Any CNMs in Florida?

  1. Hoping to eventually train to be a CNM and work in Florida. Are you a CNM working in Florida or elsewhere? Where do you work and what does your job involve? What kind of hours do you work and do you do out of hospital births as well as in hospital? What sort of a salary do you earn? I wonder what the job prospects will be like for CNMs as I hear there are big problems with liability insurance. I am UK midwife and will have to initially work in US as a L&D nurse. Actually dreading it....My impression is US maternity care very medicalised and nurses dont catch babies unless doc doesnt make it! Would love someone to tell me otherwise!! Would love to hear from anyone with any views...
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   Energizer Bunny
    I also have aspirations of being a midwife in Florida...that is, until I read about the wages in Florida. We are looking at all of our options, though we wanted to move to Orlando to be near more of our family. I'll be anxious to see any replies you get to this thread.
  4. by   tamrnmomof4
    I am a labor and delivery nurse who works in central florida, we have 5 CNMs who deliver at our hospital Lakeland Regional Medical Center. The hospital in the next city over also delivers with CNMs. Good Luck!
  5. by   midwife sarah
    Thanks for your reply. Great to hear you have CNMs working in your hospital. What do they do and what sort of hours do they work? Do you know anything about their malpractice insurance. I heard that is a problem as it is so expensive. Do they promote normal birth within the unit? How do the nurses feel about them and do they work in collaboration? Would love to hear your point of view on this. Thanks again........
    Quote from tamrnmomof4
    I am a labor and delivery nurse who works in central florida, we have 5 CNMs who deliver at our hospital Lakeland Regional Medical Center. The hospital in the next city over also delivers with CNMs. Good Luck!
  6. by   mitchsmom
    Quote from midwife sarah
    Thanks for your reply. Great to hear you have CNMs working in your hospital. What do they do and what sort of hours do they work? Do you know anything about their malpractice insurance. I heard that is a problem as it is so expensive. Do they promote normal birth within the unit? How do the nurses feel about them and do they work in collaboration? Would love to hear your point of view on this. Thanks again........
    I am going to school to be a CNM also (BSN program now)... I know that there are also CNM's in Ft. Myers, Tampa, Gainesville, Miami, Jacksonville, Orlando and Stuart.. I'm assuming they are in most bigger areas at least. I'm in a rural county where they have been effectively banned from delivering by the physicians in town. They are apparently too threatened by the thought. Among other things, they made a rule that CNM's can't deliver without a physician present and they can't make rounds. I've heard that we have a couple of CNM's employed at our health department, but they just do well checks, etc.
    Jennie Joseph is a midwife in Orlando that I met at a conference several years ago, she was trained in England, she is CPM (not nurse-midwife), her website: http://www.orlandomidwife.com/staff.htm
    She may be able to discuss a lot of this with you.
    What you say about malpractice is true, but sometimes is paid by the practice you are employed with. Most CNM's here are in practice with OB/GYN physicians, although some are in private practice, birth center practice, etc. (all must have a physician affiliation for back ups for transfers/emergencies of course). Some practices have had to close because of the malpractice problems. The ACNM lobbies for better midwife compensation from medicare, etc.. but it is hard to fight other bigger entities.
    CNM's here provide well-woman care (PAP smears, exams, etc.) as well as pregnancy/birth care. Some become qualified to do more technical gynecological procedures (can't remember which ones they may do at the moment), some also perform as first assists in surgery with the physicians for c-sections.
    Hospitals vary widely in how much they support normal birth, I would say. It also varies widely from nurse to nurse within a unit. But you should have a good amount of freedom to be supportive with your own patient (anyone correct me if I'm wrong there).
    It is the goal and philosophy to support normal and non-interventionist births, however some CNM's here have become more interventionist under pressure from patients and/or their practice (i.e. patient demands to be induced, or you have 20 patients waiting back in the office/time constraints, etc...). Some are being called "medwives".

    There is a lot of information at www.acnm.org, the U.S.'s professional organization for CNM's. Best wishes!
    Last edit by mitchsmom on Mar 26, '04
  7. by   CatskillsRN
    Yes big problems see Presbiterian Hospital in Manhattan, Seton BC in Manhattan etc....
    the only way to get out of this misery is to have your own practice, and to fight for hospital priviledges...
    I know some HB CNM that are just going w/o malpractice insurance period...

    scary Huh?
    ============
    Some practices have had to close because of the malpractice problems. The ACNM lobbies for better midwife compensation from medicare, etc.. but it is hard to fight other bigger entities.
    CNM's here provide well-woman care (PAP smears, exams, etc.) as well as pregnancy/birth care. Some become qualified to do more technical gynecological procedures (can't remember which ones they may do at the moment), some also perform as first assists in surgery with the physicians for c-sections.
    Hospitals vary widely in how much they support normal birth, I would say. It also varies widely from nurse to nurse within a unit. But you should have a good amount of freedom to be supportive with your own patient (anyone correct me if I'm wrong there).
    It is the goal and philosophy to support normal and non-interventionist births, however some CNM's here have become more interventionist under pressure from patients and/or their practice (i.e. patient demands to be induced, or you have 20 patients waiting back in the office/time constraints, etc...). Some are being called "medwives".

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