New OB Nurses, Grads and Students, Please Feel Free to post your questions here: - page 31

Mugwump had a great idea offering services to new grads as a mentor (thank you for that!) So, I thought having a "sticky" for new grads, OB nurses, students, and others with questions who want... Read More

  1. by   chuckc
    Quote from munch99
    i am having trouble deciding if i should become a nurse first (rn) and work at a gynecology office or if i should go straight to becoming a gynecologist! if anybody has any thoughts or tips please let me know!
    thanks muchly!:spin:
    please do not take offense to this but by the sound of your post you have no idea what either one of those careers is about. i was a medical assistant in an ob/gyn office before, now i am about to be an rn. it sounds as if the two can be compared, they can not. being an rn and being an m.d. are both wonderful but very different paths. please consult your college counselor regarding both options, research as much as possible. if you are just looking to work in a medical office, usually they hire medical assistants, not rns. make no mistake that a medical assistant and rn are not one in the same. you will find numerous posts on this subject! good luck to you on your future studies!
  2. by   musicalnursynurse
    it's better to have a float than no nurse isn't it, our floats only work post partum, and we have a lot of availability (like me as I have a full time post in another hospital for the OR) SO I work every other week end.
    I got in by chance on the float team and then by taking replacements untill I got a post. (unfortunalty the pull for OR was too great)
  3. by   dnw826
    Hi. I have a question. I have always wanted to be a L&D nurse, and eventually a midwife. I have shadowed in L&D and have three children of my own. I am a huge lactivist, and I am in the huge minority in all the places that I have lived by breastfeeding my children. At the last hospital I worked at, I did a lot of shadowing in the L&D unit (as well as where I delivered all of my children) and I was amazed how much bottle feeding was pressed on new mothers.

    Luckily we had a lactation consultant that is new there and is a pretty good resource for encouraging breastfeeding-if you request her as soon as you deliver. But the nurses still insist on using pacifiers and giving bottles. I know that I would never do that, myself, as a nurse with a newborn, and I know that it is hard for me, personally, to understand elective bottlefeeding. Is it unethical to try to talk to your patients about breastfeeding? I would never force them to do something they do not want to do, so I don't mean forcefully.

    I just know that most people are very staunchly pro-bottlefeeding, and I do not want a confrontation with my teacher in clinicals, or with other nurses on the floor. I know it seems like this rambling is not going anywhere, but are there any lactivists on here? How do you deal with it every (working)day?
  4. by   prmenrs
    Often it's not a matter of being "staunchly" pro- or con- one thing of the other. There are so many other factors involved. Let me describe just one of them:

    The hospital @ which I work sees probably 80% or more Hispanic families. Moms tend to be a little younger, not much, and most do not attend birthing classes (@ least as far as I can tell). They usually say they want to "breast and bottle" feed their babies, and when you try to get baby going right after delivery, they want a bottle because "I don't have no milk". Or, if the child is the least bit uncooperative (and some of them are pretty vocal about it), they may say, "S/He doesn't want me!!".

    Extended female relatives are there in force, w/varying degrees of support. They're all worried that the babies will starve if not given 2 oz of formula w/in the 1st 24 hours. And, believe me, they DO expect to get the diaper bag w/the goodies in it that's provided by the formula companies.

    And, don't forget, almost all babies and moms get discharged promptly after their minimal 24-48 hour stay. Nurses don't have a whole lot of time to educate and facilitate -- frequently in what is, @ best, lousy Spanish.

    We have ONE lactation nurse. She is awesome. But, she is not there 24/7; and if staffing is short, she can and will be pulled. Then she has her assignment and lactation demands.

    I can wind up spending a whole lot of my day bent in a awkward position (my 60 y/o fat body gets a little sore!) grabbing a perfect stranger's breast and trying to get a stubborn, screaming little newborn to realize he's supposed to like it. I know a fair amount of tricks, too. It still doesn't always work out. And, don't forget, I have 5 OR MORE other newborns to assess, Newborn Screens and hearing tests to do, and patient teaching to do and document, yada, yada.

    (as a "by-the-way", I had a mom recently who was Hep C+, and who really wanted to breastfeed. Wouldn't you know she had cracked nipples?? Can we say ethical dilemma?)

    I admire your passion, and, in a perfect world, ALL hospitals would carry the designation of "Baby Friendly", and baby formula would be reserved for babies for whom there are limited choices and/or special needs. I believe in it, I'm VERY pro-breastfeeding. I'm also a realist.

    It's one thing to be "shadowing" and observing. It's another thing to have full responsibility for the assignment. Please, just keep that in mind, ok??
  5. by   VickyRN
    Quote from dnw826
    Hi. I have a question. I have always wanted to be a L&D nurse, and eventually a midwife. I have shadowed in L&D and have three children of my own. I am a huge lactivist, and I am in the huge minority in all the places that I have lived by breastfeeding my children. At the last hospital I worked at, I did a lot of shadowing in the L&D unit (as well as where I delivered all of my children) and I was amazed how much bottle feeding was pressed on new mothers.

