Really sad :( - page 3

by NOLAmommy3 7,841 Views | 37 Comments

Hey Everyone, I just graduated from nursing school in May and I am super excited to be a new nurse. Throughout nursing school, I saw myself as either a L&D nurse or a NICU nurse. I precepted in the NICU during my last semester... Read More


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    I always wanted to do Mother Baby and that has always been my dream job. However, I got offered a ICU job and I love it. Is it my passion? No, but I'm learning a ton, so that after I get my year experience I can either stay or have other options.
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    I graduated in January and have yet to find a job except for a camp nurse job for a few weeks this summer. My dream is also to work in L&D and eventually become a midwife but I would kill for ANY job as a nurse right now. Be thankful, you are only at the beginning of your career.
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    I'm sorry you're struggling :/. It's hard to find a passion for something and then end up going a totally different direction, for sure.

    Just remember, you went to school to become a nurse, to get a job as a nurse, to pay your bills as a nurse. Notice there wasn't any mention of "L&D Nurse" in that sentence. No one ever guaranteed that. But you ARE accomplishing embarking on your career path! Congrats.

    You're going to have to keep the fire lit from within. Remind yourself what you're working for on your own time. If you wanted to be a film actress, you'd probably have to deal with bit roles, walk on parts, etc. Basically HOURS of work to make other people look good, and that's about it. I'm sure some people get lost in the grind and give up because they lost sight of what they were working for. But people who succeed kept on trucking. So keep on trucking, my friend.
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    Any mom/baby manager is more likely to hire a nurse with some med-surg experience than a new grad with no experience. You are learning skills you will use your whole career. Also, being in a hospital gives you an advantage because they are more likely to hire from internal applicants than outside applicants.

    No nursing job is forever. Very few nurses stay in the same specialty their whole career. So, my advice is to keep doing what you are doing, networking within your hospital and making a good impression with managers and coworkers. Get your ceritfications or whatever, continue your educaiton. When an opening comes up in the department you want to work in, you will be ready, with an advantage over other applicants.
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
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    First, I want to say that I am truly sorry for the situation you are in. You went to school to get a career that you love and not even a year in you are miserable and on the verge of already being burnt out. That is so frustrating! I am going to go against the grain of a lot of people and say that I think it is awesome that you know what your passion is in nursing and that you know what type of nursing is going to make you happy and you want to be there as soon as possible! I don't think you should ever give up on that dream or let anyone make you feel that you need to stay in a position that makes you feel the way you do just because you "need to pay your dues" or your a new grad so you won't get your dream job right after school. I think that if you know what your passion is then you need to do everything you can to get there. I graduated last December and I knew I wanted to work ICU-long before I began nursing school. I had so many people telling me similar things that people here are about paying your dues, not getting your dream job right out of school, settling for med/surg because at least its a job. You better believe that I didn't listen to one person that said those things because I knew that I sacraficed a lot for nursing school and I wasn't about to settle for a job that I knew I had no passion for or would make me miserable. I didn't go to nursing school just to get a job, I went to get a career that I would love. And you better believe, six months after graduation and many rejection letters and phone calls later I got my dream job in a CVICU!!!!! That was the first offer of employment that I got but I only applied for positions that were going to be related to my passion. I believe that you should continue working in your unit until you can transfer to the unit you want to be in because although it isn't your passion, it will give you great experience for your dream job. Get any certifications you can that will help, shadow the nurses in the unit you want to work, and DON'T GIVE UP!!!! A lot of people keep telling you to grow up but I don't think knowing what your passion is and trying to pursue it makes you young and naive....I think it makes you motivated!!!! I understand that many people can't get their dream job right after school for one reason or another but I do think that even if you don't does not mean to give up on that dream. It may take a little longer to get where you want to be you will get there if that is really where you want to be! Please don't listen to any negative nellies out there putting a damper on your dream-you know what your passion is and I applaude you for wanting to pursue it!!!!
    MissIvy and lovedijah like this.
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    Quote from Stephalump
    I'm sorry you're struggling :/. It's hard to find a passion for something and then end up going a totally different direction, for sure.

    You're going to have to keep the fire lit from within. Remind yourself what you're working for on your own time.
    This.

    I totally can relate to your what you are saying. After working as an aide in L&D in school, I wasn't able to secure a position on the unit, and ended up taking a position in psych 5 mo after I graduated. I was miserable to say the least. (Three years later, I have learned to appreciate psych on its own merits, understanding my own limits -I can't do it full time, or near full time). During that time I continued trying for OB, then even just med/surg (you are lucky to have that chance right away!).

    I finally got a shot at med/surg 2.5 yrs after graduating. THRILLED to say the least, finally I was on my way to getting the acute care experience I needed to make the transition to L&D. Until a month after starting, I quickly realized I did not have the personality for that type of position. So much so that, I was heading towards resigning after about 4 months, and just go back to psych. Then by some miracle I was able to secure a position in L&D (starting in a few weeks), and I had a LEGIT reason to resign.

