L & D nurses routinely deliver babies? - page 2

I was wondering if there are any hospitals in which the L & D nurses routinely deliver women? I am a midwife in London and hoping to move to Florida soon. My mum lives in Fort Lauderdale. She... Read More

  1. by   mother/babyRN
    Not on purpose, but you do , on occasion, have to catch...I have 10 and counting and believe me, it wasn't planned that way. Only one boy in the bunch!
  2. by   midwife sarah
    I passed my NCLEX after 75 questions........so happy!
  3. by   dragonladymlb
    :hatparty:
    Quote from midwife sarah
    I passed my NCLEX after 75 questions........so happy!
    Congradulations
  4. by   lgowan
    I passed my NCLEX after 75 questions........so happy!

    :hatparty:

    Lisa
  5. by   jaimealmostRN
    Quote from midwife sarah
    I passed my NCLEX after 75 questions........so happy!
    Congrats!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :hatparty: You should be VERY proud of yourself, go out and celebrate!


    Quicky question: I had maternity last semester and then we were required t take the NLN test and remeidate if necessary on that topic. I did fine but one question is sticking with me and I've lent my maternity book to another student. If you are the nurse and the baby is crowning with no doctor/midwife in the room, besides calling for assistance, what exactly does the nurse do? I only remember the one answer which was, apply gentle pressure to the head and I think another option was to pull the baby out. Any thoughts? L&D nurses?
  6. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from midwife sarah
    Thing that puts me off this is that it seems that it is the L & D nurses who are with the women through their labours and not the CNMs. Defies the whole essence of what a midwife is.
    I had a CNM and she was with me for my entire 25.5 hours laboring in hospital (save a 2hr break from 2-4am). My sister was with me during that time and at that point I was in a pretty good groove with relaxing/breathing through my contractions. She was also only a few steps away if I needed her.

    Also, ended up with a C/S and my CNM took the pix.
  7. by   TammyWilson808
    Quote from midwife sarah
    Thanks for the replies. Maybe she was talking about CNMs?? I am coming to USA with an agency and am contracted to them for at least 18 months as a L & D nurse. Worried that I am going to find it really difficult to adjust to the practice in the US. Used to being fairly autonomous as a midwife in UK. Anyhow I want to come live in US so will have to get through it. May train to become CNM eventually..... Thing that puts me off this is that it seems that it is the L & D nurses who are with the women through their labours and not the CNMs. Defies the whole essence of what a midwife is. Anyway going to Atlanta tomorrow to sit NCLEX. If I cant pass it all of this is irrelevant as I cant come!
    Aloha Midwife Sarah,

    It is true on a very rare occasion RNs deliver babes when MDs cannot get there in time. It is unforseen and can't be helped but it is routine for the MDs and Certified Nurse Midwives we have to deliver our babes. Please get in touch with me and I could hook you up with the midwives here as one of them just came from Florida where she was practicing!

    I have had the pleasure of working with RNs who've been midwives before and the transition from midwife to RN is extremely difficult. As a midwife, they are in charge and make the decisions for labor and delivery of their patients. As RNs they take orders and are not autonomous with decision-making. (You must have lots of birthing experience and you will be such an asset to whoever is lucky enough to have you!) I have not seen one midwife make the transition successfully. The only one that was successful was my girlfriend who was a midwife then became an OB MD. But I want to stress that it is not impossible--nothing is!

    I also saw in this thread later that you passed your boards! CONGRATULATIONS! Be deligent and you can do it!

    Tammy
    Last edit by TammyWilson808 on May 23, '04
  8. by   midwife sarah
    Thanks for your reply I have sent you a PM. What is an OB MD? I would imagine you mean OB Medical Doctor? Thanks
    Quote from TammyWilson808
    Aloha Midwife Sarah,

    It is true on a very rare occasion RNs deliver babes when MDs cannot get there in time. It is unforseen and can't be helped but it is routine for the MDs and Certified Nurse Midwives we have to deliver our babes. Please get in touch with me and I could hook you up with the midwives here as one of them just came from Florida where she was practicing!

    I have had the pleasure of working with RNs who've been midwives before and the transition from midwife to RN is extremely difficult. As a midwife, they are in charge and make the decisions for labor and delivery of their patients. As RNs they take orders and are not autonomous with decision-making. (You must have lots of birthing experience and you will be such an asset to whoever is lucky enough to have you!) I have not seen one midwife make the transition successfully. The only one that was successful was my girlfriend who was a midwife then became an OB MD. But I want to stress that it is not impossible--nothing is!

    I also saw in this thread later that you passed your boards! CONGRATULATIONS! Be deligent and you can do it!

    Tammy
  9. by   fergus51
    Bizarre. I have worked with tons of British trained midwives working as L&D nurses and they were all great!
  10. by   tavalon
    Quote from midwife sarah
    I was wondering if there are any hospitals in which the L & D nurses routinely deliver women? I am a midwife in London and hoping to move to Florida soon. My mum lives in Fort Lauderdale. She spoke to a L & D nurse who works in Memorial West in Mirimar and she told my mum that the nurses there deliver babies without doctors. Doctors are involved if there are any complications only. I hope this is true as this would be ideal job for me!
    Nope. Not unless they are risking their licenses. However, every L/D nurse ends up delivering a baby from time to time, when the doctor doesn't make it in time.

close