CNA's in OB

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    Hi all! I am a pre-nursing student and am about to take a cna class this december and I was looking at job openings for cna's in my area and I noticed there was an opening for a cna in the OB/GYN department at one of the local hospitals. I was wondering if anyone could tell me what a cna's duties would consist of on the OB/GYN floor? Thank you!
  2. 7 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    We do not use CNAs just scrub techs. The RNs do CNA duties--the scrubs do just scrub in for csections and desk/paperwork. I have found this to be true in all the places I have worked. Only the really BIG hospitals tend to use CNAs in OB.

    A CNA would tend to be responsible for patient cares, such as, assisting to toilet,shower, ambulation, changing bed linens/gowns, passing meal trays, charting intake/output, taking vital signs on moms, and reporting condition changes to the RNs responsible for their overall care. They also tend to assemble chart packs/do paperwork/enter computer orders for doctors, etc and run specimens to lab. Especially if there is no unit secretary, the CNA may be splitting those duties w/the nurses on the unit, as well. (as above, entering computer orders and doing paperwork as well as answering phones). CNA involvement with newborn care is usually very limited to diaper changes and possibly taking vital signs.

    Hope this helps???
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Nov 20, '06
  4. 0
    Hey!
    I currently work as a nurse tech on an OB floor (though I graduate December 8th & am currently interviewing for L&D RN positions ^__^). My duties in L&D are a little above and beyond those of a tech's up on a regular floor and I typically have fewer patients (~7). Anyways, I'm responsible for maintaining and stocking LDR rooms. I always make sure suction canisters, face masks, and baby masks are hooked up and ready to go & suture is in the room (you never know what you're going to get). I perform straight caths and foleys PRN. I also provide the initial care for the well term newborn. Thus, I clean and weigh little one, and perform initial vital signs. I also provide bulb suction and blow-by O2 as needed. Although the nurses assign APGARS and I technically don't assess, I always observe baby's tone, color, heart rate, and auscultate breath sounds. This is because I'm solely responsible for baby and the nurse has both baby and mom (who can be a little more complicated in a normal delivery - and there's paperwork). I always report any alterations to the nurse and perform the necessary interventions that I'm allowed to perform - drying and stimulatiing the baby, bulb suction, and blow-by O2. Other than this, my tech role includes providing nutrition for our clients and transporting to postpartum. Oh! And I've occasionally assisted in repairs, and I always set up the sterile delivery tray and baby bed. It's a lot of fun, but I can only tell you about L&D as postpartum and GYN are separate units. It's great experience, but you need some clinical time, knowledge of baby, and experience with caths under your belt before you do it. Good Luck!
  5. 0
    Quote from mistiffy
    Hi all! I am a pre-nursing student and am about to take a cna class this december and I was looking at job openings for cna's in my area and I noticed there was an opening for a cna in the OB/GYN department at one of the local hospitals. I was wondering if anyone could tell me what a cna's duties would consist of on the OB/GYN floor? Thank you!

    We have a few NAII's that work on our floor, they function as unit secretaries, and assist with the baby at delivery. (diapering, weighing, and putting bands on). Our manager is not hiring them anymore just scrub techs since they can scrub in for c/s. Basically we the RN's do all patient care, which is fine by me!
    Last edit by LDRNMOMMY on Nov 22, '06
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    If your unit has antepartum patients as well, there is more to do. Bedbaths on the complete bedrest ones, linen changes, vital signs, meals, assist pt's to ambulate to the bathroom, refill water pitchers, etc.

    we don't have na's, but if we are super busy and short on nurses, we might pull another na from another unit, so the RN's on the antepartum side are freed up a little
  7. 0
    We usually hire CNA's and train them to become scrub techs. When not doing C/S's they function on the floor as a CNA, stocking, pericare, foleys, vitals, ambulating post op patients.

    They used to set up and attend vaginal deliveries, but cost cuts ended that. Now the RN's do everyting.
    We do use a CNA in our well baby nursery at night. For the moms who don't want to take care of their infants and want to sleep. We have had nursing students in that position until they graduate, then they have their foot in the door for getting a job on our unit.

  8. 0
    The CAs in our L&D do no patient care. The only patient interaction thay have is if they're needed to transport a pt to ante or post partum.

    Ante CAs do vitals, finger sticks, oral I&O, assist with showering if need be, changing linens, refill pitchers, and help set up rooms for admits.
  9. 0
    I've been a CNA on Mother Baby (Post Partum, L&D, and Nursery) for 5 years. I started out on Post Partum which duties are vitals, bed baths for post c/s pts, changing bed sheets, getting them up to the bathroom for the first time and teaching them to use their 'topicals', getting the shower ready, emptying foleys, and pericare. Nursery we give baby baths, do feedings, diapers, vitals, stock. In L&D we are the techs for the floor and we also have to scrub for c/s...so if you want to work L&D you have to know how to scrub. If you are not in a c/s we assist the RN's with whatever they need, open delivery tables, check the baby warmers and O2 tanks...we really dont have alot of patient care in L&D like you do in PP but the surgical experience is great!

    Oh yeah...I forgot...we always stock, stock, stock!!!!

    I start my nursing program in January but I definatley think that being a CNA is so beneficial. I really can see a difference in the nurses that I work with and I know right away who was a CNA before they became a nurse.


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