    Okay, so what am I rambling about (I'm not even sure myself, LOL). 1) keep what you love in your heart, and just tell yourself it will come at some point, that way it WILL come at some point. 2) Med surg is good experience no doubt. Don't give up just yet (I know its hard, and I can't really talk considering I was going to quit!) but perhaps once you've got some more experience behind you, play with your schedule in ways that will prevent the burnout while holding out for what you really want!
    TstormRN likes this.
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    Quote from TstormRN
    First, I want to say that I am truly sorry for the situation you are in. You went to school to get a career that you love and not even a year in you are miserable and on the verge of already being burnt out. That is so frustrating! I am going to go against the grain of a lot of people and say that I think it is awesome that you know what your passion is in nursing and that you know what type of nursing is going to make you happy and you want to be there as soon as possible! I don't think you should ever give up on that dream or let anyone make you feel that you need to stay in a position that makes you feel the way you do just because you "need to pay your dues" or your a new grad so you won't get your dream job right after school. I think that if you know what your passion is then you need to do everything you can to get there. I graduated last December and I knew I wanted to work ICU-long before I began nursing school. I had so many people telling me similar things that people here are about paying your dues, not getting your dream job right out of school, settling for med/surg because at least its a job. You better believe that I didn't listen to one person that said those things because I knew that I sacraficed a lot for nursing school and I wasn't about to settle for a job that I knew I had no passion for or would make me miserable. I didn't go to nursing school just to get a job, I went to get a career that I would love. And you better believe, six months after graduation and many rejection letters and phone calls later I got my dream job in a CVICU!!!!! That was the first offer of employment that I got but I only applied for positions that were going to be related to my passion. I believe that you should continue working in your unit until you can transfer to the unit you want to be in because although it isn't your passion, it will give you great experience for your dream job. Get any certifications you can that will help, shadow the nurses in the unit you want to work, and DON'T GIVE UP!!!! A lot of people keep telling you to grow up but I don't think knowing what your passion is and trying to pursue it makes you young and naive....I think it makes you motivated!!!! I understand that many people can't get their dream job right after school for one reason or another but I do think that even if you don't does not mean to give up on that dream. It may take a little longer to get where you want to be you will get there if that is really where you want to be! Please don't listen to any negative nellies out there putting a damper on your dream-you know what your passion is and I applaude you for wanting to pursue it!!!!
    Thank you for your positive insight on this subject. If I was the op and I heard "suck it up and grow up, etc" when I was venting I would be a little bummed. We are all entitled to our opinions and there is wisdom in that (previously mentioned stuff) too. Sometimes we do need to suck it up or grow up or Kick butt and get it done. That can be turned around and used as motivation. (I think it is hard when posting words because things can sound harsher than is meant to be.) Ok, enough of that. I have been a nurse for 3 1/2 years and I never really had a dream area I wanted to be in. I thought I wanted ER but I run around crazy on telemetry and don't want to run around more. I thought I wanted ICU but realized (as a student) that there wasn't much talking with patients on that floor (vents, sedated). I like to talk with and educate my patients. I feel fortunate that I started on Tele right out of school because it still has some med surg to it but I am also learning about cardiology and the acuity is a little higher, also 4 patients instead of 5. My last run was horrible and it is taking me over the edge of burn out and bitterness too. Unfortunately these bad days greatly outweigh good days in the last two years. I am to the point where I don't want to do bedside nursing anymore. I agree on not doing OT. I quit doing OT after my first year because of beginnings of burnout. Yesterday and today I am doing some research and looking into different fields in nursing that are not at the bedside , including cath lab and ophthalmology. I recently shadowed at a cath lab and I could see myself working there, just waiting for a position that might be opening up soon. I love working with patients and their families but we are stretched too thin lately and I don't like to feel angry and bitter when I leave work. My patients do not know this is how I feel, I do not let my feelings known when I am with my patients. I have a few coworkers that I work with and we vent in private to keep our sanity. I try to remember that the grass isn't always greener and each job has its own challenges and problems. I have been telling myself that for two years but when my stomach is flip flopping, my hair is falling out and I start to feel some dread the night before or the morning that I am supposed to work, that's when it is time to move on.
    serenity1 likes this.
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    I get that frustration when its not your passion. I work IMC med/surg and i really enjoy it so its hard for me to understand dreading to go to work..(especially when you have nice co-workers) .................its not the easy peasy no rush life of mother baby.... and you certainly have a bigger task list than the icu........but i also think there are major perks. If you can survive a busy med -surg floor you will have the time mgt skills for most types of nursing. you will get the skills in a variety of areas, ivs, foleys , ngs, wound care,..............having that ability will serve you. one of the problems i have heard from my acquaintances in the mother /baby unit is they aren't looked at as 'real nurses' by drs....and i think its kind of true. Getting a good skill base and knowledge base will help you gain the respect as a nurse and help you when med-surg problems come up.... So hang in there. mother baby, labor and delivery and nicu jobs do come open fairly frequently........so i think you will definitely get the opportunity when you have gotten your experience. Good luck!
    MJeanRN likes this.
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    I wanted L+D right after school, too, and tried to avoid med surg. It was especially hard when my friends got their first jobs in pecs, OR, ER, and ICU. They all had connections and I didn't and I couldn't even get a med surg interview. I ended up taking a job at an outpatient IVF office (and worked my butt off for three years with a high volume practice, difficult clientele, working weekends, holidays, and nights on call). It was interesting and I learned a lot but when I started to look for something else managers acted like I wasn't a real nurse since I worked outpatient. It took me a year to find a manager who realized that I had been dealing with the same population they have in L+D.

    However, I missed my old coworkers terribly when my new ones treated me like an annoyance, trembled every time I had to start an IV, and cried before AND after work everyday. It's better now, but certainly not perfect. And if you have a year of hospital experience, I imagine you'll be more marketable and more prepared than I was.
    sauconyrunner likes this.
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    Since your hospital has the option of changing units after those six months, I would try and stay on your floor for that experience. Trust me, six months will fly by. I stayed in LTC/SNF nursing for about eight months until I got into acute care (that time passed quickly!). I was not overly fond of that job, but learned a lot and met amazing people! What helped me is listing all of the positives of my job, and working on aspects of the job that I was able to change. There are always going to be things that are disliked about any job, but in my opinion, if you focus on the good things and what you can add to your knowledge base then you are already making yourself marketable for that L&D position. Best of luck!
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.


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