LDRP or LDR? What are the pros and cons?

  1. Hi, I recently got an intership in the hospital I do my clinical in for school which is an LDRP. Basically the staff is not all that freindly and the staff is small so they work together have been described as their own "dysfuctional family." My question is that I would like to know from those of you who work in L&D, postpardum, or work in an LDRP what are the pros and cons of each? I just went to an open house for a large hospital here that has LDR's and I am questioning whether or not I would want to put time into this floor that I got the internship on as far as possible work in the future. Will I ever fit in with these seasoned nurses who are used to doing things THEIR way? Please help!

    Teresa
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   rdhdnrs
    I work in LDR and LDRP both. I personally like LDR better, just because I don't enjoy postpartum that much. LDRP is very hard to staff, and the unit I work in is always short-staffed. Plus, if you're full of PP moms and babies, where do the new laborers go? In triage?
    As for fitting in, if you are smart and work hard, you will eventually break into the circle-if that's what you want. Find the nicest nurse and glom onto her, ask questions, feel your way, and you will find your own style of nursing. Then you will be more confident.
    Good luck!
    Lisa
  4. by   Caseyrnbsn
    Hi Teresa,

    I work in an LDRP setting. Administration believe you me gets the "most bang for it's buck". In this type of setting we are all cross trained. With high census everyone is DR and the post-partum nurse is everything. It can be very exhausting. We are all assigned an area at the start of the shift but you never know where you may find yourself. Most of the time it is a wonderful arrangement but there are trying times. In an LDR setup you are strictly DR or postpartum. Weigh the differences and staffing ratios carefully aloong with back up plans for high census and the acuity level of the facility you are going to be employed at. I hope this helps.

    Karen
  5. by   Lbrechinrn
    We started out as LDRP's, but that did not last long. We quickly out grew the LDRP's. I personally do not like LDRP's, I like to get my patient delivered and then take care of more laboring patients.

    That is just me.
  6. by   JenniferNRN
    I'm glad that we are LDR only because I am one of those who enjoys L&D but not postpartum. I am cross trained to PP and Nsy, but I will choose L&D most days with a trip to Nsy once in a while. I like having a choice in the matter.

    Just my opinion though....
  7. by   judy ann
    I've done both, and both have positives and negatives. LDR- Positives- staff is L&D only. pt leaves the old, hot, nasty labor bed and goes to a new bed after delivery. Decor in PP rooms is more festive and enjoyable. Negatives- Pt must move from del bed to PP bed when she would rather rest, and someone has to move her "stuff". Family may have trouble finding her. What if the patient next door is in labor and is loud?
    LDRP-Positives-Staff is same and family gets aquainted with them easily. Mom stays in same bed before and after delivery (after cleanup). Her "stuff" stays with her. Rooms are usually decorated in appropriate schemes. Usually larger than LDR. Negatives- Patient stays in a birthing bed for entire stay. Often, the cleaning process after delivery embarrases her.(mopping floor, changing bed) Family asked to wait to see Mom until the room is prepared. What if the patient next door is severe pre-eclamptic, and you are in hard labor, and are asked not to make noise, as she is getting worse.(She will be transfered ASAP)
    Which is best? They both have good and bad sides, and babies can be successfully delivered in either. The choice is with #1 the patient. #2 the facility. #3 the staff. Have fun!!
  8. by   joyrochelle
    I think that everywhere is different....the hospital that i decided to work at after graduation is LDRP, and it's SO gorgeous it's insane. The staff has employees that come and completely clean the beautiful rooms after the delivery while I get mom up into the BR and it looks like they just got there, except the addition of a new member of the family! also, most staff members have their favorite , so some are primarily pp and some are primarily L/d.

    o f course there are times when you have to do pp, but makes you appreciate l/d more when you get back there, and sometimes it can be more fun to teach and discuss with the new moms.

    that's how i see it....anyway...when i worked at the other hospital during school i rotated btw NICU, pp and L/D...the pp rooms were rarely privates and the l/d nurses were so spastic about getting their recovering pt's off the unit and into pp rooms...i hated that....
  9. by   finallyRN
    I work in an LDRP, i originally started in PP then trained to L/D. The majority of the staff are crossed trained. Most of those that are only PP are only awaiting to be cross trained to L/D. There are a few L/D nurses that absolutly hate doing PP but most welcome the break from L/D. Depending on how buzy we are, sometimes the L/D nurse needs to keep their delivered couplets, so having ldrp makes this possible. Most of our patients like the fact that they don't have to move after having there babies.
  10. by   HazeK
    I work in a 450 del/month LDR system...
    we have to 'turn over' the rooms quickly to get ready for the next patient, so LDRPs wouldn't work due to physical space limitations. Also, our LDR staff are direct patient care adrenaline junkies! The "P" end of it doesn't appeal to most of us.

