Nurse tracking devices - page 6

How do you guys feel about wearing tracking devices on your person? Your location displays on a computer screen where you are at inside the hospital at all times. Thanks... Read More

  1. by   EmerNurse
    Hmm.. if they made me wear one of these things, I'd have to give 'em something to track. All those missed or short breaks that I don't log for pay - you're paying me NOW, oh yes.

    I like data.. I like Excel spreadsheets - I can make them say anything I want, too.

    But it'd be too much work. If it's one thing I've learned, it's that fighting a half-arsed system is a worthless, demoralizing proposition. I now have just as much loyalty to you as you have to me. If they brought dog collars, lojacks, whatever, into my ER, I'd be saying Adios!

    I'm a darn good ER nurse - either trust me to do my job or go bother someone else!
  2. by   marygirl
    Our hospital uses a walkie-talkie device called Vocera. It is helpful to locate someone, say if there is a condition call on the line and you don't have time to hunt down the nurse assigned the patient--you can just call him/her on Vocera and tell them they have a call. We also use it if someone is in the cafeteria and there is a question regarding their patient--easier to ask the nurse than try to figure it out. Ours can also take outside phone calls and dial out. One time I took a patient being discharged to a drug rehab to meet his cab and the cab didn't show up. I used my Vocera to dial the cab company and found out that the cab was at the wrong area of the hospital. If I didn't have a Vocera, I would have had to take the patient back upstairs to make the call.
    I can also receive calls into the Vocera, but we do know we are being recorded. My hubby calls me on it sometimes--doesn't know the number of the unit where I'm working but can get me on Vocera to tell me something quick or ask about the schedule.
    Ours does have a tracking device but it gives the floor as a general location, can't tell you exactly which patient room you're in. My dislike is not in being tracked because I am generally where I need to be for patient care. My dislike is in having one more item clipped to my shirt front.
    Last edit by marygirl on Feb 6, '07
  3. by   LeahJet
    Sorry, I'm probably going to get flamed..... but the all the posters that are saying the tracking system is "handy" or "neat" or whatever.... is buying into what upper management wants you to.

    It is for them to make more money.
    BOTTOM LINE.
    It is a way for them to justify short staffing.

    Don't be naive enough to think that they are spending millions on things to be handy and neat for us.

    Don't be a herd animal.
    Last edit by LeahJet on Feb 6, '07
  4. by   rktele
    Our trackers turn off the call light as we enter the room, it's much easier than climbing over the bed to push the cancel button. We also use Vocera, like a walkie-talkie. It makes it easier when I have phone calls: the US calls me on Vocera, tells me I have a call, and can take a message for me if I'm in the middle of something with one of my patients. Ours do not work in the bathroom or break room, as far as I know.
  5. by   LeahJet
    Quote from rktele
    Our trackers turn off the call light as we enter the room, it's much easier than climbing over the bed to push the cancel button. We also use Vocera, like a walkie-talkie. It makes it easier when I have phone calls: the US calls me on Vocera, tells me I have a call, and can take a message for me if I'm in the middle of something with one of my patients. Ours do not work in the bathroom or break room, as far as I know.
    mmhmm...so the hospital spent mega-bucks so you won't have to push a cancel button, make it easier for you to take calls, and take your messages?

    The manufacturers of the tracking system have two campaigns going here.

    One for the nurses to make us compliant. (all the neat stuff it can do..woohoo)

    One for management to find a way to make nurses more "productive" and eventually having a reason to hire LESS nurses.
    It monitors every thing you do...gathering data.... that will be used against us.

    So again I ask everyone to step back and look at the big picture.
    How many of you out there work with sub-standard equipment? How many of you truly get paid what we deserve?
    Do you honestly think that the hospitals are going to spend all that money on something that makes life easier for us?
    You can bet your sweet patootie it's about the $$$. THEIR money.

    How will tracking us save the hospital money?

    They will have "data" and "proof" that it will be safe to work with less staff. We will be racing around trying to beat times that the system says should be the standard. MORE PRODUCTION....LESS MONEY.... music to administration's ears.

    Those that think this is a cool little device to locate people and make our lives easier are buying into what they want us to.

    My ER is currently installing this system and it will go online soon.
    I have some tough decisions to make.
  6. by   Mary Austin
    I encountered these tracking devices for the first time when I was floated to a med surg unit that was newly remodeled. The floor manager made us post 24 hour sheets in each patient room which were divided into hours and shifts. The instructions to each employee was that we had to sign our name to the sheet each time we made patient contact or was in that room in any given hour. What the manager was really doing, unbeknownst to staff, was comparing the written time in the room with the tracking device's log from the previous day. She had these handed in each day for an entire week. I suppose she wanted to see how honest her staff was each day, eh? Perhaps she was looking at productivity or what patient got the mostest from the hostess. Hard to say. Most eveyone followed the directions without asking questions of why we needed to sign a sheet in the room when we made contact. The staff, for the most part were good little followers. I agree with Timothy's reply. He hit the nail on the head with all he had to say about these devices. Heck no they are not spending money for us to find each other....they are going to give us more work to do. Is it any wonder why the US of A will be near a million nurses short in the near future? I know I am most definitely looking for a way out of the hospital by going back to school.

