Clinical supervision - enquiry of what happens in the USA

  1. I am currently undertaking a study exploring clinical supervision activity in an area of the UK. I am interested to know what fields of nursing in the USA have clinical supervision ( or if any do) and what process is followed, is it endorsed? or is it voluntary particpation?

    clinical supervision in the UK, general refers to a term used to describe a formal process of professional support and learning which enables individual practitioners to develop knowledge and competence, assume responsibility for their own practice and enhance patient protection and the safety of care in complex situations. According to the Department of Health it ‘is central to the process of learning and to the expansion of the scope of practice and should be seen as means of encouraging self-assessment as well as analytical and reflective skills’ (DOH, 1993). This is normally carried out with peers, or one-to-one with another colleague of your choice and is voluntary in nursing, where as in midwfery in the UK it is statutory.

    I would be really grateful of any information.

    thank you

    [ May 19, 2001: Message edited by: alikecher ]

    [ May 19, 2001: Message edited by: alikecher ]
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  2. 1 Comments

  3. by   jamistlc
    Originally posted by alikecher:
    <STRONG>I am currently undertaking a study exploring clinical supervision activity in an area of the UK. I am interested to know what fields of nursing in the USA have clinical supervision ( or if any do) and what process is followed, is it endorsed? or is it voluntary particpation?

    I would be really grateful of any information.

    thank you</STRONG>
    Greetings All Nurses,

    I am not sure by your term of clinical supervision? If I understand it, this is what we have here in the USA. In the Hospital we have a DON and probably a ADON (Director of Nursing and a Assistant Director of Nursing, respectively), this level of administration has a House Officer known as the head nurse during all shifts. This head nurse is at the top of the clinical suporvisor area! The next level is the Unit Managers often reffered to as Nurse Managers. I will explain in the USA, our hospitals are very specialized so the is a unit for all medical/surgical specialties! These may have specific diagnosis assigned to a particular floor based upon the DX. These may have over lapping specialties on one floor. Most would fall under the heading of Med/Surg but then are divided into areas like Neuro/Surg....so here the term "unit" usually refers to ICU, SICU, MICU.....except were it used with the term "manager" then it could be any clinical area or floor. The clinical supervision ladder remains the same, but many of our rural hospitals just have on floor, so all, but ER (Emergency Room) and Maternal Services clients are found there. During the absence of the Unit manager (and even when they are there) there is a "Charge Nurse' who supervises all nursing personnel on the floor. The chain of command is further broken down to RN (Registered Nurses) who is responsible for their clients and the LPN (Licensed practical Nurses clients IV'S) The LPN has their clients and then both of them supervise the CNA (Certified Nursing Aid or Assistant) AKA as a PCA (Patient Care Assistant). The floor/unit has a unit secetary who takes off the physicians orders and then a nurse double checks them and the MAR (Medication Adminitration Record). Then there is the anncilarry departments like lab, which has phlebotomists; housekeeping which usually has a person assigned to each floor (during the day) and the list goes on and on. I hope this answered your question with enough detail

    One more point under the LPN we have a certification that allows us in many states to practice limited IV therapy, no push meds (except flushes) and no piggy backs or admixtures just fluids for hydration. We also can not do TPN.

    Peace,
    have a Blessed Day,
    Jami

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