? About not breastfeeding - page 5

Hello, I am not looking for a big debate or anything. I just want to know if nurses, in general, look down on moms who choose not to breastfeed. Not because of a medical reason, just because mom... Read More

  1. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Here's my $0.02 on this issue.

    When I was a student, my OB clinical instructor said that hospitals that serve upper middle-class clients tend to encourage breastfeeding and have up to 90 percent of new moms breastfeeding upon discharge. Also, the vast majority of these upper middle-class women deliver vaginally if possible.

    My OB clinical instructor also said that hospitals in lower socioeconomic areas with high numbers of Medicaid recipients tend to have almost zero moms who breastfeed at discharge. Also, 70 percent of the women deliver by cesarean.

    I think educational level often influences whether a mother will breastfeed and how she will deliver.
    Ok, well I have a bachelors degree and needed a c/s and was not able to breastfeed. Explain that one. Where did you get your statistics on this, because I have never heard this one?

    I made an educated choice on having the c/s since the baby's placenta was a grade 3, his heart rate was in the 90s, and his amniotic fluid was very low, and I had CPD, also he was 2 weeks late. Another educated choice about breastfeeding...I had to give up that or give up my life...I was having severe ppd and I was contemplating suicide. I luckily got help, but something had to give and it was the breastfeeding.
  2. by   DutchgirlRN
    My daughter was educated on the pros of breastfeeding and chose not to breastfeed. I feel the decision is solely hers. Her pediatrician told her that he was not concerned that the baby would be on formula. He said later when he's in class no one will be able to tell which children were breastfed and which weren't or who was cir'd and who wasn't. I did breastfed her and her brother and loved it.
  3. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from StuNurseUP
    In a research collection I have read, Breastfeeding and Human Lactation,
    It states that women have to be severley malnourished (think Sub Saharan Africa) for them not to pass on proper nutrition to thier babies. Your body just uses your vitamin stores.
    I don't want to make moms do something they aren't comfortable with. At the same time I would like too kno why moms in general aren't comfortable with it and what we as asociety can do to fix it.
    Research is great, but first hand experience is better sometimes. I have seen women during my public health rotation, that come in with their teeth almost falling out because the fetus is robbing them of all their calcium. They are frail, almost skeleton like, and the programs implemented just give them the basic necessities to get by. Yes, they are passing proper nutrition to their babies because it is being taken away from the mother. Certain women, like the ones I have mentioned, have little left to give from their vitamin stores. This is an extreme case and not really the ones we are discussing, but I felt the need to point this out none the less.
  4. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from CEG
    From the side of the person choosing not to breastfeed...

    I had some postpartum depression issues and attributed my problems to that and the stress of my husband being deployed.

    It was really starting to affect my mental state, so I decided to give up on the breastfeeding.
    Just wanted to add another point of view.
    It sounds as if I wrote this LOL! Same thing over here. I honestly did try everything I could. Heck, I even did a huge bf project in nursing school, went to a lactation class, etc.

    For those of you who were fortunate to not have Postpartum Depression (not just the blues...I mean Depression!) you cannot imagine what it's like. If I did not have it, but only had bf issues, I probably could have tried longer than 2 weeks to bf. When you are battling this demon of depression, you do not have the patience, will, or even care to continue doing something that is not working.
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    Research is great, but first hand experience is better sometimes. I have seen women during my public health rotation, that come in with their teeth almost falling out because the fetus is robbing them of all their calcium. They are frail, almost skeleton like, and the programs implemented just give them the basic necessities to get by. Yes, they are passing proper nutrition to their babies because it is being taken away from the mother. Certain women, like the ones I have mentioned, have little left to give from their vitamin stores. This is an extreme case and not really the ones we are discussing, but I felt the need to point this out none the less.
    This actually sounds like the moms on meth in my community. Their rotten teeth are the first clue and the skeletal look is the second.

    Not saying this is what you are seeing . ..but it sure sounds like what we see.

