More strange baby names - page 49

just had a unique baby name the other week....thought i'd share, and hope to continue this thread from earlier.... "strange baby names": strawberry :roll (thank goodness this was changed by the... Read More

  1. by   MistyDawnRN06
    I worked in a dental office before going to nursing school. There was a child that was a patient there with the name:
    Princess Fergie of the United States of America
    I'm not joking! This was this the child's legal name!!

    I went to school with a girl named Flor Flores. Also knew a family that was expecting a child to be called Snowy Winter.

    First names I find interesting: Deepa, Meirelys, and Innocent.
  2. by   catlover314
    I heard about a set of twins named Regina and Vagina. Pronounced the second name as Va-geena. Don't know if its true or not.

    Latest unusual name I've seen a couple of times is Neveah. Its "heaven" spelled backward according to the parents who have picked it.
  3. by   TX_Travel_RN
    I worked L&D in southern Cali, and had a family come in to deliver their first child. They were poor illiterate migrant workers, and did not know what to name their son. So Dad had been walking around the nurse's station for awhile that night. The next day, we found out they had named the baby "Nosmo King" (last name withheld). It took us awhile, but we figured out where he got it: the sign at our nurse's station---NO SMOKING. LOL
  4. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from RNLaborNurse4U
    Just had a unique baby name the other week....thought I'd share, and hope to continue this thread from earlier.... "strange baby names":

    Strawberry :roll (thank goodness this was changed by the adoptive parents)


    ~Jennifer
    :chuckle Funny thing is that I went to school with a girl named precious (First name) peaches(middle name). She really didn't mind her name and just laughed about it. Also once knew a girl named Axigery. Kids used to call her spaghetti, she then came up with the nickname Gery and kept it that way.
  5. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from NativeButterfly
    I once checked in twins in the er.....Orangejello and Lemonjello....what was this mom thinking????
    Seems to me that she must have been having strong cravings for Jello while pregnant with them!! :chuckle
  6. by   AKAKatydid
    I worked with a girl named April ... and found out she had a twin sister named May... if that cute enough.. they have 2 middle names each:

    April Dawn Showers
    May Spring Flowers

    Yes, those are their real names... Love it!!!
  7. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from TX_Travel_RN
    I worked L&D in southern Cali, and had a family come in to deliver their first child. They were poor illiterate migrant workers, and did not know what to name their son. So Dad had been walking around the nurse's station for awhile that night. The next day, we found out they had named the baby "Nosmo King" (last name withheld). It took us awhile, but we figured out where he got it: the sign at our nurse's station---NO SMOKING. LOL
    Oh my goodness! I actually knew an illiterate migrant couple when I used to live in Arizona, who named their child Canyon (like the Grand Canyon) and her son Somerton, like the city Somerton. We all felt bad for the children...:chuckle
  8. by   Mimi2RN
    Quote from ahleesejo
    Latest unusual name I've seen a couple of times is Neveah. Its "heaven" spelled backward according to the parents who have picked it.
    We just had one of those but I'm not sure how to pronounce it. I think neveh comes out as "never", hopefully like "never again" :chuckle

    We had the first little "Apple" deliver yesterday, too. I'm sure we'll see more of those.
  9. by   stevierae
    Quote from JessicaGmz
    Oh my goodness! I actually knew an illiterate migrant couple when I used to live in Arizona, who named their child Canyon (like the Grand Canyon) and her son Somerton, like the city Somerton. We all felt bad for the children...:chuckle
    Actually--I kind of like those names. Kind of '60s, hippieish, individualistic. Like the song "Arizona" (girl's name) popular in the late '60s, early '70s. What's that girl's name---help me out here, on "Saved by the Bell--" starts with a "T"--after a Southern California canyon? Very unique; earthy. Oh--I think it's "Topanga."
    Last edit by stevierae on Apr 29, '05
  10. by   stevierae
    Quote from JessicaGmz
    Seems to me that she must have been having strong cravings for Jello while pregnant with them!! :chuckle
    Actually, according to snopes, the choice of these names is always attributed to an illiterate, usually poor minority mom who chose them after looking at her meal choice menus in the hospital, and seeing them listed under desserts (not being able to read) sounded them out phonetically (apparently clueless that she was mispronouncing lemon and lime jello) and thinking that they sounded like good names for twin boys.

    That's why I don't buy the stories that somebody knows somebody that has actually been there when kids have been there and been named that--to me, those stories perpetuate covert prejudice toward poor minorities, particularly those who are illiterate.

    I would think nurses are beyond perpetuating these myths, or, on the slight chance that they are true, ridiculing these people. Why not utilize your teaching skills in these situations--call for an interpreter, if need be--instead of making fun of them?

    Variations on this story go back to the early 1900s.
    Last edit by stevierae on Apr 29, '05
  11. by   Lawnurse
    Quote from stevierae

    That's why I don't buy the stories that somebody knows somebody that has actually been there when kids have been there and been named that--to me, those stories perpetuate covert prejudice toward poor minorities, particularly those who are illiterate.

    I would think nurses are beyond perpetuating these myths, or, on the slight chance that they are true, ridiculing these people. Why not utilize your teaching skills in these situations--call for an interpreter, if need be--instead of making fun of them?

    It seems to me that even someone without a lot of formal education has been in a grocery store and seen the jello box...its not an expensive food. Secondly, when people are sounding out words, they do so by finding a part of the word, or letter, that they do recognize - such as "lemon." It is far more common for people to mispronounce words by accenting the words as if they were two words instead of one. What I'm saying is, its hard to get someone to read lemon jello and mistakening pronounce it the way the legend says. Say it were spelled "lymonzhelo" - there is such word as lemon, there is not such word (in English) as leMON. English speakers would first think of this word as lemon, not leMON. This story also requires that the menu has "lemon jello" erroneously spelled as one word.

    btw - isn't snope a great resource?

    I have been in situations where a name choice seems inappropriate. More often, the way the parents spelled the name does not actually create the name they are pronouncing. I'm a pretty confrontational person, but I was often totally at a loss to try to "teach them" what their baby's name should be.

    Also, sometimes they already know - but have disregarded- what you would "teach" them. I couldn't convince one of my patients (who named her daughter Ms. Kay) that she didn't need to add the "Ms." part because everyone can have the titled mr or ms...
  12. by   sparkyRN
    I can't believe the lemon jello, orange jello and nosmo king stories are still around!
    We heard all those when we were in our first ob clinicals 20+ years ago.
  13. by   NancyJo
    Know a couple who named there daughter Jody and son Joey. Kind of confusing.
    Have a neice Mandolyn and my grandfather was Abslom.

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