Men in OB/Peds Nursing....Any thoughts?.... - page 5

by Wild Irish LPN 9,879 Views | 73 Comments

I remember seeing something posted along these lines a while back, but it never really "got going" so I thought I would open it up for one more try....I am about to finish my LPN Program, and then will be in pursuit of my BSN... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    It's fine to discuss how patients might or might not feel about a man taking care of them. It's also fine to encourage the OP to "go for it". However the only thing that really counts are the nurse managers who will, or far, far more likely, will not offer him a job in OB. I guess it wouldn't hurt to apply, all they can do is say no and who knows? You might just get lucky and apply with one of the tiny minority would would even consider hiring you. The rest will discriminate aginst you based on gender.
    As far as peds goes, well that is very different. Men kick butt in peds and are very well reguarded. Men doing peds face only the normal anti men in nursing bias that is persistant throughout nursing, not the especialy virulent bias faced by men wishing to do OB.
    Thank you for your honesty and heart felt feedback...I guess being that I am a nursing student, I have yet to feel any push back because of my gender...I am sure it happens, just as it happens in the business sector with women....it isn't right, it isn't fair, but it is reality....Peds is a dual passion of mine, perhaps this is a "safer" route to go, but I sure would like to see progress....perhaps I can make some head-way in that direction by excelling in Peds, and use my advocate status speak up for some XY representation in that realm....
  2. 0
    Quote from KareBear0609
    I would refuse any male being in a labor/delivery room with me except my husband.
    I am not trying to provoke you in any negative way, I promise....but can you share with as to why you feel this way?....I am curious....
  3. 1
    Quote from Wild Irish SN
    I am not trying to provoke you in any negative way, I promise....but can you share with as to why you feel this way?....I am curious....
    Maybe she just doesn't feel comfortable with a male stranger looking at her bits? I haven't had children yet, but when I do, I would rather have an older female nurse who has gone through the birthing process than a male nurse who doesn't have a clue about what it is like to be in labor/ be pregnant. And some cultures forbid it. It is something you will have to respect.
    KareBear0609 likes this.
  4. 2
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    an older female nurse who has gone through the birthing process than a male nurse who doesn't have a clue about what it is like to be in labor/ be pregnant.
    Irrelevant. You don't have to die from cancer in order to be qualified to work as an oncology nurse.
    Wild Irish LPN and PMFB-RN like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    Maybe she just doesn't feel comfortable with a male stranger looking at her bits? I haven't had children yet, but when I do, I would rather have an older female nurse who has gone through the birthing process than a male nurse who doesn't have a clue about what it is like to be in labor/ be pregnant. And some cultures forbid it. It is something you will have to respect.
    thanks for your input....but as a nurse do you have to have had a MI to care for a Cardiac patient?, or to have experienced head trauma to care for a car accident victim?....I get it, we are dealing with a woman's body....modesty and our American culture (along with most others) are a bit repressed when it comes to the female anatomy, we almost foster a culture of shame about it and that is due to our nature of sexualizing everything....I guess the way I see it is that it is medical procedure and process....I get that one would like to have an experienced nurse helping them through this time, a nurse who can relate....but you know what?, I am that nurse too....I was with my wife through every phase of our pregnancy and took the ride with her....just because I didn't feel the physiological pain of child birth doesn't mean I couldn't provide outstanding care and empathy, I could....does this really just boil down to the fact of our cultures repressed/dysfunctional feelings about our bodies?.....if so then that is a sad statement in itself.....
    Alikatz likes this.
  6. 4
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    Maybe she just doesn't feel comfortable with a male stranger looking at her bits? I haven't had children yet, but when I do, I would rather have an older female nurse who has gone through the birthing process than a male nurse who doesn't have a clue about what it is like to be in labor/ be pregnant. And some cultures forbid it. It is something you will have to respect.
    *** Hey if a female wishes not to be cared for by a male I am down with it. I understand and will, if possible, arrange for a female nurse. This has happend to me many times during my career and it is understandable and I respect their wishes, if possible.
    However to say a male doesn't have a clue is biased. For example I have never had life support withdrawn on me and died. However I am really good at it and am often requested by our docs when the time comes to withdraw life support. I even wrote the protocal used at my hospital. I am also good at taking care of gun shot wounds. I have been shot myself but I can tell you being shot didn't give me and specific insight to caring for people with gun shot wounds. My training and experience did. There are also some world famous OB-GYN physicians that are male and they don't have any personal experience with delivering a baby or suffering from female only illnessess.
    Alikatz, melmarie23, Bortaz, RN, and 1 other like this.
  7. 3
    I am a labor and delivery/postpartum/newborn nurse, and I have never had a child. But that doesn't mean I can't still take care of women and babies. I think it's wrong to assume that just because you haven't had the experience, you are incapable or not 'compassionate'. Female nurses take care of male patients all the time, yet we don't have a penis.
    melmarie23, PMFB-RN, and Wild Irish LPN like this.
  8. 1
    I was recenetly hired onto a perinatal unit (L&D, post partum, antepartum) with 4 other new grads. One is a male. During our classes he does get asked frequently why he chose OB and his answer is always that he has the passion for this field. When talking to management, the reason they hired him over the other few males that applied was because he showed an unwavering confidence. This seems to be a theme among male perinatal nurses on my unit. Whether they are uncomfortable or not caring for women, they do not show it and always act confidently and professionally. I commend them for their confidence.
    Wild Irish LPN likes this.
  9. 1
    Personally, having given birth twice, it wouldn't matter to me. Gender doesn't matter, it's how well you do your job. During labor all modesty goes out the window. I'm not sure how my husband would react, but as a patient the gender of those caring for me in any aspect doesn't matter.

    If this is truly your passion you shouldn't let a barrier like gender get in your way. You can still make it in this specialty.
    Wild Irish LPN likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from carrie_c
    I am a labor and delivery/postpartum/newborn nurse, and I have never had a child. But that doesn't mean I can't still take care of women and babies. I think it's wrong to assume that just because you haven't had the experience, you are incapable or not 'compassionate'. Female nurses take care of male patients all the time, yet we don't have a penis.
    agreed. some of our best OB nurses are those who have yet to have their own.


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