    Is anyone really that malnourished in America if they are not on drugs? I'm wondering what kind of conditions these women are suffering from?

    steph
  6. by   StuNurseUP
    I am not trying to be abrasive.I don't want moms to be uncomfortable. I am not talking about situations where it is counterproductive to breastfeed; emotional distress, physiological issues, etc. I just want to know why as a society we don't breast feed when we know it is the best. I know a lot of bottle feeders get defensive about this issue, many people try to guilt them and they guilt themselves unnnecessarily. I am not trying to cast blame around on mothers who don't breastfeed. I just think alot of mothers do not get a full education about why and how to breastfeed thier babies. I am trying to advocate for a helpless infant who benefits from mom holding and touching them while they feed. (Many moms, GOOD moms, prop thier baby up with a bottle and do something else) It is good for mom and baby to have this sit-down time. I realize that there are many reasons why some mothers can't breastfeed; that is what formula is for! I don't believe that it should be a an either/or choice. If you need it you should have it, if you don't let your bundle of joy have the benefits that they deserve from mommys wonderful breastmilk. Decreased allergies, fewer ear and respitory infections, decreased rate of childhood CANCER, and decreased rate of diabetes. I am not trying to be abrasive, I just want our future generations to have the best future imaginable. (also according to research: breastfed babies have a higher IQ, even after the population is adjusted for socioeconomic factors)
  7. by   StuNurseUP
    I wish all moms could have at-home visits postpartum. It might really help with early detection of PPD.It really is a serious issue. New mommies need more support from family and society
  8. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from StuNurseUP
    I wish all moms could have at-home visits postpartum. It might really help with early detection of PPD.It really is a serious issue. New mommies need more support from family and society
    We send moms home too soon and don't follow up very well. Makes me sad.

    steph
  9. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from stevielynn
    This actually sounds like the moms on meth in my community. Their rotten teeth are the first clue and the skeletal look is the second.

    Not saying this is what you are seeing . ..but it sure sounds like what we see.

    Is anyone really that malnourished in America if they are not on drugs? I'm wondering what kind of conditions these women are suffering from?

    steph
    No. I know exactly what you are talking about though and we saw those types of mothers too. We saw almost every kind of drug addiction and high risk pregnancy in that short little public health rotation....it really blew my socks off and opened my eyes to a whole new world. This lady was severly malnourished. She was living off nothing but the government program supply of cheese, powdered milk (which she was watering down to make it last longer between visits), some food stamps, and a skimpy disability check. She had eight children, 5 of which had not been taken by DHS, and lots of other issues. But she was not on drugs. Just very poor and very uneducated. And there were other women from this particular community that were running a close second to her as well.
  10. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from StuNurseUP
    I am not trying to be abrasive.I don't want moms to be uncomfortable. I am not talking about situations where it is counterproductive to breastfeed; emotional distress, physiological issues, etc. I just want to know why as a society we don't breast feed when we know it is the best. I know a lot of bottle feeders get defensive about this issue, many people try to guilt them and they guilt themselves unnnecessarily. I am not trying to cast blame around on mothers who don't breastfeed. I just think alot of mothers do not get a full education about why and how to breastfeed thier babies. I am trying to advocate for a helpless infant who benefits from mom holding and touching them while they feed. (Many moms, GOOD moms, prop thier baby up with a bottle and do something else) It is good for mom and baby to have this sit-down time. I realize that there are many reasons why some mothers can't breastfeed; that is what formula is for! I don't believe that it should be a an either/or choice. If you need it you should have it, if you don't let your bundle of joy have the benefits that they deserve from mommys wonderful breastmilk. Decreased allergies, fewer ear and respitory infections, decreased rate of childhood CANCER, and decreased rate of diabetes. I am not trying to be abrasive, I just want our future generations to have the best future imaginable. (also according to research: breastfed babies have a higher IQ, even after the population is adjusted for socioeconomic factors)
    The old timers living into their 90s were not all breastfed. They used to use condensed milk as formula! I'm sure you can agree that the formula that exists today is way more acceptable than the older versions. But, amazingly there are humans alive and WELL today who were not breastfed. My husband was not. They are healthy folk, no allergies, high IQs, no cancers in the family hx...maybe its just anecdotal.

    I have several friends who have new babies and NONE of us prop the bottles. This is actually very dangerous. We all "hold and touch" our babies while feeding them. We are very hands-on moms. Realize that just because one breastfeeds does not equal they are being more loving. I hold my baby close to my chest and lovingly look into his eyes while feeding him from a bottle. I sing to him, we hold hands, he puts his little fingers in my mouth. I feel very bonded to him. During my horrible breastfeeding experience...I could not even see his face my breasts are too huge. So I was not bonding with him.

    Now, I think the reason society is not breastfeeding at the rate you would like to see...maybe because it takes 2 incomes just to make ends meet anymore. If more people were able to be SAHM then you would probably see more of it. At my job...I don't have time to take more than a 30 min lunch break. So, pumping would have been out of the question. Most women only get 6 weeks off postpartum out here.

