New OB Nurses, Grads and Students, Please Feel Free to post your questions here: - page 20

Mugwump had a great idea offering services to new grads as a mentor (thank you for that!) So, I thought having a "sticky" for new grads, OB nurses, students, and others with questions who want... Read More

  1. by   mkc7573
    I have been working with them (health dept. planned parenthood ect.) I have found however that people are not as generous as I had hoped to help when it comes to nursing school projects. They seem to "run the other way" I just thought that this chat room was adding to the information I could gather.
  2. by   mugwump
    Alright new to L&D feel like I need to be more "anal" in my writing down. I hate to feel like I'm "going to mommy" when I go to my preceptor to see if what I've written is OK (I know thats her job and mine to learn just having a hard time with not knowing and forgetting what to write) so to combat this I am going to make a "cheat sheat" of things that i want to make sure I document for delivery/recovery for instance pt in sturups pt out of stirups, foley dc'd pt peri care done etc.... What things do you make sure you chart on. That way I can make a "reminder list" instead of trying to remember what i've done (Charting as I do it is not really an option right now)
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from alongbella
    I am 43 and a new graduate and RN (YEAH-75 questions!!) Anyways, I have been offered a L&D position (which is the job I wanted) in a small hospital. I am VERY excited. :hatparty: I would like some advice. This hospital, because they are small, has about 10 beds on the L&D floor. On that same floor, they have mother/baby, the nursery-though I was told babies who are getting better stay, those getting sicker are "out of here", C-sections are done on the floor, over flow woman's surgery comes to the floor, big sister and big brother classes are done there and there is a porta cabin outside used to do community outreach, ie pregnancy tests, weigh ins etc. The floor nurses rotate between all the areas. I think this will be a great area for me and there is so much going on but.....
    My question is, What do I concentrate on first? I guess I'm looking for any advise that any of you more experienced nurses have. Thanks!:uhoh21:
    I think it is great......LDRP is what I trained and what I do today. I would, if you have a choice, start in PP or Mother-baby care first. Learn your trade, caring for healthy couplets for a while---then move on to Labor/Delivery and eventually , special care of nursery babies. I also learned how to care for post-op GYN patients along the way.

    I hope the place you will work has a really good and long orientation for new people-----and buddy system. If so, you will do fine.

    Again, LDRP is the way to go, for me. I wish you the best of luck and plesae keep us updated on how it goes!!! Congrats on graduating and welcome to OB/GYN nursing.
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from jeshav27
    Hello. I had a question regarding internal fetal scalp monitors. Is it only legal for physicians and nurse midwives to attach a internal fetal scalp monitor or can nurses perform this task?? If a nurse can, is it only certain hospital that won't allow a nurse to perform this task?

    Thank you in advance.
    Really depends on where you work. Check w/the policies/procedures of your hospital----and your state nurse practice acts. Where I am, not only is it legal, but we are expected to place our own internal monitors, to include FSE and IUPC--once trained and certified competent by our preceptor. In the end, it's up to the hospital and its policies, as to WHO places internal monitors.
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from lillybear
    My first posting, hope this works!

    The world of birth has beckoned me for several years. i have a holistic doula and lay midwifery background which I am currently integrating with a RN degree.

    My first clinical rotation worked out beautifully to be ob/peds. i feel inspired and trustworthy that i would like to pursue a CNM degree, despite warnings from teachers to take time in deciding a speciality. RN is a second degree for me, and i am a bit older (later 20's) than most of my junior classmates.
    All of these factors infuence my future education and career plans.

    I know first semeter of jr. year is early to make any concrete career plans, but school will whiz by and I want to consider summer apprenticeship plans.

    I pose my question to the experienced and nubian nurses among you... when is too early to decide to specialize in Midwifery/L&D? Did you as a L&D nurse or CNM always have a deep intuition that BIRTH is where you wanted to practice? What are the best ways for me to pursue this path and gain a realistic view into the CNM/L&D nursing world?

    Thanks for your advice!
    It is not too early at all. Some of us KNEW before even entering nursing school what our calling was. It sounds like you do, too. If you want to specialize, then go for it. NEVER TOO EARLY. Try to get experience as an L/D nurse before you go onto CNM/nurse midwifery. The experience you gain will be so useful on that path. GO FOR IT!
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from mkc7573
    I have been working with them (health dept. planned parenthood ect.) I have found however that people are not as generous as I had hoped to help when it comes to nursing school projects. They seem to "run the other way" I just thought that this chat room was adding to the information I could gather.
    PM me and I will see if I can help you.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from mugwump
    Alright new to L&D feel like I need to be more "anal" in my writing down. I hate to feel like I'm "going to mommy" when I go to my preceptor to see if what I've written is OK (I know thats her job and mine to learn just having a hard time with not knowing and forgetting what to write) so to combat this I am going to make a "cheat sheat" of things that i want to make sure I document for delivery/recovery for instance pt in sturups pt out of stirups, foley dc'd pt peri care done etc.... What things do you make sure you chart on. That way I can make a "reminder list" instead of trying to remember what i've done (Charting as I do it is not really an option right now)

