baby friendly questions - page 5

by Rhee

19,975 Views | 109 Comments

The hospital that I work at is in the process of becoming baby friendly, and I have some questions about how the baby friendly initiative is implemented in other hospitals. I want to start by saying that I think that... Read More


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    Its not like a nursery doesn't exist in our facility. We have a special care nursery. Its not a nursery where babes get sent out and get all lined up in a row in front of a big window for visitors to "ooh" and "ahh" over. Honestly, that is the romanticized image that many patients and visitors still have these days with regard to nurseries. What our nursery is used for is for infant procedures (circ's, hearing screens, car seat challenge, daily weights, shots etc), feeders and growers, withdrawing babes, bili light treatments and so on, so forth. Other than that, they stay in the room. If a mom insists on sending them out, sure they can go in to the nursery or hang out at the nurses station, but as soon as they wake, they're brought back into the room so mom can feed them/change them/tend to them. As far as infant assessments and first baths...thats all done in the room.
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    Quote from melmarie23
    Its not like a nursery doesn't exist in our facility. We have a special care nursery. Its not a nursery where babes get sent out and get all lined up in a row in front of a big window for visitors to "ooh" and "ahh" over. Honestly, that is the romanticized image that many patients and visitors still have these days with regard to nurseries. What our nursery is used for is for infant procedures (circ's, hearing screens, car seat challenge, daily weights, shots etc), feeders and growers, withdrawing babes, bili light treatments and so on, so forth. Other than that, they stay in the room. If a mom insists on sending them out, sure they can go in to the nursery or hang out at the nurses station, but as soon as they wake, they're brought back into the room so mom can feed them/change them/tend to them. As far as infant assessments and first baths...thats all done in the room.
    so then what do you do in the case of sick moms? I was on magnesium sulfate and had a rough c-section - I was hallucinating when I came out of surgery and recovery more than 5 hours later - I don't remember the first 24 hours of the kids lives, and I certainly would NOT have been able to get out of bed to do anything (plus I had a Foley until I was off the mag) - would you then take the babies to the nursery? (sorry I tend to thing of babies as coming in more than one LOL!)
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    Interesting. We are looking at ....going the directino of baby friendly, but we do participate in rooming in, skin to skin, etc. We actually have a lot in place that BFHI supports. We do our bili treatments in the rooms and feeder growers, their mom's do what we call boarding. This is where, if we have the room, they get their own room that they keep the baby in.
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    Quote from Twinmom06
    so then what do you do in the case of sick moms? I was on magnesium sulfate and had a rough c-section - I was hallucinating when I came out of surgery and recovery more than 5 hours later - I don't remember the first 24 hours of the kids lives, and I certainly would NOT have been able to get out of bed to do anything (plus I had a Foley until I was off the mag) - would you then take the babies to the nursery? (sorry I tend to thing of babies as coming in more than one LOL!)
    Well obviously if mom is sick as you were then the baby goes to the nursery! We're not reckless-come on!

    An otherwise, uncomplicated birth with a stable mom and babe-they are couplet care and room in.
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    Quote from melmarie23
    Well obviously if mom is sick as you were then the baby goes to the nursery! We're not reckless-come on!

    An otherwise, uncomplicated birth with a stable mom and babe-they are couplet care and room in.
    sorry - I was just wondering if you required the father of the baby or other family member to stay and care for the baby(ies) - I didn't mean to sound stupid to you...
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    Quote from Twinmom06
    so then what do you do in the case of sick moms? I was on magnesium sulfate and had a rough c-section - I was hallucinating when I came out of surgery and recovery more than 5 hours later - I don't remember the first 24 hours of the kids lives, and I certainly would NOT have been able to get out of bed to do anything (plus I had a Foley until I was off the mag) - would you then take the babies to the nursery? (sorry I tend to thing of babies as coming in more than one LOL!)
    At my facility, if the mom is sick, one of the admit nurses (they do the newborn admissions/transitions) is assigned to the infant. So the baby hangs out at the nurses' station or nursery with the baby, or if she has an admission to do, another nurse will babysit. But our nursery sounds a lot like Melmarie's. We encourage rooming in, and I can count on one hand the number of times *I* have suggested a baby go to the nursery. But if parents ask, we don't deny them, but we make it clear that if they're breastfeeding and baby is fussy, the baby will go back to the mom. Or in the case of all babies, they must go back at 6:30.
    melmarie23 likes this.
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    Some hospitals do "baby-friendly" better than others. I work with 2 now that are awesome. They encurage NCB, don't do elective c-sections unless it's a repeat, VBAC often, and support the mothers feeding/circ/vax decisions. The baby rooms in unless the mother asks for it to be taken for awhile.

    The hospital where I had my daughter wasn't so good. After 32 hours of labor and dealing with almost 10 hours of Pit without pain meds I was moved to c-section for failure to progress past 7cm. Baby was fine...I wasn't. I was exhausted, in pain, and very emotional. My ex was with me at the time and helped me with the baby over night. He had to work the next morning and he asked the nurses to take the baby for a few hours so I could sleep. We were bottle feeding due to meds that I was on so it shouldn't have been a big deal. I was in tears I was so tired. He waited for them to come and take her and he got me settled in to sleep. He left and 10 minutes later they bring the baby back. They left me in tears holding her. He called me around the time they were supposed to bring her back and was shocked to find out that they brought her back after he'd had time to leave.
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    Highly mom-unfriendly. And just a darn shame. I'm sorry you had such a negative experience. How great that you work at hospitals that handle things better.
    Esme12 likes this.
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    My amazing, wonderful night nurse who OFFERED to take my son to the nursery and feed him a bottle as needed was my angel from heaven!! The LC who were very helpful, but not pushy were great. I would have been a very angry, hormonal, psycho PP woman if someone had taken my choices away r/t my son and me. About the time a nurse or LC started preaching their agenda on me I would have promptly, if not rudely asked them to leave my room. It's great to educate and leave reading materials, but it should be the choice of the mother if she bottle or breast feeds, or if she rooms in or sends baby out to get some much needed rest.
    rn/writer likes this.
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    i feel that breast feeding should be given a chance before a mother just up and decides to formula feed unless there is a legitament medical reason for having to formula feed. i also feel that rooming in should be given a chance before the mother decides to pawn her baby off to the nurses. not all hospitals have a nurse readily available to do nothing but sit in the nursery and take care of the babies all day long. the hospital in my town have labor and delivery nurses working every aspect of L&D, not just set positions. but i agree with the OP that it should be pushed upon mothers the way her hospital is trying to do. mothers should be educated on the subjects at hand and then make a decision based on the information they have. and for a nurse to flat out tell a mother no about taking the baby for a bit is just wrong. we as nurses are there to help and care for mothers and babies.


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