Doula training to get a job in L&D??

  1. Hi everyone! I am currently in a BSN program at Arizona State University, I graduate in December. Before school I was really interested in the NICU and didnt think I would like L&D at all. I applied to NICU externships/immersion programs before I did my L&D rotation, so I can no longer get an externship in L&D at this point. After the rotation I realized I loved L&D, I really like working with mothers and someday would love to consider becoming a CNM after working in L&D. I currently live in Phoenix and am considering moving to San Diego. I have heard its extremely hard (especially in these two cities) to find a labor and delivery job right off the bat. I am really not interested in working in another area other than NICU. I was wondering if there is anything I can do to add to my resume, specifically doula training? It's a little pricey ($300 for a three day training). There is also just an intro to child birth workshop for $100 for 1 day. I am just curious would this help me stand out as a candidate? Or do the L&D nurses and doulas not have very many overlapping concepts? Please let me know, or if anyone has any other ideas to help me secure a spot in L&D after graduation I would greatly appreciate it!
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   prnqday
    It would certainly get you a foot in the door
  4. by   klone
    I would recommend lactation training over doula training. It is a more marketable skill to have in OB.
  5. by   Graceisland
    I believe one of the reasons I was hired as a new grad into L&D was that I was a childbirth educator, and a doula, belonged to AWHONN, etc. So the director knew I was really passionate about L&D and wasn't just looking for any nursing job I could get. Doula skills can really be a big help in L&D, especially when you have a pt. come in that wants an unmedicated birth. Lactation training is great too!
  6. by   Salsacat
    Quote from kierstennn
    Hi everyone! I am currently in a BSN program at Arizona State University, I graduate in December. Before school I was really interested in the NICU and didnt think I would like L&D at all. I applied to NICU externships/immersion programs before I did my L&D rotation, so I can no longer get an externship in L&D at this point. After the rotation I realized I loved L&D, I really like working with mothers and someday would love to consider becoming a CNM after working in L&D. I currently live in Phoenix and am considering moving to San Diego. I have heard its extremely hard (especially in these two cities) to find a labor and delivery job right off the bat. I am really not interested in working in another area other than NICU. I was wondering if there is anything I can do to add to my resume, specifically doula training? It's a little pricey ($300 for a three day training). There is also just an intro to child birth workshop for $100 for 1 day. I am just curious would this help me stand out as a candidate? Or do the L&D nurses and doulas not have very many overlapping concepts? Please let me know, or if anyone has any other ideas to help me secure a spot in L&D after graduation I would greatly appreciate it!

    The ONLY way to get hired directly into a new grad position in L&D in San Diego is to take the six week Regional Perinatal System Maternal Newborn Care course, which is affiliated with UCSD extension. Local hospitals say it's "preferred" but you don't get hired without it. I graduated from a local nursing school and then took the course while studying for and taking my NCLEX. The ONLY exception may be Paradise Valley Hospital (a smaller community hospital) in National City (southern San Diego county). Also, the job market for RNs in San Diego is saturated, and L&D new grad positions are few and far between. If you want to do L&D in San Diego, your best bet is to get experience first and then make the move. NICU is also extremely difficult to get into. The NICU censuses are down right now and one of the main area hospitals stopped hiring NICU new grads at all until at the very earliest 2018. So, if you stay where you are and leverage your contacts to work in the field you love there, you will be in a MUCH better position to move later!
    PS-- here is the link for the course: RPS Continuing Education Courses It's only given twice a year. If you already have experience, you don't need it -- but if you are a new grad, it's essential.

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