baby friendly questions - page 4

The hospital that I work at is in the process of becoming baby friendly, and I have some questions about how the baby friendly initiative is implemented in other hospitals. I want to start by... Read More

  1. Visit  ischialspines} profile page
    1
    Yes, that is what I am saying. We certainly have not eliminated our nursery in the process and I don't think we are pressuring anyone into anything they don't want. We do gently give families the support and encouragement they need to continue bf. And having another family member is ideal. I care for a primarily Hispanic population, so most often another support person is there and NOT the FOB. Having cared for many women outside the hospital s narc pain relief (and lots of primips after long labors) I have never seen anyone so exhausted after birth that I was concerned about baby squishing. And if I was, I would certainly intervene! Really, I think the hospital is not the place for recovery and the state of postpartum care (first six weeks total, not hosp stay) in this country is abyssmal. Nut that is a whole 'nother post!
    melmarie23 likes this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  melmarie23} profile page
    0
    Its not like a nursery doesn't exist in our facility. We have a special care nursery. Its not a nursery where babes get sent out and get all lined up in a row in front of a big window for visitors to "ooh" and "ahh" over. Honestly, that is the romanticized image that many patients and visitors still have these days with regard to nurseries. What our nursery is used for is for infant procedures (circ's, hearing screens, car seat challenge, daily weights, shots etc), feeders and growers, withdrawing babes, bili light treatments and so on, so forth. Other than that, they stay in the room. If a mom insists on sending them out, sure they can go in to the nursery or hang out at the nurses station, but as soon as they wake, they're brought back into the room so mom can feed them/change them/tend to them. As far as infant assessments and first baths...thats all done in the room.
  4. Visit  Twinmom06} profile page
    0
    Quote from melmarie23
    Its not like a nursery doesn't exist in our facility. We have a special care nursery. Its not a nursery where babes get sent out and get all lined up in a row in front of a big window for visitors to "ooh" and "ahh" over. Honestly, that is the romanticized image that many patients and visitors still have these days with regard to nurseries. What our nursery is used for is for infant procedures (circ's, hearing screens, car seat challenge, daily weights, shots etc), feeders and growers, withdrawing babes, bili light treatments and so on, so forth. Other than that, they stay in the room. If a mom insists on sending them out, sure they can go in to the nursery or hang out at the nurses station, but as soon as they wake, they're brought back into the room so mom can feed them/change them/tend to them. As far as infant assessments and first baths...thats all done in the room.
    so then what do you do in the case of sick moms? I was on magnesium sulfate and had a rough c-section - I was hallucinating when I came out of surgery and recovery more than 5 hours later - I don't remember the first 24 hours of the kids lives, and I certainly would NOT have been able to get out of bed to do anything (plus I had a Foley until I was off the mag) - would you then take the babies to the nursery? (sorry I tend to thing of babies as coming in more than one LOL!)
  5. Visit  MKS8806} profile page
    0
    Interesting. We are looking at ....going the directino of baby friendly, but we do participate in rooming in, skin to skin, etc. We actually have a lot in place that BFHI supports. We do our bili treatments in the rooms and feeder growers, their mom's do what we call boarding. This is where, if we have the room, they get their own room that they keep the baby in.
  6. Visit  melmarie23} profile page
    0
    Quote from Twinmom06
    so then what do you do in the case of sick moms? I was on magnesium sulfate and had a rough c-section - I was hallucinating when I came out of surgery and recovery more than 5 hours later - I don't remember the first 24 hours of the kids lives, and I certainly would NOT have been able to get out of bed to do anything (plus I had a Foley until I was off the mag) - would you then take the babies to the nursery? (sorry I tend to thing of babies as coming in more than one LOL!)
    Well obviously if mom is sick as you were then the baby goes to the nursery! We're not reckless-come on!

    An otherwise, uncomplicated birth with a stable mom and babe-they are couplet care and room in.
  7. Visit  Twinmom06} profile page
    0
    Quote from melmarie23
    Well obviously if mom is sick as you were then the baby goes to the nursery! We're not reckless-come on!

    An otherwise, uncomplicated birth with a stable mom and babe-they are couplet care and room in.
    sorry - I was just wondering if you required the father of the baby or other family member to stay and care for the baby(ies) - I didn't mean to sound stupid to you...
  8. Visit  klone} profile page
    1
    Quote from Twinmom06
    so then what do you do in the case of sick moms? I was on magnesium sulfate and had a rough c-section - I was hallucinating when I came out of surgery and recovery more than 5 hours later - I don't remember the first 24 hours of the kids lives, and I certainly would NOT have been able to get out of bed to do anything (plus I had a Foley until I was off the mag) - would you then take the babies to the nursery? (sorry I tend to thing of babies as coming in more than one LOL!)
    At my facility, if the mom is sick, one of the admit nurses (they do the newborn admissions/transitions) is assigned to the infant. So the baby hangs out at the nurses' station or nursery with the baby, or if she has an admission to do, another nurse will babysit. But our nursery sounds a lot like Melmarie's. We encourage rooming in, and I can count on one hand the number of times *I* have suggested a baby go to the nursery. But if parents ask, we don't deny them, but we make it clear that if they're breastfeeding and baby is fussy, the baby will go back to the mom. Or in the case of all babies, they must go back at 6:30.
    melmarie23 likes this.
  9. Visit  leodoula} profile page
    3
    Some hospitals do "baby-friendly" better than others. I work with 2 now that are awesome. They encurage NCB, don't do elective c-sections unless it's a repeat, VBAC often, and support the mothers feeding/circ/vax decisions. The baby rooms in unless the mother asks for it to be taken for awhile.

