Men in OB/Peds Nursing....Any thoughts?.... - page 3

by Wild Irish LPN

9,749 Views | 73 Comments

I remember seeing something posted along these lines a while back, but it never really "got going" so I thought I would open it up for one more try....I am about to finish my LPN Program, and then will be in pursuit of my BSN... Read More


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    the somalis i completely understand, and there are other religious or ethnic groups for whom it is anathema for any male beside her husband to see the woman (and female nurses and physicians cannot care for males, so it's at least fair). fortunately, this is usually worked out ahead of time and everyone is ready.

    when i was a student in nineteen-smumblemumble, i had 2 male classmates (class of 135). it was a big stinking deal to get them into the ob floor, and the generally-accepted assumption was that they would never see the inside of a del rooom again unless it was for their own children. thankfully, in the intervening decades things are not that restricted or prejudiced.

    i had a male midwife with my first pregnancy. he wasn't on duty for my labor, but he did do my 14-day postpartum check. great guy-- and did a good job caring for my (completely nonmedical) husband, which was better. if i can adore my kids' male pediatrician (and i did, looked like tom bosley and was an absolute dear), i'd see no problem in adoring a male pediatric nurse practitioner in the same role.

    go for it. let us know how it works out!
  2. 0
    I say go for it. Things are changing world over and since men universally have been the OB/GYNs and women have accepted that for eons, it should not be a problem. That being said, people change slowly so it may take a longer time for administration to realize that men make fantastic nurses in all areas. You may have to help blaze that trail. Good luck.
  3. 2
    Thanks for all the feedback....I understand the cultural customs that some may have, and obviously would be very mindful of that....I have been asked to leave the room once or twice by some modest patients, I get it....however the vast majority of women I have cared for have never said a word, and were interested in what made me want to work as a nurse in the first place....a good ice breaker most of the time....my Maternal/OB instructor asked me to follow my passion, which has surprisingly led to this, when I entered school I figured the ER was more my style....but things change....the biggest payback for me in doing this is certainly not for the paycheck, it would simply be to help a new mom and new life enter the world in the best way possible....if problems should occur along the way I would like to think my calm and professional nature would see them through any crisis, but the thought of bringing new life and joy into the world is my paycheck....it would be an awesome thing....(yes I am aware I am a "idealistic" rookie nurse, but you know what?....that is a great thing....)
    AnonRNC and karamarie91 like this.
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    Thats interesting. I have had four babies, only one of them I had a female physician for the birth. I don't think I really cared either way about my ob/gyns gender. Really, when "push comes to shove" (lol) what you want is the person who is going to do the best job to keep your baby safe at the other end of the bed.
    But.
    But, personally, I might have had a problem with a guy nurse, after all the drama is over. When you are beyond tired, and your girly parts are all swollen and sore and you cant get properly dressed at all and you are trying to learn to breastfeed and you've got all your business hanging out....I might feel a bit more awkward.

    When I delivered my first child, it was an emergency c-section/ cholecystectomy. Incision goes from my sternum all the way down, and I woke up with lots of staples. I was alone in my room, and had a reaction to the pain meds. I couldn't sit up yet, had all the stupid staples, engorged, leaking breasts, half undressed and when I started puking and couldnt stop, I started hitting my nurse button....and I felt sorry for the poor student nurse, who was male, that came in to help me. He was scared, nervous, didnt know where to touch me, stuttering, apologizing for "seeing" me, and although I didnt ask for it, after a few minutes he just bolted out the door. About ten minutes later, a female nurse came in. Apparently, it was his first day. Poor guy. lol
  5. 0
    Quote from osdbmom
    When I delivered my first child, it was an emergency c-section/ cholecystectomy. Incision goes from my sternum all the way down, and I woke up with lots of staples. I was alone in my room, and had a reaction to the pain meds. I couldn't sit up yet, had all the stupid staples, engorged, leaking breasts, half undressed and when I started puking and couldnt stop, I started hitting my nurse button....and I felt sorry for the poor student nurse, who was male, that came in to help me. He was scared, nervous, didnt know where to touch me, stuttering, apologizing for "seeing" me, and although I didnt ask for it, after a few minutes he just bolted out the door. About ten minutes later, a female nurse came in. Apparently, it was his first day. Poor guy. lol
    a day he will certainly remember lol....yep, that is a very vulnerable position for a new mom to be in....trust would have to be established immediately, but I get it....I mean who would really want to be that exposed and vulnerable in front of anyone?....professionalism would have to win the day....
  6. 1
    We did have a male in my LPN class. He was in my clinical group for OB at our clinical site, and he did not seem to have any problems with female patients. They were always asked if it was okay, and they seemed rather curious about a male in Nursing, and how his bedside care would be..

    Me? I'll take a male or a female. As long as you care, treat me well and get my drugs when I am in pain, we will have a great Nurse-patient relationship.

    Besides, your hands are larger, so more surface area to catch the baby in case he/she decides that RIGHT NOW is time to come on out.
    Wild Irish LPN likes this.
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    Hi! So nice to hear that someone else out there is as passionate about OB/Peds work as I am! I want to become a nurse-midwife, and honestly I would have no problem working with male nurses in that department. I have heard men are sometimes more gentler and comforting then women nurses only because they haven't experienced child birth and have full empathy for the woman that is going through it. When I delivered my first child, I had a great experience with my nurses but the second time around it just didn't work. They were so... distant and cold. I remember I had a really hard time naming my second and one of her remarks were: "You've had nine months to figure it out". I couldn't believe it. I think it takes a special kind of man to step up into this line of work. If you feel capable then go for it!

    Now, my husband is very overprotective and if I were to have a male ob/nurse I'm sure he would flip! lol. I wouldn't care but knowing him he would demand a female.
    Wild Irish LPN likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from Wild Irish SN
    I remember seeing something posted along these lines a while back, but it never really "got going" so I thought I would open it up for one more try....I am about to finish my LPN Program, and then will be in pursuit of my BSN starting in August....I am in the midst of my Maternal/OB course and have found that I really love this type of nursing....so fascinating and amazing to me.....until I actually have a rotation in my BSN program, I have no "real world" nursing experience in this realm, my experience is as a Dad of two boys and the shared birth process/pregnancies I had with my wife....I loved every minute of her pregnancy and studied up on all the details as a prospective Dad, I read numerous books on the subjects involved and was rivited....that was long before I considered nursing....

    Now here I am in nursing school and I rediscovered my passion for this amazing event....but I have (maybe in my own mind) a problem....you see, I am a guy....and even though I am open minded and have a passion to pursue this specialty, I feel like it may be poorly accepted by my fellow female classmates, but most importantly my future patients....Is seeing a man in OB nursing really all that odd or out of place?.....be honest, would you have any concerns or modesty if I were to walk into your room to care for you?....or is this just something I need to get over?.....I have loved all my nursing experiences so far, but this is the one area that has really peaked my interest the most....so I open it up to all of you veteran nurses for some good advice, I m all ears.....
    I have worked maternity for years at many hospitals in many states. I have never met a male nurse in the speciality. I wonder if you would get hired? Or if you would be unfairly judged? I wonder if a unit would be willing to make the change or the exception? As a mother, it would not make no difference if a male was my nurse (my OBGYN was) and as a nurse, working with male nurses is always a pleasure. I have seen many guys in the NICU/NBN...thought of that? Good luck!!
  9. 0
    during my OB / Maternal rounds I found that a lot of women at least in the hospital I was at in CA did not want a male nurse in post partum, or L & D. Nursery was a fun time, NICU was great.
  10. 0
    Our hospital has some great male postpartum, nursery and NICU RNs!


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