Healthy women schedule C-sections to prevent vaginal stretching - page 3

Has anyone personally encountered this, or known a doctor who would do it? There's been press about this in the past few years, along with a "too posh to push" philosophy, and it seems very... Read More

  1. by   SpiceChick01
    QueenJean, I am LMAO at flappy Hoohas! It's gotta go one day, ain't THAT the truth!!!!!!!

  2. by   Jolie
    Quote from bethin
    There's surgery that you can have to tighten your vagina. Apparently it's all the rage in Hollywood to have what I think they refer to as the "Jolie".
    YIKES! If someone is going to name a "cosmetic" procedure after my screen name, shouldn't I get to choose what it is?
  3. by   crissrn27
    I just gotta believe that the people doing this are either 1. Scared to death of what is supposed to be a natural event, but that we have medicalized so much that it is akin to brain surgery!

    or

    2. NOT told the risk appropriately

    or

    3. Really that vain, and self-centered, that they would put their child at increased risk of resp distress, TTN, etc (not to mention the risk for them)


    If it only involved risk to mom, I would be willing to support it, but it doesn't. The baby is at an increased risk of TTN, other breathing problems, late preterm birth (and all those complications) if an amnio isn't done, and the anesthesia risk. Not to mention that c-section moms/babies are less likely to breastfeed, and future babies can have problems as well (previa, accreta)


    Just not worth it, unless it is medically necessary.
    Last edit by crissrn27 on Oct 16, '07
  4. by   magz53
    To get back to the original question of whether c-sections are done electively to preserve a vagina.......I actually saw an OB write in the chart......"elective ceserean chosen to preserve the integrity of the vagina as seen on the Today show" !!!!!!!!! Apparently there had been a discussion of such on a morning show. Mother's choice and all that aside, I cannot believe that insurance companies are paying the bigger bucks for a c-section as opposed to a vaginal delivery. That puzzles me no end. I have also seen this same doc write in the chart summary the surgery as "repeat" c-section. Pretty hard to be a repeat when she was a primip. ( So tempted to turn him in for that one !! ) For the record, I had 5 kids ( won't bore anyone with the details ) and I have always had a nice sex life and am NOT incontinent.:spin:
  5. by   dcampbell
    I have had TWO fourth degree lacerations. My first birth ended with a terrible tear toward the rectum. A previous poster mentioned "a few days of discomfort". I should have been so lucky. For five solid weeks I could hardly sit down, the pain was unbearable. My second delivery ended with a fourth degree laceration in the other direction to the clitoris. Thank goodness I had an epidural in at the time. The doc had to sew the foley into me and the pain again was more than any woman should have to bear. Having taken care of patients that have had C/S's and traumatic deliveries it is hard to tell which is worst. But looking back I wish I had had C/S's instead due to the long term lingering problems I have had ever since the vaginal births. Just my two cents.
  6. by   jnrsmommy
    I whole-heartedly agree, with all of the other elective surgeries that are available now, why not have a c-section be elective. Granted, I do believe that for the reason to "tighten up the vagina" is definitely vain, but then, so are the other elective cosmetic surgeries that are not medically necessary. I think that the mentality today is "Why be you when you can be better" (stole that from Robots, but it fits).

    Personally, I'm terrified of vaginal births. I had my kids prior to entering nursing school or becoming a nurse. Just the thought of that grossed and freaked me out like nothing else ever could. I had an emergency c-section w/ my first and 14 1/2 months later, had my 2nd section. With both of those, I had the foley and IV removed the first night, up walking around, never took pain meds, and w/ the first one, I was bowling a week later (I know better now than to be doing that, but I felt great).

    Honestly, the idea of a vaginal birth still disturbs me. I have seen numerous different surgeries, helped secure someone's intestines that were coming out of an abdominal wound that dehisced, suctioned the nastiest sputum, cleaned up emesis, bm, you name it, I'm there, no problem. Show me a baby crowning, and I need a chair or wall STAT.

