New to L&D (Hopefully)

  1. I have an interview on L&D this Thursday. I have 1 1/2 years nursing experience, coming from a peds hem/onc floor. I've always loved L&D but didn't want to start there straight out of school. I wanted some kind of experience under my belt. I'm in a large teaching hospital, so I know I'll see all kinds of cases down there. I'm nervous though. Will I be okay with the experience I have under my belt? Also, a large portion of the patients are hispanic and I don't speak a word of spanish. Any good materials I could buy? Any advice you can give me about working in this unit? Thanks so much!

    Amber
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   jaimealmostRN
    Hey Amber, I don't have any advice about working on an L&D floor. But I read one of your previous posts about not being happy on the peds floor and perhaps it was related to your age, etc. I am also 22 and graduate this December (knock on wood!), and look just as young! I'm not bragging b/c I know that this can be detrimental sometimes. Usually patients are happy to see some one "my daughter's age" who appears smart and professional. But I get it all the time from other staff member who think just b/c I'm young (and you too from your post) I don't know my stuff! I just want to wish you good luck! :hatparty: You'll be awesome on L&D. Just have lots of confidence when you go to your interview and tell them you'll willing and open to learning experiences. Good luck and let us know what happens.
  4. by   CA CoCoRN
    I'm glad that you have experience BEFORE going to an L&D floor. I hope your assessment skills have been honed to a fine point. In L&D, you have two patients in each bed: MOM and BABY. (Not to mention the family dynamics of each particular situation.) You'll have to be able to assess the condition of each, both independent of each other and dependent on the other and make decisions based on what's best for one or both. It's an art.

    If you know what you're doing, develop skill and confidence, I'm sure you'll do fine. Learn your stuff, and have fun. In a teaching hospital, you'll certainly learn lots...and hopefully all the residents won't take all the critical experience from you. At my hospital, we're private, non-teaching, and the nurses do everything but deliver (well, a lot of times, due to timing and maternal/fetal factors we do deliver ). We do IUPC/FSE insertion too, which I've found many places don't have the nurses do. The only thing we don't do is insert the first Cervidil/Cytotec/prostagladin.

    Just relax, breathe, ask questions, watch, learn and hopefully you will love it as much as I do.
  5. by   PedsNurse1981
    Quote from jaimealmostRN
    Hey Amber, I don't have any advice about working on an L&D floor. But I read one of your previous posts about not being happy on the peds floor and perhaps it was related to your age, etc. I am also 22 and graduate this December (knock on wood!), and look just as young! I'm not bragging b/c I know that this can be detrimental sometimes. Usually patients are happy to see some one "my daughter's age" who appears smart and professional. But I get it all the time from other staff member who think just b/c I'm young (and you too from your post) I don't know my stuff! I just want to wish you good luck! :hatparty: You'll be awesome on L&D. Just have lots of confidence when you go to your interview and tell them you'll willing and open to learning experiences. Good luck and let us know what happens.
    Thank you for your kind words. From what you've said, and your profile we sound a lot alike. I don't have many nurse friends outside the hospital, so if you'd be interested in staying in touch, email me. amberep@msn.com
  6. by   BETSRN
    L&D is a critical care area and I feel that experience before starting there is critical (although many would disagree with me). Good luck and take your time learning. It takes a good year after your orientation to even begin to feel comfortable with L&D. never be afraid to askl questions and ask the more experienced nurses to help you. We were all new once.

    Make sure your unit gives you a lot of good training in fetal monitoring by an expert: not juts some experienced nurse they choose to use. Your license is always on the line: especially in obstetrics.

    I hope you love it as much as I do. I've been in this field for almost 20 years now.

    Betsy (in Connecticut) :hatparty:
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Sorry got to do it; I disagree with Bets. I started in OB RIGHT OUT OF nursing school (LDRP concept) and did it all .....I learned on my feet, the good ole fashioned way. By being a sponge, asborbing all I could, and working VERY hard. Yes it can be done; I am a very good Labor and Delivery nurse after nearly 7 years out of school. I say do NOT worry; go for it and just do your best. ANYTHING can be done IF you are HAPPY in what you are doing and feel PURPOSE in it each day. I know for a fact it can be done; I am living proof!!!

    BEST WISHES AND LET US KNOW HOW YOU ARE!
  8. by   jaimealmostRN
    Amber, I'll definatly e-mail you sometime. Mine is allphzyxc@aol.com (just so you don't think it's spam) I'd love to hear about what it's REALLY like that first year out of school. Talk to you soon
  9. by   PedsNurse1981
    I don't know what happened!

    The nurse recruiter called me this morning and said that the manager of L&D had called her to say she wasn't interested in interviewing me because of her high number of applicants and not enough positions. What the heck?! From what two of the nursing supervisors had told me, I was one step ahead of the game because they had put in a good word for me and since I had actually gone down there on my off shift to shadow, I got to meet a lot of the nurses and one of the charge nurses and they really liked me. Both supervisors were sure I had the job in the bag. Now this! I don't know how I should feel or where to go from here. I'm completely miserable on the floor I'm on right now. I dread every day that I have to go into work there (read some of my other posts and you'll find out why). I feel like I wasn't even given a fair chance for this job. Also, there are a ton of travelers down there. I'm sure they would rather pay a permanent person to have that position instead of letting them continue to renew their contracts. Where do I go from here?

    Extremely stresses and let down,
    Amber
  10. by   Nur_1996
    OK I know you feel really bad right now, but everything happens for a reason. Maybe it was'nt a good change right now. Thank them for the interview, and let them know you are still interested if a postion becomes available. Is there any other hospitals in your area hiring for L&D? That may be a option. Just step back and hold on, good things will come your way. Marie
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I am sorry. But you MUST NOT give up......try again when another position or opportunity comes up. and it WILL. Trust me. SO sorry (((hugs)))

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