    Luckily we had a lactation consultant that is new there and is a pretty good resource for encouraging breastfeeding-if you request her as soon as you deliver. But the nurses still insist on using pacifiers and giving bottles. I know that I would never do that, myself, as a nurse with a newborn, and I know that it is hard for me, personally, to understand elective bottlefeeding. Is it unethical to try to talk to your patients about breastfeeding? I would never force them to do something they do not want to do, so I don't mean forcefully.

    I just know that most people are very staunchly pro-bottlefeeding, and I do not want a confrontation with my teacher in clinicals, or with other nurses on the floor. I know it seems like this rambling is not going anywhere, but are there any lactivists on here? How do you deal with it every (working)day?
    Please don't let that one bad experience at that one hospital jade you. All hospitals are different. The huge teaching hospital in my area is very PRO-breastfeeding and employs SEVERAL lactation consultant RN's on staff (one recently traveled to Mexico for a few months to become fluent in Spanish and is an excellent resource with the new Hispanic mothers). They are working towards becoming an exclusively breastfeeding hospital (forget the term) with no pacifiers, no free formula sample kits, etc., on site. This hospital's policy is to actively promote breastfeeding. Most nursing instructors in my area are breastfeeding advocates. When I have my students on the postpartum floor, we encourage breastfeeding. If the mother has chosen to bottle-feed, then we support her. If the mother is not sure, then we promote breastfeeding. We also refer to the lactation specialists whenever possible, for backup.
  6. by   MIA-RN1
    Quote from dnw826
    Hi. I have a question. I have always wanted to be a L&D nurse, and eventually a midwife. I have shadowed in L&D and have three children of my own. I am a huge lactivist, and I am in the huge minority in all the places that I have lived by breastfeeding my children. At the last hospital I worked at, I did a lot of shadowing in the L&D unit (as well as where I delivered all of my children) and I was amazed how much bottle feeding was pressed on new mothers.

    Luckily we had a lactation consultant that is new there and is a pretty good resource for encouraging breastfeeding-if you request her as soon as you deliver. But the nurses still insist on using pacifiers and giving bottles. I know that I would never do that, myself, as a nurse with a newborn, and I know that it is hard for me, personally, to understand elective bottlefeeding. Is it unethical to try to talk to your patients about breastfeeding? I would never force them to do something they do not want to do, so I don't mean forcefully.

    I just know that most people are very staunchly pro-bottlefeeding, and I do not want a confrontation with my teacher in clinicals, or with other nurses on the floor. I know it seems like this rambling is not going anywhere, but are there any lactivists on here? How do you deal with it every (working)day?
    At my hospital, we have several lactation consultants who make rounds on all the moms who are breastfeeding and it really helps. We are certainly a pro-breastfeeding group but that doesn't mean that we are against the bottle. We have moms who choose to bottle feed for various reasons and thats ok too. I personally believe that breast is best but as a nurse, I cannot judge nor tell someone what to do. So I accept their decisions and help them get going with whichever method they choose. There are cultural differences, age differences, physiological differences that influence the mother's choices. As the nurse, I need to support and advocate for my patient even if I don't necessarily agree with her choice because it is her choice. I can ask her if she is breast or bottle but I can't tell her she should breastfeed. I can explain the benefits of breastfeeding if she is questioning but I can't approach a bottle-feeding mother and tell her she should breast feed.
  7. by   dnw826
    I would never judge someone for not breastfeeding. So I don't mean that I would treat my patients different! I just meant more with hospitals which are like the ones that I mentioned. All of the OB nurses that I have known and worked with (I worked in an RE office) were very pro-BF. Except at that one hospital. I guess that I just needed to know that they aren't all like that!

    As a side note, what do you have to do to become a lactation consultant?Is it a master's program? I was looking into becoming a midwife or WHNP after I get some experience on the floor. Being a midwife runs in my family and I would love to do a mixture of midwifery and general gyn visits-like teen outreach and community education, etc.

    What exactly do WHNP do? I have seen some very general descriptions. Thanks again!
  8. by   prmenrs
    If you want to be a lactation consultant, check w/the local La Leche league to see where courses are. In my experience, they aren't cheap. So be prepared for that!
  9. by   MIA-RN1
    Quote from dnw826
    I would never judge someone for not breastfeeding. So I don't mean that I would treat my patients different! I just meant more with hospitals which are like the ones that I mentioned. All of the OB nurses that I have known and worked with (I worked in an RE office) were very pro-BF. Except at that one hospital. I guess that I just needed to know that they aren't all like that!

