Nurse tracking devices - page 4

How do you guys feel about wearing tracking devices on your person? Your location displays on a computer screen where you are at inside the hospital at all times. Thanks... Read More

  1. by   INtoFL_RN
    While the arguments against the tracking devices are all good points, I still like the one we use on our unit. It really does aid our communication. The first hospital I even worked at had no tracking system at all, they overhead paged everyone for everything. Talk about pts not being able to rest! All we ever heard was "so and so, go to rm 17". It was so frustrating b/c the person paging us couldn't say over the intercom why we're needed. Makes it very hard to prioritize things when you're needed in 2 or more places at once. A year later, we got the Hill-Rom system, and our lives changed for the better! Sure, we all grumbled about lack of privacy and such, but then we realized how much better we were able to function. We all ran non-stop on that unit so even if management wanted to track us, they could see that were truly not getting breaks/lunches and had to clock out late regularly.

    The unit I work on now is a very busy PCU that is comprised of two very long hallways. It is so nice to be able to find someone to help or talk to just by looking at the locater on the wall. It's also been nice in staff emergencies without having to pull the "code" alarm. And BTW, we "disappear" from the tracking system when we leave the unit. At the end of the day, most of us leave our locators in the break room lockers so we don't lose them and get charged $75.
  2. by   Dixielee
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    Long post: this was my official reply to management's implementation of a tracking system at my former job:

    Timothy.
    :yeahthat:

    I am speechless! What a great letter!! I have been an RN for 34 long years, and have resigned from jobs on principle. We must stand up for what we know is right, and not always go along with the flow just because it is not worth the fight. All I can say is....it is always worth the fight.

    If our ancestors did not think it was worth the fight, we would still be British subjects.
  3. by   jennyfyre
    INtoFL RN,
    We use the Hill-Rom system at my hospital too, but I don't like it much. There is a considerable lag, and as unit coordinator on a peds unit, I don't often take the chance of calling into a sleeping baby's room to contact a nurse that may have been there 2 minutes ago, but isn't any longer! I usually use it in the capacity of "where were they last?" and start my searching there. When people are in the bathroom, our Hill-Rom reads "storage", the last place they locate before the bathroom! It is rather fun to tell spouses they'll have to wait a minute because whoever they want to talk to is in storage!
  4. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from INtoFL_RN
    While the arguments against the tracking devices are all good points, I still like the one we use on our unit. It really does aid our communication. The first hospital I even worked at had no tracking system at all, they overhead paged everyone for everything. Talk about pts not being able to rest! All we ever heard was "so and so, go to rm 17". It was so frustrating b/c the person paging us couldn't say over the intercom why we're needed. Makes it very hard to prioritize things when you're needed in 2 or more places at once. A year later, we got the Hill-Rom system, and our lives changed for the better! Sure, we all grumbled about lack of privacy and such, but then we realized how much better we were able to function. We all ran non-stop on that unit so even if management wanted to track us, they could see that were truly not getting breaks/lunches and had to clock out late regularly.

    The unit I work on now is a very busy PCU that is comprised of two very long hallways. It is so nice to be able to find someone to help or talk to just by looking at the locater on the wall. It's also been nice in staff emergencies without having to pull the "code" alarm. And BTW, we "disappear" from the tracking system when we leave the unit. At the end of the day, most of us leave our locators in the break room lockers so we don't lose them and get charged $75.
    How is this quarter million dollar system more effective for the purposes you cite then maybe a tenth of that for cell phones?

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    We have done fine in all the places I have worked without them. I would just as soon see admin not spend needless $$$ on such things, when there are needs that are much greater than this for our unit and the hospital (like, umm, better staffing or newer monitors/equipment that does not break down all the dang time!). Seems silly to me, expenditure on such things. But hey, that's me. I don't need a pin, collar or beeper to remind me my time is not my own at work. I know that already as a professional nurse. Seems to me the "scammers" will continue to get away with goofing off even with these devices and the hard-working ones will be the ones least appreciated at the very same time. You cannot measure the quality of care with such devices; this seems so evident to me. Like Tim said, there are many other factors involved in quality patient care that cannot be measured with such devices.

    I have also learned, some of the best, most sensible and enduring changes in policy and procedures were made when NURSES were at the table, included in making input to such things. Silly me.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 4, '07
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Tim, we agree rarely, but your letter is right-on in my book. You are so articulate.
  7. by   feminist-mama
    I'm currently a student, and I work at a local hospital as an aide. The hospital I work at does not use these devices.

    I did do clinicals last semester at a hospital that used them, and I LOVED them! It was great to be able to find "my" nurse without pestering other staff or standing around waiting and possibly missing stuff!

    I don't know how I'd feel about wearing one- I hear you on the "big brother" concerns, but I had such a great experience with them...
  8. by   ICURN_NC
    I wouldn't wear one. I mean, how many doctors/RT's/housekeepers have been asked to wear these kind of devices?
  9. by   LeahJet
    Quote from ICURN_NC
    I wouldn't wear one. I mean, how many doctors/RT's/housekeepers have been asked to wear these kind of devices?
    Exactly.

    Why are only nursing staff required to wear these things?

    They are putting this system in our ER right now. I have a feeling it's not going to go over so well. You know how we crotchety ER nurses are...
  10. by   weirdRN
    I beleive for the purpose of liability, that the tracking devices may not be such a bad idea for all healthcare employess, Docs included.
  11. by   RNfloatpool
    I had one on once and we were short staffed and I had an alzheimers pt fall and hit his head on the wall. They tried to say that I didn't answer the call light for 45 minutes. I knew that I had checked the time before I went in there and I charted accordingly. The floor eventually got rid of the tracking devices. They are not helpful in the least bit!!!
  12. by   eden
    We are not required to wear them. Only the PP nurses wear them since they are the ones that moved more frequently. Laboring a pt is 1:1 so we know where they are. The reason housekeepers don't use them is because they are of no use to us in an emergency. Can you imagine the housekeeper running in for a delivery, what's she gonna do clean it up? In fact the management has us write down when a pateient leaves and what time housekeepers clean the room. They are reprimanded if they take too long. They are tracked far more then the nurses.
  13. by   Diahni
    Quote from PattonD
    How do you guys feel about wearing tracking devices on your person? Your location displays on a computer screen where you are at inside the hospital at all times.

    Thanks
    Patton D: I'm still in nursing school, and I find them totally creepy. Sure, the explanation makes sense - so people can find you. Then why don't the docs wear them too. Very very 1984, wouldn't you say?
    Diahni

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