PA-C's on L&D - page 4

Does anyone have any expeirence with physician assistants on labor and delivery? My wife is looking to hire a PA and is convinced that they can do just about anything their doc will let them, going... Read More

  1. by   sbic56
    I didn't want a debate, but why are you looking to have the last word here? I just know PA's who are very talented and don't consider them monkeys at all. It really isn't debatable. It's kind of like saying diploma nurses are not as knowlegable as ADN's. Not provable and quite futile and foolish to try to do so.
  2. by   canoehead
    The Pa's at my hospital I would trust with my life. They are better in a code than all but one of the docs. However, they might deliver a precipitous baby once every five years, so no, I don't think they should do OB. If they decided to be trained and practice-absolutely they would do a great job. But so would about 50 % of the L&D RN's that are already here. With a precipitous birth in OB the RN does the baby catching, and the PA is called if she needs med orders. Well..sometimes the PA is called AFTER the med is given (PPH/Pitocin) but who keeps track??
  3. by   BRANDY LPN
    In the army hosp that I worked at PA's did a rotation through L/D just like the residents, now I dont know how many of these rotations they did but their scedule was similar to the residents/interns, they did deliveries and assisted in c/s.

    But even in my small rural hosp with no OBs we dont use em just the FPs.
  4. by   sbic56
    Quote from canoehead
    The Pa's at my hospital I would trust with my life. They are better in a code than all but one of the docs. However, they might deliver a precipitous baby once every five years, so no, I don't think they should do OB. If they decided to be trained and practice-absolutely they would do a great job. But so would about 50 % of the L&D RN's that are already here. With a precipitous birth in OB the RN does the baby catching, and the PA is called if she needs med orders. Well..sometimes the PA is called AFTER the med is given (PPH/Pitocin) but who keeps track??
    ITA. I have met some pretty lousy NP's, RN's, OB's, what have you, but that says nothing for the majority. If PA's are experienced in L&D, they would be every bit as capable as any other person with the same training and expertise.
  5. by   yersinia21
    Quote from fiestynurse
    No Ob/Gyn doctor in her right mind would ever allow a PA-C, under her supervision, to deliver babies in L&D. A Physician Assistant is expected to perform with similar skill and competency and to be evaluated by the same standards as the physician in the performance of assigned duties.
    What? You obviously have no experience with PAs. Its commonplace for docs to let their PAs deliver babies solo with the doc on pager if complications arise.

    Your wife is correct in saying that "they can do just about anything their doc will let them do." But, if I were her I would check with her malpractice carrier to see what they say. It could cause her rates to go up dramatically.
    You obviously dont understand malpractice insurance. They cover the doc, not the PA. The doc is ultimately responsible for the patient, not the PA.

    Also, hospitals have a say in the scope of practice for PAs in their facility. No hospital, that I know of, would allow this - some still have problems with CNMs in the delivery room because it is such a high risk area.

    It's a bad idea!
    Once again, bad information. Most hospitals DO ALLOW PAS to deliver babies. Its up to the docs discretion as to what the PAs can do or not do.
  6. by   fergus51
    Quote from yersinia21
    The insurance companies did fiscal analysis and outcome studies which showed that PAs can competently deliver babies with no increase in poor outcomes and at increased cost savings.

    I suppose you are still going to stick to your mantra that all PAs are "useless" as you put it, desptie the fact that research has been published showing your assumptions to be ********.
    Do you have any links to this research? Obviously PAs don't do deliveries in most hospitals or there wouldn't be so few nurses who know about them.

    By the way, the terms of service of this bb prohibit name calling and other rudeness. You may want to look those up before continuing to post.
  7. by   Dave ARNP
    Deleted by user
    Last edit by MD Terminator on Feb 29, '04
  8. by   fergus51
    Why are we drawing so many freaks lately? It's been a troll haven in the last little while.
  9. by   BETSRN
    I certainly do NOT think it is standard practice for PA's to be delivering babies.
  10. by   BETSRN
    Yersinia, you certainly DO have to be a surgeon to perform c/sections. The hospital is not going to let someone without surgical priviliges perform any kind of surgical procedure at the facility.
    One has to be priviliged for whatever procedure they are performing. For instance, at my facility, the OB's are the ones who do routine circumcisions because the pediatricians do NOT have surgical proviliges at my place. The hospital in the next town allows peds to do circs because they grant them surgical priviliges.
  11. by   BETSRN
    Yersinnia,
    I don't know where you get your information about PA's. All I know is that at the hospital in the next town, who has PA's, their orders have to be signed off within 24 hours by their covering doc. PA's are trained in ONE subspecialty only and their scope of practice is very limited. I am under the impression at leasta round here that that is the standard of practice for all PA's. Are they good? You bet they are. However, their scope in the long run is MUCH smaller than a nurse's. Why are you reacting so vehemently to all the comments posted. Are you a nurse? I would be interested in your background when you make such blatant statements. Thanks.
  12. by   gotosleep
    Quote from BETSRN
    Yersinnia,
    PA's are trained in ONE subspecialty only and their scope of practice is very limited. However, their scope in the long run is MUCH smaller than a nurse's.

    Not true at all.

    Taken from the American Academy of Physician Assistants,

    "Education consists of classroom and laboratory instruction in the basic medical and behavioral sciences (such as anatomy, pharmacology, pathophysiology, clinical medicine, and physical diagnosis), followed by clinical rotations in internal medicine, family medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, emergency medicine, and geriatric medicine. "

    I'm utterly amazed by the level of misinformation and hysteria associated with this thread.
  13. by   sbic56
    Quote from gotosleep
    Not true at all.

    Taken from the American Academy of Physician Assistants,

    "Education consists of classroom and laboratory instruction in the basic medical and behavioral sciences (such as anatomy, pharmacology, pathophysiology, clinical medicine, and physical diagnosis), followed by clinical rotations in internal medicine, family medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, emergency medicine, and geriatric medicine. "

    I'm utterly amazed by the level of misinformation and hysteria associated with this thread.
    You, too? I wish there were some PA's here to defend themselves. I work in psych and have met some very talanted PA's who are fabulous in psych; not at all what I would call limited. Some odd perception going on here on this thread. :uhoh21:

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