    What gets me is the new moms who are just sooo beside themselves because they're delivery did not go as planned (usually, this is the ones that wanted a vaginal birth but ended up w/ a section). Helllloooooo. Nothing is written in stone when it comes time to being in the hospital. You spent your time pregnant, you had the morning sickness, the weight gain, hot flashes, feet swelling, unbelievable mood swings, and you came into the hospital pregnant, and leaving w/ a baby. So it didn't come out the way that you wanted, look at the bigger picture, you're leaving w/ what you spent the better part of a year making.
  7. by   Jolie
    Quote from jnrsmommy
    I whole-heartedly agree, with all of the other elective surgeries that are available now, why not have a c-section be elective. Granted, I do believe that for the reason to "tighten up the vagina" is definitely vain, but then, so are the other elective cosmetic surgeries that are not medically necessary. I think that the mentality today is "Why be you when you can be better" (stole that from Robots, but it fits).

    Personally, I'm terrified of vaginal births. I had my kids prior to entering nursing school or becoming a nurse. Just the thought of that grossed and freaked me out like nothing else ever could. I had an emergency c-section w/ my first and 14 1/2 months later, had my 2nd section. With both of those, I had the foley and IV removed the first night, up walking around, never took pain meds, and w/ the first one, I was bowling a week later (I know better now than to be doing that, but I felt great).

    Honestly, the idea of a vaginal birth still disturbs me. I have seen numerous different surgeries, helped secure someone's intestines that were coming out of an abdominal wound that dehisced, suctioned the nastiest sputum, cleaned up emesis, bm, you name it, I'm there, no problem. Show me a baby crowning, and I need a chair or wall STAT.

    What gets me is the new moms who are just sooo beside themselves because they're delivery did not go as planned (usually, this is the ones that wanted a vaginal birth but ended up w/ a section). Helllloooooo. Nothing is written in stone when it comes time to being in the hospital. You spent your time pregnant, you had the morning sickness, the weight gain, hot flashes, feet swelling, unbelievable mood swings, and you came into the hospital pregnant, and leaving w/ a baby. So it didn't come out the way that you wanted, look at the bigger picture, you're leaving w/ what you spent the better part of a year making.

    I find your last paragraph curious. You state that you would not choose a vaginal delivery due to personal concerns, yet you seem judgemental of women who are equally disturbed by having a surgical birth. Why is it OK to desire a surgical birth, but not OK to be disappointed over the loss of a planned vaginal delivery?
  8. by   scattycarrot
    Interesting thread. I am 17 weeks pregnant and was told,in 2001, that I would have to deliver by c-section after a car accident fractured my pelvis and hip. I do not want a c-section for all the reasons tht have been discussed here and luckily, I have a very supportive obgyn who respects my wishes for a vaginal delivery and we are going to work towards that goal with the help of PT(yipee!). I cannot fathom why some-one would want major surgery as opposed to a vaginal delivery( and I am talking about women who have no medical need for a c-section). Now, I respect the womans choice to do what she wants with her body but I often think that to the average woman with no knowledge of healthcare, that c-sections do seem an easy option. Surgery has become so common that people forget that there are serious risk factors involved with any surgery and particualry, major abdominal surgery. For me, knowing what I know, I want to avoid surgery at all costs. I have seen to many patients with infected and dehissed wounds, adhesions, perforations, PE's, etc... for me to want surgery. Now, if I have to have one anyway, than so be it but if I had a choice, such as these ladies have who only want a c-section to maintain the integrity of their vagina, than it would be a vaginal delivery all the way.
  9. by   RainDreamer
    That is a bit disturbing and to electively chose a c-section (for no medical reason other than you just rather have a c-section) is very selfish, IMO. The most disturbing thing is that these women are ok with compromising their baby's health.
  10. by   ERGirl83
    Quote from rph3664
    Has anyone personally encountered this, or known a doctor who would do it?


    Every woman I have ever known who has experienced both has said that a vaginal birth is MUCH less painful, even a very traumatic delivery vs. a c-section with no labor at all.