    The patients would all love LDRPs! Not moving and keeping one's private room would have to be ideal from their perspective. Plus, they already 'know their nurse'.

    In our big community, hospitals provide LDRPs when they have to attract patients to their "cuteness". Our hospital is always packed, due to the high standard of care in L&D and our level 3 NICU.

    **would LOVE to see all private rooms for postpartum, though! Then we could attract the "Yuppie Crowd" more! (You know them, the ones who pick their hospital by the themed birthing rooms!)
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    TO me, there is NOTHING LIKE LDRP...the patients prefer it....I prefer it. I hate changing rooms w/the patients...and the issue w/a messy bed? Well, when the patients get up, it is not hard to wipe the bed down and change linens...got change them to anyhow. The floor is mopped in less than 5 min, if there is a need.

    There is a cost saving factor, I would think...saves on housekeeping between pts and rooms. You do a major cleanup only after d/c. Makes good sense to me....

    and the biggest plus is ALL THE LDRP's are big and private rooms. They feel "at home" in them. They make them their "home away from home" while with us. I don't have to deal with lost possessions in moving rooms...I hated that where I used to work. I refused to take responsiblity of course, letting the family MOVE THE STUFF THEMSELVES..... but still had people who misplaced things like cell phones, watches etc...it got OLD!!!!!

    Having come from a place where I personally had to give up a huge labor room for a less private and smaller PP room, the advantages of LDRP over LDR and PP is obvious to me from that patient satisfaction perspective. The more continuity, the better as far as I am concerned.
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    TO me, there is NOTHING LIKE LDRP...the patients prefer it....I prefer it. I hate changing rooms w/the patients...and the issue w/a messy bed? Well, when the patients get up, it is not hard to wipe the bed down and change linens...got change them to anyhow. The floor is mopped in less than 5 min, if there is a need.

    There is a cost saving factor, I would think...saves on housekeeping between pts and rooms. You do a major cleanup only after d/c. Makes good sense to me....

    and the biggest plus is ALL THE LDRP's are big and private rooms. They feel "at home" in them. They make them their "home away from home" while with us. I don't have to deal with lost possessions in moving rooms...I hated that where I used to work. I refused to take responsiblity of course, letting the family MOVE THE STUFF THEMSELVES..... but still had people who misplaced things like cell phones, watches etc...it got OLD!!!!!

    Having come from a place where I personally had to give up a huge labor room for a less private and smaller PP room, the advantages of LDRP over LDR and PP is obvious to me from that patient satisfaction perspective. The more continuity, the better as far as I am concerned.
  13. by   formernurse
    Things have REALLY changed since I worked in LD, and PP back in 1966 (straight out of nursing school). Then you went from a dingy LR into a DR; 90% of patients had general anesthesia, and then you were transferred to PP. At least when I delivered my first daughter, they had started allowing the husband in LD and gave epidurals. That was called progress.

    When my daughter delivered her baby in 2000, she had LDRP--beautiful large room, brightly decorated. She was in labor for a long time and developed pre-eclampsia. They did allow her husband and I both to stay with her throughout the 14 hours she was in labor. We both assisted her when it was time to push. Seeing my granddaughter born was more exciting than having my own children. If I were able to return to OB, I would prefer to do Mother/Baby after delivery. Moms are in for such a short time, but there is alot of teaching that can be done---especially for first-time Moms. As I said in the beginning, times have changed definitely for the better
    Last edit by formernurse on Jun 15, '02
  14. by   ppeaches232002
    Hi everyone,
    My name is Dawn i am starting school in september.I really want to do two things NICU and Labor and delivery i just want to know how everyone like it and your suggestion on it.
    Thanks!!!
    Dawn(ppeaches232002)

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