    Maybe another reason could be since a mother is the sole source of food for the recommended one year...how can she ever break away and have some moments for herself? I am human and need a break once in a while. If there is no option for a bottle, then the mom is the sole person responsible for feedings.

    Realize that most cancers have no real cause. I don't know what study you are referring to, but I have learned that it's relatively easy to find any study/statistics to support whatever we want them to. We can thank the internet for that.
  11. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from StuNurseUP
    I am not trying to be abrasive.I don't want moms to be uncomfortable. I am not talking about situations where it is counterproductive to breastfeed; emotional distress, physiological issues, etc. I just want to know why as a society we don't breast feed when we know it is the best. I know a lot of bottle feeders get defensive about this issue, many people try to guilt them and they guilt themselves unnnecessarily. I am not trying to cast blame around on mothers who don't breastfeed. I just think alot of mothers do not get a full education about why and how to breastfeed thier babies. I am trying to advocate for a helpless infant who benefits from mom holding and touching them while they feed. (Many moms, GOOD moms, prop thier baby up with a bottle and do something else) It is good for mom and baby to have this sit-down time. I realize that there are many reasons why some mothers can't breastfeed; that is what formula is for! I don't believe that it should be a an either/or choice. If you need it you should have it, if you don't let your bundle of joy have the benefits that they deserve from mommys wonderful breastmilk. Decreased allergies, fewer ear and respitory infections, decreased rate of childhood CANCER, and decreased rate of diabetes. I am not trying to be abrasive, I just want our future generations to have the best future imaginable. (also according to research: breastfed babies have a higher IQ, even after the population is adjusted for socioeconomic factors)
    I think if we made it a more comfortable environment, more women would be open to learning. But just look at how many posters on this thread have referred to LC's as breast nazis and milk nazis......seems like there is some pushing going on that is not well received. Not the case everywhere, but still too much.

    I agree with steph too that women are being sent home too early.

    As far as research out there that 'suggests' babies who are breastfed have higher IQs. That is a bunch of bull. (to put it nicely) There is considerable amount of research that counters that argument, not to mention that IQ tests have been proven to be extremely flawed in their methods of measuring cognitive and developmental achievement and potential.

    I am not against bottle feeding moms. Women have much busier lives today, than in the past decades. Plus, there are not many breastfeeding friendly public places. Breast pumps are quite expensive as well, especially if you are already trying to make ends meat. Its just a lot more complicated than not having the proper technique, the education, or even what you really WANT to do.....sometimes it is just logistically not going to work.
  12. by   tntrn
    I personally know of two moms who, after the first few days, never breastfed at the breast. Instead, they pumped and bottle fed that to their babies. Talk about nipple confusion! (Which I personally don't believe in, especially when you talk to moms from other countries.) So much for all that bonding.

    And I also can attest to some formula feeding moms who always held and rocked during feeds. I am one of those. That special time was no less special for me because I wasn't breastfeeding. My kids are healthy, have beautiful teeth, have no allergies and are productive in society. My daughter graduated with a 4.0 from high school and is currently acing all her classes in a radiography program.

    I don't think you can quote a study (once again, you can prove what you want depending on how you conduct it) to categorically say that breastfeeding is best. It may be best for the baby, but a baby joins a family, and while things must and do change to accommodate a new member, everything shouldn't change. In some cases the baby has to be assimilated in to fit the family dynamics.

    In my own personal case, I just never had the desire to even try to breastfeed. And no, I don't have intimacy issues. Just didn't want to do it. So I did the best d*mned job of formula feeding ever. My choice. I fail to see where any of my breastfeeding friends have any better relationship with their kids than I do, or that my kids are any less in any way than theirs are.

    The whole "agenda" to breastfeed is taking on a life of its own, and I find that a bit offputting. If my patients want to breastfeed, I'll help them as much as I can. If they don't, I help them no less, because sometimes they need that encouragement to know they're not bad moms, or ruining their kids' lives way more than the breastfeeders do. Too often, they are treated like lepers even by their own friends and family. That is just so wrong and certainly does nothing to bolster their own confidance. If I can give them even a little bit of that in the short time we have them, I will. In the end, it is their choice, period.
  13. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from StuNurseUP
    I wish all moms could have at-home visits postpartum. It might really help with early detection of PPD.It really is a serious issue. New mommies need more support from family and society
    That would be a great idea. Unfortunately I am a great actress and no one would have ever picked me as one to have ppd. I am the happiest outgoing person you could meet. I, to this day, am shocked that I actually had the thoughts I did. I luckily had lots of support. Once I admitted what was going thru my head, it was off to the docs I go.

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