Is it safe to be around Bells Palsy patients while pregnant?

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    I have read that Bells Palsy can be caused by CMV, Herpes, Epstein Barr, and something else, I forget, but the majority are caused by Herpes. If the patient has no lesions, and is on antiviral medications for several days, is it safe to be around this person while in the first trimester? The cause is not known, as the patient has no signs of any illness. Not to treat them as a patient, but to say, stay at their house for a weekend. Is this safe or not?
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  3. 5 Comments so far...

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    you cannot contract herpes by just standing beside someone, or being near them, there needs to be some type of skin to skin contact, like sex or kissing. sharing drinks with someone with an oral cold sore is not such a great idea, but other than that i cannot think of other ways to get it. it's not transmitted by coughing or sneezing..

    even if they were having an outbreak of genital or oral herpes, you are safe being around them, or living with him. as long as you do not kiss or have sex with them, you are good.

    i really cannot think of any other way to get herpes.
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    Thanks so much! There would be no sex or sharing of drinks/etc.
  6. 0
    From the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokes

    Bell's Palsy Fact Sheet
    Bell's palsy is a form of temporary facial paralysis resulting from damage or trauma to one of the two facial nerves. The 7th cranial nerve is a paired structure that travels through a narrow Fallopian canal in the skull, beneath the ear, to the muscles on each side of the face. For most of its journey, the nerve is encased in this bony shell. [...]
    Bell's palsy occurs when the nerve that controls the facial muscles is swollen, inflamed, or compressed, resulting in facial weakness or paralysis. Exactly what causes this damage, however, is unknown
    [...]
    Bell's palsy afflicts approximately 40,000 Americans each year. It affects men and women equally and can occur at any age, but it is less common before age 15 or after age 60. It disproportionately attacks [...] people who have diabetes or upper respiratory ailments such as the flu or a cold.

    for more information go to http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/b...tail_bells.htm
  7. 0
    Thank you!
  8. 0
    Fascinating thread, GooeyRN, and awsome answers too.......never would have thought of this, it's very interesting. Thanks!
    Last edit by abbnurse on Apr 19, '10 : Reason: changed "of" to "have"


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