New OB Nurses, Grads and Students, Please Feel Free to post your questions here: - page 12

Mugwump had a great idea offering services to new grads as a mentor (thank you for that!) So, I thought having a "sticky" for new grads, OB nurses, students, and others with questions who want... Read More

  1. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from crystalbluern
    Just a question...OB L&D nurses working on LDRP units...how many of you are regularly circulating in the operating room during C-Sections. How do you manage staffing, especially when you have to have at least one other nurse for the baby, if the Pediatrician is there also. We also manage any "sick babies" in our Intensive Care Nursery on the unit, and we are doing our recoveries on our unit also. We recently combined our L&D and post partum units to LDRPs and we lost several nurse positions at that time.
    LDRP unit nurse here. We all circulate csections as well as manage labor/delivery and PP/newborn care. We also care for post-op GYN patients---we are jacks-of-all-trades, as you can see.

    It can be a juggle, if an emergent/urgent csection is needed. What we often do at night, is have the house supe send up a person (or he/she will do it)---- to manage phones and help the other nurse(s) manage the floor/answer call lights for the 30-45 min it takes to do the csection. It's a challenge, to say the least. If there is a baby in the level-2 nursery, once the csection baby is delivered, the baby goes back to the nursery with the nurse in there. If not, the baby goes to the LDRP room with the dad/ significant other, if stable. That then frees up the nurse who "caught" the baby to go back to the floor to help out, while the circulator finishes up the case and recovers the mom that first post-op hour. The cirulator also monitors the baby in the room, with mom, if both are stable.

    Needless to say, All of this is MUCH simpler to do with scheduled csections-----sometimes quite hard when an urgent/emergent case presents unannounced or is going on. If it's a change-of-shift deal, usually at least one nurse from the prior/coming shift jumps in to help out. It takes a lot of teamwork to make it all work, but we generally handle it very well.

    I would love to know more about your staffing patterns to see if there is more I can suggest to help you. Hope what I posted here helps some.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Jul 1, '05
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Carolyn Hepp
    The hospital I'm interested in is offering a Labor and Delivery Internship for a 20 week course. Has anyone out there ever attended such a course? Also, in order to be chosen for this internship, you have to go before a panel of eight (8) people for the initial interview!!!! Has anyone out there ever been before a panel of eight for an interview for an internship?... I'm currently a psych RN and looking to change my field. Can you believe it....eight.... I'm scared out of my wits!!!! What type of questions could they ask?? I don't think I've ever been asked eight questions in a normal interview for a job let alone EIGHT people on a panel..
    HELP!!!!
    Please, dont' let it freak you out. Remember why you want this job and be honest with yourself and the interviewers. Some places, the charge nurses all interview potential employees---- talk about nerve-wracking. It's like being on "display" for a bunch of aunctioneers, rofl.

    But, I always just thought of it as MY chance to interview THEM---to see if such a place was as good a fit for ME as I would be for them....... I always had questions handy about staffing patterns, policies/procedures and the like. I never let 1,2 or 8 people make me that nervous.

    Internship is the way to go. OMG How I WISH I had had such a great introduction to L/D nursing. (I had just 3 months of very fast-paced and difficult OJT with varying nurses---no "mentor", no classes, just lots of stuff thrown at me that first year as a nurse. I don't recommend this for anyone---it nearly made me rethink being a nurse at all.

    So, If you can get this, it is truly a golden opportunity. What a wonderful way to learn LDRP nursing. GOOD LUCK!!!!!
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Lady_Rebel
    Hi I have a couple of questions. Please don't think I am stupid for asking this I am a pre-nursing student but is a Doula a nurse midwife? My second question is the hospital I want to work at does not allow grads. to go start into L/D until we have experience has a nurse so what department do ya'll think would help me get prepared for L/D? I was thinking of working on the med surgery floor. Would something like ER be better.My third question is how do you get certified to be a mide wife?Also any tips for a beginnig student.
    NO questions are stupid. Welcome to the OB/GYN nursing forums. Feel free to ask anything if it comes up, ok?
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Lady_Rebel
    Thank you for answering my questions.
    I just want to add: some people DO start in L/D right out of school. I did . If you elect to do so, I highly recommend you start out in a hospital that has extensive residencies/internship programs. These combine classroom training and lining you up with nurse-mentors/trainers to learn the ropes in OB nursing. Usually, you would be assigned to follow one or two nurses during this period of training.

    ALWAYS ----ALWAYS when considering an offer or position, ask about how nurses are oriented to OB nursing. If it's less than 3-6 months, full-time, it's not nearly enough, and you would be wise to pass on it until you have been a nurse a year or two--- at least.

    Like Betsy said, it's great if you can start out in Post-partum or Mother-Baby first, then learn labor and delivery later. That is ideal, particularly for new graduates. Orientation/residency is critical. Don't settle for less than a rock-solid orientation to ANY job in nursing that first year out of school. There is SO MUCH to learn that first year.