    Keep in mind that this is not a criticism of necessary c-sections.
    I'm going to have to disagree with "every woman you have every known who has experienced both." My c-section and recovery, INCLUDING complications (staph infection and seroma) were a thousand times better than my labor and attempts at pushing. I would choose a repeat section any day, and in fact, I probably wouldn't even have any more kids if I couldn't have a section.

    Personally, I believe that a woman has the right to make INFORMED choices about her body and her medical care, and that includes the right to request a c-section over a vaginal delivery. I certainly don't think it's a great choice to have a c-section to avoid "vaginal stretching," but I respect the fact that not every woman views a vaginal delivery as some special rite of passage. I firmly believe that a woman and her doctor should sit down together, go over the pros and cons of each, and then make an informed decision. If only my doctors would have listened to me throughout my pregnancy when I told them I had a feeling I would need a c-section, and when I begged them to schedule one, perhaps we could have avoided 30 hours of labor, and the two of us almost dying.

    I also don't see why we're so up in arms about having a c-section to avoid a seemingly cosmetic (or accessory) problem, but we don't have problems with 16 year olds getting breast augmentations and liposuction.
  11. by   RainDreamer
    Quote from DollBabyKG
    I also don't see why we're so up in arms about having a c-section to avoid a seemingly cosmetic (or accessory) problem, but we don't have problems with 16 year olds getting breast augmentations and liposuction.
    Because it's her choice for her OWN body. Whereas a woman that choses a c-section is compromising the baby's start of life.

    Sure, there are plenty of times when a c-section is warranted and even necessary for both mom and baby. But that's not what we're talking about here, we're talking about ELECTIVE c-sections. C-section babies that come over to us GFRing because of the c-section isn't quite the best start for that kiddo, you know?

    If the mom wants to do things to her own body that's fine, but in these cases you have another life to think about.
  12. by   ERGirl83
    Quote from Jolie
    I find your last paragraph curious. You state that you would not choose a vaginal delivery due to personal concerns, yet you seem judgemental of women who are equally disturbed by having a surgical birth. Why is it OK to desire a surgical birth, but not OK to be disappointed over the loss of a planned vaginal delivery?
    I think I understand what she's getting at, and I don't think it's about belittling those who do view a vaginal birth as something special and important, it's about getting those women to realize that sometimes, it really isn't possible, and that while it's certainly okay to be disappointed that you didn't get the birth experience you wanted, the bigger picture, that you and your child are both healthy and ALIVE, is certainly more important.

    Heck, I didn't get the birth I wanted. And had I been given the c-section when I requested it, my son and I wouldn't have gone through hell to get here, but instead of spending all of my time lamenting how they should have listened, I sat back, realized we both came through alive and healthy, and that was all that matters.

    I think too many women believe their birth plans are set in stone, and aren't willing to compromise even when their life or their babies life is in danger. This is something that should be discussed between the mother and her doctor PRIOR to delivery, so that she can prepare herself ahead of time, and not be left to grieve something that couldn't be.
  13. by   ERGirl83
    Quote from RainDreamer
    Because it's her choice for her OWN body. Whereas a woman that choses a c-section is compromising the baby's start of life.

    Sure, there are plenty of times when a c-section is warranted and even necessary for both mom and baby. But that's not what we're talking about here, we're talking about ELECTIVE c-sections. C-section babies that come over to us GFRing because of the c-section isn't quite the best start for that kiddo, you know?

    If the mom wants to do things to her own body that's fine, but in these cases you have another life to think about.
    Yet, we perform abortions, allow mothers to smoke/drink during pregnancy without reprocussions, take drugs at delivery and induction that haven't been proven safe on the babies...Given the MYRIAD of issues during pregnancy and childbirth, I hardly find an elective c-section to be the most disturbing...

    I mean, by your line of thinking, we should also ban all epidurals, because they have been shown to make labor take longer, and cause other issues in mom and baby, along with pain medications that may/may not cross the placenta. We'll have to be sure to ban all formula unless it's medically necessary, because breast is best, regardless of whether the mother is comfortable with breastfeeding.

    There is a fine line to walk in respecting the righs of the mother to make decisions regarding her health, and the health of her child, and in protecting the child.

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