients.
  10. by   33-weeker
    You might want to consider being a midwife. You would not be dealing with nearly as much 'sick people' because they would not meet the criteria for midwifery care/home or birthing center birth. You live in a rural area, so likely there is a need for trained midwives. Of course this assumes midwifery is legal in your state... Just a thought.
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I would definitely advise you to only go into nursing if you truely love taking care of people.
    I'm attempting not to get bent out of shape about this remark, however, i did not get the impression that the OP was having THAT kind of issue.
  12. by   JulieRN07
    There is nothing to get bent out of shape about, Marie. I was only suggesting an overall love for people and caring for them-sick and all- as a basis for going into a nursing field. I mean, what other reason is there to become a nurse?
  13. by   KellNY
    Quote from Jules24
    I mean, what other reason is there to become a nurse?
    I kow of many nurses who couldn't give much of a crap about caring for people-they like the scientific part of it and/or the adrenaline rush, assisting in codes, the money/benefits/flexibility/stability, procedures, traveling, etc.

    There are lots of other reasons to go into nursing, and I'm surprised that you don't know that. If all you want is to "care for people" why not save a lot of time and money on school and be a CNA or Pt. care Tech, or volunteer or something?
  14. by   JulieRN07
    I find that very disheartening that there are nurses out there taking care of my loved ones "don't give a crap" about them.

    And to keep this trend from continuing- I would tell anyone that if you don't have a heart for people, and don't want to help them get better in one way or another- please choose another career.

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