    Good luck to you!
  5. by   RNnL&D
    Quote from crystalbluern
    Just a question...OB L&D nurses working on LDRP units...how many of you are regularly circulating in the operating room during C-Sections. How do you manage staffing, especially when you have to have at least one other nurse for the baby, if the Pediatrician is there also. We also manage any "sick babies" in our Intensive Care Nursery on the unit, and we are doing our recoveries on our unit also. We recently combined our L&D and post partum units to LDRPs and we lost several nurse positions at that time.
    Our unit is split between LDRP and PP/GYN. If the LDRP end is full, the PP patients move out after delivery to PP. We have 12 beds in the back that are for L&D, Antepartum, and PP patients. We circulate and scrub for all our sections, and staff our own recovery room. Luckily, we do have RT's at all deliveries, which frees up the delivery nurse to just work with Mom. In a Csection, it's extremely helpful. We only staff at night with 4 nurses for 12 beds and triage. If 3 nurses were in the OR, that would just leave the triage nurse. Our PP nurses from up front do helpout when we are in a bind, as well as our nursing supervisor (some nights). Our other night supervisor is a SCN nurse with no L&D experience. She's technically, not even qualified to watch strips for us when we are busy. :uhoh21:

    Some nights, I'm not sure how we do it, but somehow, we manage. It takes a whole lot of teamwork.
  6. by   countrybear
    I am trying to complete an assignment on Health Issues with a nursing mom:
    The issues are to be what were mutually identified between the new mom and the nurse but I stumped. I think the issues were 1) sore cracked nipples 2) risk of infection from c-sec 3) young mom 21 years of age and little of life's experieces with no comittment from partner 4)increased body temperature due to birth of neonate 5)appropriate diet for nursing new mom

    Within these catagories statagies, rationale and evaluation criteria must be met!............help please...............i'm critcal care nurse not obgyn!.........
    Last edit by countrybear on Jul 11, '05
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    A good nursing care plan book (OB) might help out. I am not sure exactly what is being asked here. Is this a classroom assignment or care plan you are writing?
  8. by   tanelle
    Quote from Nurse032006
    Thanks for the reply...I know what you mean about the BSE and high risk of Cancer, I have a very high risk myself....I think it is sad to see that breast cancer is still so prevalent with all of the imformation and breast cancer awareness out there...it is scary!!!
    I picked this topic because this is the only one that related to my patient...thanks again for the info!!!!!!

    Sherry
    Hello all, I am a brand new rn and I chose to start my new position on a telemetry unit at a large hospital. However, I think I may have made a mistake, as I think that I would like to work in labor and delivery. How long do you think I should work in my current position before I request a transfer? I am afraid that if I start the position and don't really want to be there that it will affect my work. I start this monday 7-25! Any suggestions or advice from the experienced will be appreciated.

    Tanelle
  9. by   BETSRN
    Quote from tanelle
    Hello all, I am a brand new rn and I chose to start my new position on a telemetry unit at a large hospital. However, I think I may have made a mistake, as I think that I would like to work in labor and delivery. How long do you think I should work in my current position before I request a transfer? I am afraid that if I start the position and don't really want to be there that it will affect my work. I start this monday 7-25! Any suggestions or advice from the experienced will be appreciated.

    Tanelle
    6 months, minimum. You have not even started yet. Give it a chance. You need at least a year minimum in labor/delivery before you are even remotely ready to go it on your own. get the background than see how you feel then.
  10. by   tanelle
    Quote from BETSRN
    6 months, minimum. You have not even started yet. Give it a chance. You need at least a year minimum in labor/delivery before you are even remotely ready to go it on your own. get the background than see how you feel then.
    Do you understand my statement? I am not in L &D yet, I would like to go there, but anyway the answer is the same I guess. Six months huh? When I went into ns I had the idea that I would be an l&d nurse then midwife, however after my clinical rotation thru l&D I changed my mind. So then I thought maybe critical care, so I took a job in telemetry, but when I imagine my career throughout my life advancing and moving up I just don't picture myself in critical care.
  11. by   babes690
    hi i am a 2nd year nursing student very interested in gyne and wanting to be come a midwife. my last placement was on gyne and there was the early pregnency assessment unit on the ward for if any pregnant patient up to 18 weeks had any problems. all the time i would see things written live p1g4 and i just wondered what it meant.



    thanks Gemma
  12. by   pie123
    Just wondering. I am a new grad who just passed NCLEX. I recently have begun to think about applying to L&D. I am wondering, those of you who have been L&D nurses for a while ever had any difficulty in finding a job? I had a classmate who was going to pursue L&D but decided not to because she thought she would be "backing herself into a corner" & maybe would not have as many opportunities for employment if she relocated to another state. Because of this, she chose to remain working with adults, as she felt there were more opportunities. Thoughts?
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from tanelle
    Do you understand my statement? I am not in L &D yet, I would like to go there, but anyway the answer is the same I guess. Six months huh? When I went into ns I had the idea that I would be an l&d nurse then midwife, however after my clinical rotation thru l&D I changed my mind. So then I thought maybe critical care, so I took a job in telemetry, but when I imagine my career throughout my life advancing and moving up I just don't picture myself in critical care.
    If you don't picture yourself in critical care, then that is ok. DO NOT GIVE UP....Working hard enough, and keeping your ear to the ground and a good network going, you will land where you feel you belong-------in OB. I did, right out of school even though I was told it would not happen for me. Do not give up.

close