    Oh yes, I did leave the "tracker" in a patient's room just for fun. The patient was sleeping...midnight shift. I love reading Timothy's posts. Putting a tracker on a speedy little remote car and weaving it in and out of patients' rooms really appeals to me. That is something I would do if I could!!!!!
    Last edit by Mary Austin on Feb 7, '07
  7. by   canoehead
    Incredible, excellent arguments Tweety. If admin had put some thought into writing a reasoned response they might have been worth respecting.

    I worked in a hospital that used the system and intially I was opposed to it for all the reasons stated in this thread. When we got it, I loved it, though was still wary. They could definitely abuse the system, but it's a great tool when you are working the floor. I figured that if someone didn't like my work and bathroom habits I would be happy to move on anyway, so didn't care where they tracked me. The people that really minded being tracked left their badge at the nurses' station, and as far as I know were never disciplined.
    Last edit by canoehead on Feb 7, '07
  8. by   ghoprn
    Whatever happened to our basic rights as American citizens. Now the bosses want to track us! Next they'll have electronic monitoring on what we eat, this way if it's not healthy the hospital's insurance can drop you.
  9. by   eden
    Management won't fix our broken down system, it costs too much. Too bad we herd animals are so naive that we like the system Our computer system also helped increase our baseline staffing when we went to the union. You may dislike them all you want but when properly used it can be beneficial, whether you agree or not makes no difference since you(general you) do not seem to believe people when they say it makes thing easier. Oh well everyone's entitled to an opinion
  10. by   LeahJet
    Quote from eden
    Management won't fix our broken down system, it costs too much. Too bad we herd animals are so naive that we like the system Our computer system also helped increase our baseline staffing when we went to the union. You may dislike them all you want but when properly used it can be beneficial, whether you agree or not makes no difference since you(general you) do not seem to believe people when they say it makes thing easier. Oh well everyone's entitled to an opinion
    Oh, I don't doubt that it makes things easier. I don't doubt that nurses like it.
    I am just pointing out that there is more to it than people realize.

    Your management won't "fix" your broken system..... was that after you all went to the union and it actually benefited the nurses? hmmmmm.....
    I am sure that if your hospital spent so much money on this system, it probably has some type of warranty?? I am sure the manufacturers of this tracking system wouldn't leave its customer high and dry.
    It started costing your hospital some its precious money and it was more benficial to them for it to "go away".

    Of course, I am just spectulating here.
    Last edit by LeahJet on Feb 7, '07
  11. by   RN and Mommy
    Quote from PattonD
    How do you guys feel about wearing tracking devices on your person? Your location displays on a computer screen where you are at inside the hospital at all times.

    Thanks
    We wear them and I don't have a problem with it. It is also how we know if our patients are on their call light and how people are able to find us without searching everywhere for us.
  12. by   Mags4711
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    The reply I got: "Nurses don't dictate policy."

    And then I was told to stop referring to it as a 'tracking device' and to stop stirring up the staff over it.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.

    When the time comes (and it is coming, we are building a new hospital and these are to be included), may I use your letter?

    I'm a very proud pot-stirrer on my unit. I prefer to think of it as trying to spur intellectual thought, rather than stirring a pot.
  13. by   storm06
    I am stunned. I didnt even think a concept like this existed. I opened the thread wondering what the hell it could mean. It must have taken 2 pages of posts for it to sink in. Now I may live in a small town and I know the hospitals I have worked in don't compare to the size of some American hospitals, but you have got to be kidding me. Tracking nurses??????
    If there is an emergency you hit the yellow button, a siren loud enough to wake the dead goes off and a call light outside the room lights up. Trust me when that alarm goes off everyone drops everything. If there is a phone call for me then page me, otherwise if its not an emergency take a message. I havent had many problems getting staff assist when it has been required.
    Wow, I must really be niave to not know that this is going on. I wonder how long it will take before they try something like this in Australia (it may already be happening, I have just never heard of it) But then I have never worked anywhere that requires you to put a pin number and scan your thumb to get medication out of a drug trolly. (though I can see the benifits of having one)
    I feel like it is another 'paternal' method of keeping nurses in line. How dare we think for ourselves. That is a no-no.
    How can they simply look at the data and pull you up for spending 20 min with 1 client when 3 of your other clients were ringing their bells. How do they know what or why you were in one room for so long? Are you going to have to justify every action and defend every judgement call you make?
    As for tracking nurses on their breaks,, I tell you if I could swear on the board I would. :angryfire What right does anyone have to time how long it takes me to do a wee in the loo. Will they dock my pay if I spend more that 2 min in there? I have a right to privacy and as far as I am concerned to loo is the one place that is sacred. I am entiltled to a break. You are not going to say 'wow thanks for only having a 10min lunch break, thats very kind of you'. No what their going to say is 'how dare you take an extra 5min on your lunch break, this is your first and final warning'
    I can see the benifits in regards to large hospitals and finding staff. But overall this concept scares me. I am an independent free thinking professional who can prioritise patient care and assess the amount of time any of my patients need me. Someone said that this smacks of big brother, and I agree.
    Wow, I realy am stunned, and my post may not have made alot of sense(its a bit late or early,,, not sure which!) but I am truly horrified at the thought of someone tracking my every move. I would have to agree with some of the others, I would quit before being forced to wear a tracking device. I am not a criminal, you have employed me to do a job so let me do it; without being paranoid about taking 4 min in the loo.
    (besides any system can be beaten, people leaving thier trackers in patients rooms prove that. Will they require that this tracker be surgicaly attached to my ankle, and any attemp to remove it will have the federal police on my door to arrest me for unlawful tampering of a critical health data collection device?)

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