Men in OB/Peds Nursing....Any thoughts?.... - page 8

I remember seeing something posted along these lines a while back, but it never really "got going" so I thought I would open it up for one more try....I am about to finish my LPN Program, and then... Read More

  1. Visit  Patti_RN profile page
    0
    Hospitals are full of men--and women--who can resuscitate patients of every age.
  2. Visit  rn/writer profile page
    1
    a male nurse in OB (excluding NICU) is like hiring a mechanic who has never driven a car (IMO).
    As others have already said, nurses are not required to have experienced every condition they work with in order to be competent, caring, skillful and wise. Men who have participated in a partner's pregnancy and delivery can certainly bring something to the equation that stands to benefit the birthing family. And even those who haven't done this may be knowledgeable and compassionate and willing to learn.

    On the flip side, just as it's a mistake to insist that males should automatically be excluded from women's health nursing, it's also an error to assume that just being female equips a person to be a good L&D or postpartum nurse. Some women have no desire (or aptitude) for a role in mother/baby nursing. And those who do work in these areas can lose their enthusiasm or be negatively influenced by any number of personal or professional concerns to the point where they are abrupt, insensitive or deficient in the care they provide.

    *********

    On a different note, I have always felt that the fact that male nurses are looked upon differently from male docs lies in the nature of the relationship. No matter how collaborative his practice might be, the male doc--or any doc, for that matter--is looked upon as the one in charge--an authority figure, if you will. And comparatively speaking, he's there for only a short stint. The nurse takes more of a partnering role and usually spends far more time with the patient. There is a short-term bonding, a kind of intimacy and trust that takes place in a good birth situation that doesn't normally occur with the male doc.

    I suspect it is the idea of their partner developing this kind of bonding with another male that some men might find uncomfortable or even threatening. Such an aversion may be tucked behind the obvious reluctance to have another male seeing the laboring mother's anatomy, but in many ways, I think may explain the resistance to male Ob/Gyn nurses when a male OB is seen as acceptable.
    Last edit by rn/writer on May 30, '12
    Esme12 likes this.
  3. Visit  Suburban.Raider.11 profile page
    1
    Quote from Patti_RN
    There is nothing hilarious about privacy issues, cultural issues, or religious preferences. While I had a male obstetrician I understand women who prefer female Ob-gyns and nurses. I worked as a VD counselor years ago and many males came in who requested male docs or nurses. More recently I worked in a family care practice and men coming in for ED wanted a female practioner for their Viagra prescription--it was a matter of male ego that they didn't want to admit to another man that they suffered from impotence. We often have devoutly religious people of both genders who want someone of their own sex caring for them whether or not they are disrobing for care. These preferences are deeply ingrained for personal, cultural, religious or other reasons and it's typically the hospital's decision whether or not to honor these requests; in my experience they usually do honor them.
    Religious and cultural issues are one thing, but thinking that a nurse cares about your parts in anyway other than a professional way is ridiculous. Modesty is modesty. No one is eager to show their parts to a female nurse either but you get over it to have your baby. Also, we are not talking to women who are in active labor. I'll bet that tune changes when they need something and that man is the only one who can get it for them. I'm pretty sure male nurses in OB go above and beyond to respect the modesty of their patient's and their patient's families. They realize their disadvantage. I don't buy that a women nurse is better suited for that position because they understand. Understanding and caring are two different things. I've worked with and seen far too many female L&D nurses who don't care and it shows. I think this guy and others like him deserve a chance.
    futurehomebirthcnm likes this.
  4. Visit  caregiver1977 profile page
    2
    Quote from Suburban.Raider.11
    Religious and cultural issues are one thing, but thinking that a nurse cares about your parts in anyway other than a professional way is ridiculous. Modesty is modesty. No one is eager to show their parts to a female nurse either but you get over it to have your baby. Also, we are not talking to women who are in active labor. I'll bet that tune changes when they need something and that man is the only one who can get it for them. I'm pretty sure male nurses in OB go above and beyond to respect the modesty of their patient's and their patient's families. They realize their disadvantage. I don't buy that a women nurse is better suited for that position because they understand. Understanding and caring are two different things. I've worked with and seen far too many female L&D nurses who don't care and it shows. I think this guy and others like him deserve a chance.
    I know you hate to think it, but not all nurses (or doctors) are that professional. Some of them do make rude comments about body parts or losing control of your body right to the patient (I have witnessed this happen and it has happened to me; I am not talking about something I heard). But you are exactly right when you say there are many female nurses that are not suited/no longer suited for labor and delivery. I think the OP deserves a chance.
  5. Visit  waterbirthingRN profile page
    0
    While it is not my intention to discourage anyone from their dreams and goals, I would not want a male to be my L&D nurse. Much like I would not want a male Dr. to attend the birth of my child. It's a personal preference. I don't understand why a man would want to do that. That is not meant to be rude, I'm actually very curious? Looking at lady parts all day seems like it would be very uncomfortable and intimidating if I was the opposite sex and couldn't relate in any way.
  6. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    3
    Quote from waterbirthingRN
    While it is not my intention to discourage anyone from their dreams and goals, I would not want a male to be my L&D nurse. Much like I would not want a male Dr. to attend the birth of my child. It's a personal preference. I don't understand why a man would want to do that. That is not meant to be rude, I'm actually very curious? Looking at lady parts all day seems like it would be very uncomfortable and intimidating if I was the opposite sex and couldn't relate in any way.
    I'm not uncomfortable looking at a man's penis. Many female nurses aren't bothered by it at all, as I'm sure you know, so I don't know why men would be expected to feel any differently.

    Would I be shocked to have a male L&D nurse? You betcha. Would I have a REAL treason to be uncomfortable other than stereotypes and the uncommonness of it? No. So I'd just keep an open mins, and hopefully he'd blow my mind with his awesomeness and I'd forever talk to friends and family about the great male nurse I had. C
    Elvish, Bortaz, RN, and Patti_RN like this.
  7. Visit  carrie_c profile page
    1
    I am uncomfortable looking at a man's penis. That's one reason I like OB so much. I worked med/surg before OB, and I know it might sound crazy, but I was never comfortable taking care of males.
    waterbirthingRN likes this.
  8. Visit  Fyreflie profile page
    0
    I say go for it. As someone else has already pointed out, just because you're female doesn't mean you have the monopoly on compassionate care; I know plenty of female L&D nurses that I have wanted to punch in the face for making ridiculously rude, insensitive, or uncompassionate comments. Some people are just not cut out for OB, regardless of their gender.

    When you truly love your area of work it shows, and I think that will help you through some difficult situations you are probably going to face.

    Just FYI--Ontario now has its first male midwife he's getting rave reviews!
  9. Visit  RiverRN profile page
    1
    If you think you love it, then absolutely go for it. Patients feel the difference when their nurse is doing what he/she loves; And every woman deserves that kind of care when she is birthing.

    Source: I'm a Male L&D RN
    Esme12 likes this.


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