    As a side note, what do you have to do to become a lactation consultant?Is it a master's program? I was looking into becoming a midwife or WHNP after I get some experience on the floor. Being a midwife runs in my family and I would love to do a mixture of midwifery and general gyn visits-like teen outreach and community education, etc.

    What exactly do WHNP do? I have seen some very general descriptions. Thanks again!
    I am not sure about a WHNP but I did look into the lactation consultant info at my hospital. There is a one-week class to be certified as a lactation counselor, I got a brochure from www.healthychildren.cc (The center for breastfeeding) To be a lactation counselor, it is a more big deal and I know that you have to have a degree of hours as well as take boards. I think that is thru the ILCAC (? I might have those letters mixed up).
    Good luck!
  10. by   enfermeraSG
    Quote from dnw826
    I would never judge someone for not breastfeeding. So I don't mean that I would treat my patients different! I just meant more with hospitals which are like the ones that I mentioned. All of the OB nurses that I have known and worked with (I worked in an RE office) were very pro-BF. Except at that one hospital. I guess that I just needed to know that they aren't all like that!

    As a side note, what do you have to do to become a lactation consultant?Is it a master's program? I was looking into becoming a midwife or WHNP after I get some experience on the floor. Being a midwife runs in my family and I would love to do a mixture of midwifery and general gyn visits-like teen outreach and community education, etc.

    What exactly do WHNP do? I have seen some very general descriptions. Thanks again!
    I don't know about the lactation consultant, but midwife is a master's program. Midwifes handle office/clinic visits and do the prenatal care for their pts, plus come to the deliveries. WHNP (I'm assuming that is Women's Health Nurse Practitioner) only do the the office/clinic stuff - in other words they aren't catching babies. SG
  11. by   mitchsmom
    Quote from dnw826
    As a side note, what do you have to do to become a lactation consultant? Is it a master's program?
    It is not a master's program; the guidelines for becoming a lactation consultant are found at the IBLCE (The International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners):
    http://www.iblce.org/
    (click on the "certification" tab)

    Here's the link for "Becoming a Lactation Consultant":
    http://www.iblce.org/become.htm

    Here is some of the requirement info:
    To be eligible to be a candidate for the exam, you must:

    -either be an appropriately qualified health professional (see website)
    OR have completed background education in certain disciplines (see website; includes anatomy and physiology, sociology, Psychology, counseling or communication skills, child development, nutrition, medical terminology);

    -have completed comprehensive continuing education in lactation (see website- a minimum of 45 hours of continuing education in lactation (CERPS) reflecting the exam blueprint); and

    -have had extensive practical experience providing breastfeeding counseling.
    For this part, most people fall under one of the two following pathways, although there are 5 pathways and two more supplementary paths:
    Pathway A – 2500 BC (breastfeeding counseling) hours required.
    This pathway is available only if you have successfully completed at least 4 full years (120 semester hours) of post-secondary education, OR you have a bachelor or higher degree (in any field).
    Pathway B – 4000 BC hours required.
    This pathway is available if you have successfully completed at least 2 full years (60 semester hours) of post-secondary academic credit OR you have an associate degree OR you are a diploma RN.

    Another thing people ask about a lot is "what should I read"? Here is the IBLCE's suggested reading list:
    http://www.iblce.org/reading%20list.htm

    Here's ILCA's (International Lactation Consultant Association) list of lactation course providers:
    http://www.ilca.org/education/courselistings.php

    Best wishes - feel free to pm or email me if I can maybe help you-
    "mitchsmom", IBCLC, RLC
  12. by   readysetgo
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Mugwump had a great idea offering services to new grads as a mentor (thank you for that!)

    So, I thought having a "sticky" for new grads, OB nurses, students, and others with questions who want to post these can do so here. We also seem to see many of the same questions over and over, so perhaps this would help serve as an ongoing discussion of common issues/questions we all seem to have on our minds. This could serve not just for those asking directly, but others who may be "lurking" and looking for information or considering a career in OB, newborn, GYN nursing, or midwifery, doula services, childbirth education, lactation consulting, or other related work.

    So if any mod thinks this is a good idea, mind stickying this?


    Let's give this a go and see how it works out. We have many potential "mentors" here among us who, I am sure, would LOVE to help a new nurse/midwife/doula or student on his or her way to a rewarding career. I know I would love to help out!
    I have a question.
    If baby weighs 6000 grams, How many kg is that and how did you solve?
    Show me, please.

    I got 7.7 kg and the right answer is 6 kg according to the test I took.
    Thanks for your help.
  13. by   wannabpeds
    HI
    i am a nursing student and was wondering do you ever get fake pregnacies. a few of my friends have this where their bodies have tricked them into believing that they are pregnant even though they did nothing to get this way.any info on this would be appreciated

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