    I keep all the info on a given patient on a clipboard......for Labor/delivery. On that clipboard, you will find her labor flow sheet, intake physical assessment/history sheet, MAR, IV flow sheet, and important labs. This clip board is my "brain" from which I give report or use to give updates to physicians on my patients. It really works! For PP, I just keep notes on my report sheet---like labs, meds, vital signs, I/O (if needed) and info on how baby is doing (we do couplet care). I use that sheet throughout the shift to add info as it goes, and that is what I give report from, when change of shift is going on.
  8. by   Goldenhare
    Thanks Deb. I am really excited and nervous to be starting. I originally wanted to be a nurse the first time through college, but due to some bad advising........well.......Then I married a field engineer and tried 3 times to go to nursing school, but we kept moving. He finally decided to stay put so I could finish school, turning down 3 job transfers in the process. So here I am!
    I am trying really hard not to be too nervous. My orientation is in a couple of weeks. I do not have hospital experience other than clinicals, and many of our instructors are TOTALLY against new nurses in L&D (etc.) I really didn't think I could do a year of med/surg floor nursing. Its ok but my heart isn't in it. I have always been fascinated by L&D. I had both of my kids in the UK with midwives only, no doctors, and all of my midwives were really good and inspiring. One of the nurses and I are still in touch. Then I got to do L&D clinicals here in the states and I just got more and more intrigued. So I thought, "If I can find a hospital that wants to hire me despite me being a new grad, then why not? I've waited so long for this, why not?" So I signed the paper work on Friday, and now I'm starting to think, "Good grief, I must be crazy!"
    Anyways, I will have one preciptor 98% of the time, and the initial training period on the floor is 14 weeks. I'm hoping the consistancy will be a great advantage. I'm pretty sure I will be starting with couplet care. So that will be ok. I'll know more in a few weeks. I'll keep you posted. In the meantime, keep those suggestions coming!!! I really want to be happy and useful in this choice!! and not like that!!
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    GOOD LUCK! Let us know if we can help you.
  10. by   prettybutterfly
    I want to ask some questions for a class that I have.
    1. What educational requirements are neccesary for this occupation?
    2. What schools offer training in this field?
    3. What are the personal qualifications neccesary for this occupation?
    4. Is on-the-job training or apprenticeship required?
    5. Are special licenses or certificates required?
    6. What salary can you expect to start at? What is a top salary for this field?
    7. Where do people in this field find employment?
    8. What is the job outlook for this field?
    9. What are some of the advantages of a career in this field?
    10. What are some of the disadvantages?
    If you could please answer these questions for me, I would be elated. It will also help me alot in succeeding in my schooling for a better career.
    Thank you, prettybutterly.
    Last edit by prettybutterfly on Oct 27, '05 : Reason: wrong title
  11. by   prettybutterfly
    I need to ask some questions involving the ob nurse field for a class:

    1. What educational requirements are neccesary for this occupation?
    2. What schools offer training in this field?
    3. What are the personal qualifications neccesary for this occupation?
    4. Is on-the-job training or apprenticeship required?
    5. Are special licenses or certificates required?
    6. What salary can you expect to start at? What is a top salary for this field?
    7. Where do people in this field find employment?
    8. What is the job outlook for this field?
    9. What are some of the advantages of a career in this field? What are some of the disadvantages?

    If you could please answer these questions for me, I would be elated. It will help me a lot in my schooling for a better career. Thank you, prettybutterfly
  12. by   bopper2
    New to this thread...
    Last edit by bopper2 on Oct 29, '05
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I need to ask some questions involving the ob nurse field for a class:




    2. What schools offer training in this field?

    You go to NURSING SCHOOL first, at a technical school or college/university. THEN you choose OB as your specialty after graduation. Some hospitals hiring new graduates then offer residency programs where you learn your specialty---or you are assigned a preceptor to work with you and train you on the job. www.allnursingschools.com is a good site to find the various nursing schools in the USA by program/degree.


    3. What are the personal qualifications neccesary for this occupation?

    You need credentials such as LPN or RN, schooled as above. Preferably, RN since many units no longer hire LPNs in labor and delivery. I am not starting an LPN versus RN debate, just stating what I have found is true these days. You also need to be quick on your feet and have the ability to critically think outside the box. You need to be self-motivated, hardworking and have integrity. You also need to be able to keep your cool head in emergencies and have compassion for your patients/families.


    4. Is on-the-job training or apprenticeship required?
    As above, you can receive preceptorship or residency at the hospital that hires you. You would need to inquire about specifics of the nurse manager or Human Resources Dept. as to specifics. ALWAYS, there will be on the job training required as well as ongoing training to keep current.

    5.

    Are special licenses or certificates required?

    As above, you need your RN or LPN and then yes, some post-hire certifications and training such as NRP (neonatal resuscitation) and Fetal Heart Monitoring, Lactation Education, etc. There is a requirement for constant and ongoing education and training as long as you work as a nurse.

    6. What salary can you expect to start at?

    You would need to inquire at the HR department of the hospital you plan to seek employment. It varies by location and state. Or go to: www.salary.com for general answers.

    What is a top salary for this field?

    Same answer as above.

    7. Where do people in this field find employment?

    www.hospitalsoup.com will show you where hospitals are and you can find out their HR department numbers/websites for further inquiry.


    8. What is the job outlook for this field?

    Very good in nursing in general. The projected outlook is good, primarily as "baby boomer" nurses retire in huge numbers, and people live longer.


    9. What are some of the advantages of a career in this field? What are some of the disadvantages?

    Well you can start to answer this yourself by reading the many threads in this forum. This is such a huge question. Legal liability is a big drawback----as is overwork and understaffing. But the advantage is I get to be part of new families being born. That makes it all worth it.


    If you could please answer these questions for me, I would be elated. It will help me a lot in my schooling for a better career. Thank you, prettybutterfly :thankya

    You are welcome. Good luck.

    Deb, Moderator, OB/GYN/Midwifery Forum

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