Question about men in labor/delivery and nursery. - page 2

by jhyde17

6,606 Views | 23 Comments

Hello all, I am 43 y/o male and am currently a student in my third semester of my ASN program. We are in our OB/PEDS rotation which was something I was dreading but come to find out I love it. I really want to work in the... Read More


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    I have worked with 2 wonderful male L&D nurses. It was wonderful to watch these men with laboring moms and with the families. Most of our moms didn't care who took care of them just as long as some one did. Then these same moms would come back with next pregnancy and specifically ask for them. It is done and can be wonderful. I learned a lot from both of them. Not only skills but care too.
    PedsRN9999 and jhyde17 like this.
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    Some of the nurses i work with are far more uncomfortable with the idea than the patients are. We have a male who floats to our unit, not for labor but for all the other female patients and he is awesome.
    jhyde17 likes this.
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    This is coming from a male - a male RN is probably not a good fit for L&D for many reasons - primarily it makes many women (and their significant others) uncomfortable. perhaps try NICU or peds.
    jhyde17 likes this.
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    Very good points....Thank you!

    I appreciate all the input. I know for a fact that I want to work nursery/nicu but was just wanting to be available to float or fill in for L&D as needed.

    I still have some time before I actually face this delima but am trying to think things through and be prepared.
    Last edit by jhyde17 on Jun 17, '12
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    Good point Jolie. I never thought of that.
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    I actively recruited a male RN when I was working in Fl. He was a new grad. Within 2 months we had patients coming in asking for him to be their nurse by name. He was outstanding.

    Just moved to Wa and the new manager is open to male nurses on our l/d unit.
    jhyde17 likes this.
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    This is coming from a male - a male RN is probably not a good fit for L&D for many reasons - primarily it makes many women (and their significant others) uncomfortable. perhaps try NICU or peds.
    Truth is is all about how you approach your patients. If you display insecurities they will pick up on that. Same thing applies to med-surg patients or even psych. Be there for them and to be their nurse, NOT their male nurse. You will be fine. If thats your calling go for it!!! I know this because I am a guy and give my OB patients good care.
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    Quote from ArgentumRN
    Truth is is all about how you approach your patients. If you display insecurities they will pick up on that. Same thing applies to med-surg patients or even psych. Be there for them and to be their nurse, NOT their male nurse. You will be fine. If thats your calling go for it!!! I know this because I am a guy and give my OB patients good care.
    I agree with this. It applies to men and women.

    Our labor staff is comprised of about 32 RNs, a few of whom are part-time. Four of those 32 are men, all of whom work full-time. The only complaint I have heard about any of them is from one woman who said that one of those nurses had cologne that was too strong. One of those men also works postpartum and special care nursery. We don't have a NICU at the facility where I work now.

    At the other two hospitals where I have worked there was a NICU, but no male nurses working in there. While I don't doubt that many men could do that job well, I think as a rule, women tend to enjoy holding, rocking, talking to, and generally caring for small infants and their mothers all day more than most men. It wouldn't give me any pause to see a man in the NICU though.

    To my mind, passion for what you do is the most important thing in conjunction with a commitment to maintain competencies. Do what you love and you are bound to be good at it and have the respect of your peers and the families you serve.
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    I live and work in the south, and it is incredibly rare to have male L&D nurses here. Very, very, very unusual. And at the rate that our patients refuse to have male students, it would probably be very diffiicult. We do have male NICU nurses, though, and they are great!
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    Quote from ElSea
    I've often wondered why someone wouldn't mind having a male ob-gyn, but might balk at a male nurse in the same field.Good Luck to you, I hope you get to do what you really love
    We have had a lot of discussions about this at work (no male RNs in our unit, and our manager has basically said it will never happen) and what we have decided is the difference is the level of contact. Our male docs are always chaperoned when they are with the patient. Would the male nurse get a chaperone? The doctors aren't sitting there for hours with a pushing patient doing perineal massage, either.


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