? About not breastfeeding - page 7

Hello, I am not looking for a big debate or anything. I just want to know if nurses, in general, look down on moms who choose not to breastfeed. Not because of a medical reason, just because mom... Read More

  1. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from TweetiePieRN
    I did note that. Wondering where she got her stats. In lecture, our instructors would usually share their source of statistics...thought maybe your instructor did too.
    Nope. My OB instructor is an old-school nurse practitioner who specializes in postpartum and peds. She was just sharing some of her biased observations with the students. Also, she works full time as a healthcare provider at a clinic that serves primarily low-income patients, which may influence her thinking on this issue.
  2. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Nope. My OB instructor is an old-school nurse practitioner who specializes in postpartum and peds. She was just sharing some of her biased observations with the students. Also, she works full time as a healthcare provider at a clinic that serves primarily low-income patients, which may influence her thinking on this issue.
    Oh I see!
  3. by   fergus51
    I don't know why people get defensive when someone tells them about the benefits of breastfeeding ("Well, I wasn't breastfed and I'm just fine!"). There are benefits to it over formula. That's just a fact. That doesn't mean it will work for everyone or your a bad mother if you don't breastfeed, but being non-judgemental doesn't mean you have to ignore the research out there showing the benefits of breastmilk.
  4. by   fergus51
    Quote from NurseWilliam
    I have heard the same from a host of L&D and LC RNs. But ironically, one of the major risk factors for NEC is early enteral feeding (Wong et al., 2002). In light of that, I wonder if it is possible that the preemie's gut at a certain point simply may not be mature enough to tolerate anything, including mother's milk? I could be wrong on that, and I am open to correction. But again, evidence of the certainly supports the benefits of the practice of providing preemies with mother's milk when and if at all possible. [/SIZE]
    Almost all of the research I've read supports early enteral feeding (trophic feeding). Certain babies will get NEC regardless thanks to other issues (poor gut perfusion, infection, indocin, etc) but formula is simply harder to digest for them.
  5. by   StuNurseUP
    Quote from fergus51
    I don't know why people get defensive when someone tells them about the benefits of breastfeeding ("Well, I wasn't breastfed and I'm just fine!"). There are benefits to it over formula. That's just a fact. That doesn't mean it will work for everyone or your a bad mother if you don't breastfeed, but being non-judgemental doesn't mean you have to ignore the research out there showing the benefits of breastmilk.
    Thankyou fergus51
  6. by   hospitalstaph
    Quote from StuNurseUP
    Thankyou fergus51
    I also thank you fergus!!!!
  7. by   fergus51
    Well, you're welcome one and all
  8. by   Schmoo1022
    As a nurse and a new mom, I was so overwhelmed. I KNEW "Breast is best", I went to a breastfeeding class prior to giving birth, I was GOING to breast feed! I cannot tell you what a terrible time I had. I had flat nipples and a baby that turned into a screaming, red tomato when I couldn't get it right!! I ended up pumping for quite awhile, but that even seemed to be looked down on by some nurses
  9. by   StuNurseUP
    All you can do is try! You put forth the effort to educate yourself and give breastfeeding a shot. You did more than many moms do by attempting to pump as well. Congradulations to you:hatparty: ! I am sorry it didn't work out, I am sure that was frustrating and discouraging . I think that you are you good mom, don't let anyone get you down about not brestfeeding, sometimes it doesn't work out. I wish you and your wee one well.
  10. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from Schmoo1022
    As a nurse and a new mom, I was so overwhelmed. I KNEW "Breast is best", I went to a breastfeeding class prior to giving birth, I was GOING to breast feed! I cannot tell you what a terrible time I had. I had flat nipples and a baby that turned into a screaming, red tomato when I couldn't get it right!! I ended up pumping for quite awhile, but that even seemed to be looked down on by some nurses
    Same scenario here! I even posted on Allnurses for help and one woman in particular was just reaming me at every turn. Nothing I did was right and she was a so-called expert lac consultant. I just learned that there are going to be many choices we make as parents, its no one else's concern and we do it all out of love for our children. Sorry you had a rough time too!
  11. by   Mrs.S
    I haven't really noticed a negative attitude toward bottlefeeding moms among the nurses I work with. I have noticed a lot of practices that seem to "sabotage" breastfeeding, however! Whisking babies off to the nursery after delivery to have their admission stuff done because it's more convenient for the nurse, giving them "treats" in the nursery at night, circ'ing boys who aren't yet nursing well, etc.
    There was a nurse i used to work with who, if a mom was having a tough time for whatever reason...fussy baby, sore nipples, baby not latching well, baby doing a lot of cluster-feeding...would go in and say things like "breastfeeding isn't for everyone," or, "would you like to try giving a bottle?" rather than support and provide information. she was almost proud of it, like she was doing us all a favor that we wouldn't have to spend our time helping that mom with breastfeeding anymore.
    The lactation consultants I work with are amazing. They work so hard, are almost always willing to drop what they are doing to come help get a kid to latch, and provide awesome support to breastfeeding moms. They just have so many nurses working against them, so to speak, that sometimes I think they push back a little, and then they are labeled "milk nazi" (or whatever.)

    just a bit different perspective.
  12. by   StuNurseUP
    When I delivered I gave explicit instructions that my baby was to stay with me at all time and wasn't to recieve anything orally but breast milk. the lab tech wanted to give my baby sugar water while drawing blood. (New research says that or breastfeeding will reduce pain for infants)
    I told her no that I would nurse her while the bloodwork was bieng done, but they refused b/c the lab tech wasn't comfortable. Then a battle axe from med-surg floated over and told me that she'd "have to" take my baby for the night b/c I needed my rest. I told her no, that Sara was to stay with me. SHe says " No hon you need some sleep and tried to walk out with my baby!:angryfire Big mistake. No one interferes with me and my baby.
    Seperating a mom and baby or giving other oral fluids to a new baby is detrimental to breast feeding. Some nursing practices need to be altered
  13. by   Mrs.S
    Another thought I had is how our personal experiences/values/choices can affect the care we give our patients. The nurses I mentioned in my last post tend to be either the very young ones with no kids, or the ones who bottlefed their kids and are very vocal/defensive about it ("I bottlefed my three babies and they all turned out fine!")
    So, for example, while I happily breastfed my two kids into toddlerhood, we all agree I should not be laying guilt trips on my bottlefeeding moms in hopes of somehow "converting" them to the joys of breastfeeding. Likewise, nurses who themselves chose not to breastfeed should not attempt to downplay its benefits and importance to their breastfeeding moms. we need to put our own values aside while we provide lots of unbiased, accurate information and lots of support for whichever way our patient chooses to feed her baby.

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