    The hospital where I had my daughter wasn't so good. After 32 hours of labor and dealing with almost 10 hours of Pit without pain meds I was moved to c-section for failure to progress past 7cm. Baby was fine...I wasn't. I was exhausted, in pain, and very emotional. My ex was with me at the time and helped me with the baby over night. He had to work the next morning and he asked the nurses to take the baby for a few hours so I could sleep. We were bottle feeding due to meds that I was on so it shouldn't have been a big deal. I was in tears I was so tired. He waited for them to come and take her and he got me settled in to sleep. He left and 10 minutes later they bring the baby back. They left me in tears holding her. He called me around the time they were supposed to bring her back and was shocked to find out that they brought her back after he'd had time to leave.
  10. Visit  rn/writer} profile page
    1
    Highly mom-unfriendly. And just a darn shame. I'm sorry you had such a negative experience. How great that you work at hospitals that handle things better.
    Esme12 likes this.
  11. Visit  RNMom2010} profile page
    1
    My amazing, wonderful night nurse who OFFERED to take my son to the nursery and feed him a bottle as needed was my angel from heaven!! The LC who were very helpful, but not pushy were great. I would have been a very angry, hormonal, psycho PP woman if someone had taken my choices away r/t my son and me. About the time a nurse or LC started preaching their agenda on me I would have promptly, if not rudely asked them to leave my room. It's great to educate and leave reading materials, but it should be the choice of the mother if she bottle or breast feeds, or if she rooms in or sends baby out to get some much needed rest.
    rn/writer likes this.
  12. Visit  jolee.marie} profile page
    0
    i feel that breast feeding should be given a chance before a mother just up and decides to formula feed unless there is a legitament medical reason for having to formula feed. i also feel that rooming in should be given a chance before the mother decides to pawn her baby off to the nurses. not all hospitals have a nurse readily available to do nothing but sit in the nursery and take care of the babies all day long. the hospital in my town have labor and delivery nurses working every aspect of L&D, not just set positions. but i agree with the OP that it should be pushed upon mothers the way her hospital is trying to do. mothers should be educated on the subjects at hand and then make a decision based on the information they have. and for a nurse to flat out tell a mother no about taking the baby for a bit is just wrong. we as nurses are there to help and care for mothers and babies.
  13. Visit  Esme12} profile page
    1
    Quote from rn/writer
    While that is the ideal, it may not be feasible for families with other children who don't have close friends or relatives able to help them out. If there is no one to take those kids, dad goes home with them and mom is on her own with the new baby. And, too, there are far too many women (some just girls really) who either do not have a committed partner or whose partner won't be staying overnight with them.

    As for the baby-dropping and baby-squishing, a mom doesn't need narcs to arrive at a state where she no longer remembers her own name. Some of these moms labored for two+ days before delivering. And there are plenty of them who haven't slept comfortably for several weeks before the birth. Add to that the rush of visitors that insist they must see the baby right away before it goes home, and you can end up with a woman who feels drugged even if she isn't.

    I just can't see telling any mom she has to keep the baby in her room. That smacks of the same harshness and disrespect that occurred years ago when moms were told they had to leave the babies in the nursery. Neither extreme is right for everyone. And neither edict should be coming from the nurses on the unit.

    It makes me really sad to hear about hospitals deliberately eliminating nurseries so that moms will have to have their babies room in. That just doesn't take care of everyone effectively. And it's a dirty trick to play on women who didn't think to ask ahead of time if they'll be able to catch a couple of hours of uninterrupted sleep before they go home.

    It's a terrible thing to do to nurses, too. I've heard many of them say they'd be more than willing to give the mom a break except that they have no place to put the baby and no one to watch it.

    Do we really have to handle things this way? Or can we be halfway reasonable, provide the proper resources, and trust moms to do what is right for themselves and their babies?
    Well said......
    sharpeimom likes this.
  14. Visit  PNCC2001} profile page
    1
    I am a Doula with a nursing background; and not a radical Doula. I respect medical and nursing staffs when I am in the hospitals and I do not confront them regarding medical decisions; although I know there are some bad ones out there that do. I find this discussion about Baby-Friendly Hospitals interesting. Some of the posters seem to feel that mothers should be educated and have "choices". That's fine, but it seems a little funny to me. The hospitals that I work at, do not provide FULL informed consent when it comes to Pitocin, epidurals, etc. They provide only partial information, and dismiss the seriousness of any possible side effects to mother or baby. They most certainly do not disclose how often those interventions result in C-Sections. They routinely start IV's, run Pitocin and offer epidurals; unless the mother specifically says that she does not want them. They also do not promote breastfeeding, automatically give the babies pacifiers and do not call in an LC, unless requested by the mother. Are these mothers being given "choices"? NO!
    The Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization are beyond the BFHI; because its practices are BEST for babies. According the the CDC the majority of hospitals around the county, not just here, do not encourage breastfeeding, use drugs during labor and delivery that affect breastfeeding and routinely give pacifiers, which also affects breastfeeding. I have given birth myself; one labor was 29 hours with an OP baby, I know how exhausing it is. I am all for babies going to the nursery if mom needs to sleep after delivery; with the baby being brought to her for breastfeeding - but not being given a bottle because the nurse didn't want to wake her. Many routine medical practices are not evidenced-based and are not what is best for babies and mothers. We need to re-evaluate our birth practices.
    melmarie23 likes this.

Need Help Searching For Someone's Comment? Enter your keywords in the box below and we will display any comment that matches your keywords.



Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

Top