Questions for UK nurses who have made the move to the USA - page 3

Hi Guys As you know Im at the beggining of this long and winding process and although have done a huge amount of research and got lots of useful information from here I ahve a couple of questions... Read More

  1. by   Belinda-wales
    If you apply to get a work related visa as a nurse in the USA you and your married partner and all your children under 21yrs will get a green card once you have been through visa screen and CAN work in the USA this is DEFO!!!
  2. by   madwife2002
    Mrs OG you need to phone me as your Number was on my old phone lol
  3. by   madwife2002
    Life is very difficult at first when you emigrate for the majority of people and until you start to make friends and become familiar then you will struggle. There are one or two people who dont have a problem but trust me I know lots of people from the UK who dont settle as quick as you would like.
    If anything goes wrong like an illness then believe me you will never feel as lonely in all your life.
    Once you get through the first year or so things really improve. But it is important to remember things are not greener on the other side.
    You will encounter some predudice which will infuriate you, but again once you settle you realise that it is a ignorance of life in the UK. News of oversea's current events is limited so unless you have an interest in another country then you will never hear about them.

    People are really friendly but they are not your friends-at home people are only really friendly with you because they want to be your friend, that is not neccessary the case here-people are just nice they dont want to be your friend. I dunno if this makes sense or not.
  4. by   insa
    Quote from madwife2002
    Life is very difficult at first when you emigrate for the majority of people and until you start to make friends and become familiar then you will struggle. There are one or two people who dont have a problem but trust me I know lots of people from the UK who dont settle as quick as you would like.
    If anything goes wrong like an illness then believe me you will never feel as lonely in all your life.
    Once you get through the first year or so things really improve. But it is important to remember things are not greener on the other side.
    You will encounter some predudice which will infuriate you, but again once you settle you realise that it is a ignorance of life in the UK. News of oversea's current events is limited so unless you have an interest in another country then you will never hear about them.

    People are really friendly but they are not your friends-at home people are only really friendly with you because they want to be your friend, that is not neccessary the case here-people are just nice they dont want to be your friend. I dunno if this makes sense or not.
    I think this is exactly right! Americans tend to think the British are very withdrawn and reserved because they don't behave in a friendly way unless they want to be friends. The British can find it rather uncomfortable when Americans seem very friendly almost as soon as they know you.

    And it's easy to think that because you speak the same language, the culture is the same in both countries. It really isn't. So it's a very common experience to like everything for the first month or two, then find it a bit depressing to be away from home for several months - even a year. On balance though, most people I've met who have crossed the Atlantic in either direction are really glad they did.
  5. by   Tanvi Tusti
    Quote from insa
    I think this is exactly right! Americans tend to think the British are very withdrawn and reserved because they don't behave in a friendly way unless they want to be friends. The British can find it rather uncomfortable when Americans seem very friendly almost as soon as they know you.
    Its funny how things are seen differently. My husband is American and has lived here in the UK for just over 2 years now. He said the same thing about the English at first, that people dont seem quite as friendly. Now his opinion has done a major turnaround. He likes the English reserve enormously. He sees it as very refreshing. His slant on it is that in the US Americans tend to be overly friendly to everyone, thats the culture, especially within the service industry etc, and that a lot of it is fake. When you turn your back they ***** about you. Here however, he says people are just as they are. You get a stroppy Tesco checkout girl and he loves it! So refreshing he says! :chuckle
  6. by   ak09
    Quote from cheryl nairn
    Hi Clair,Get across to OZ they are desperate for Toolmakers and Nurses, Having researched both countries OZ has more to offer both Parties.
    Does your bubby really want to stack shelves in WalMart for $6.00 or 3.00 per hour!!!!!.

    Start taping Wanted Down Under on BBC 1 weekdays at 09.15 the program showed a toolmaker last friday somebody must have a copy.

    Rhode Island may sound good but if your Hubby is on that kind of whats he gonna feel like??.

    Toolmaker and Nurse are both on the Skills Shortage List of Employees and you could be in Oz within 3-4 month not 3-4 yrs.

    Cheryl x
    I watch 'wanted down under' and I am set on going to the us (florida) but this programme did make me think.
    I mentioned it to dh but he is not impressed it's us all the way.
    He is a teacher here in Liverpool and he again doesn't want to teach when he gets to florida, but reading your post's he couldn't do anything else!!

    Does anyone know if teaching pays well in the us?

    Ang x
  7. by   english_nurse
    not sure about wages but i think there would be a problem with translation of qualifications into USA recognised ones
    visit www,britishexpats.com there are a few teachers on the USA part of the site who have made the move to the USA system.
  8. by   ak09
    Quote from english_nurse
    not sure about wages but i think there would be a problem with translation of qualifications into USA recognised ones
    visit www,britishexpats.com there are a few teachers on the USA part of the site who have made the move to the USA system.

    Thanks english nurse,
    I will look on this site

    Ang x
  9. by   Bibagirl
    Insa,
    I really appreciate your reply, and I've never heard a more true statement in my life: Just because the Americans and the British both speak the same language, you think the culture is the same.
    That fact surprised and shocked me, and it's something you never really get over. I always felt different to everyone, like I just didn't get it sometimes!
  10. by   insa
    Quote from ak09
    I watch 'wanted down under' and I am set on going to the us (florida) but this programme did make me think.
    I mentioned it to dh but he is not impressed it's us all the way.
    He is a teacher here in Liverpool and he again doesn't want to teach when he gets to florida, but reading your post's he couldn't do anything else!!

    Does anyone know if teaching pays well in the us?

    Ang x
    It's hard to get used to, but remember anything to do with government in the US is far more decentralized than in Britain. What this means for teacher wages is that it depends on which state you're in, or even which school district. Some big-city districts may pay well but would be an awful shock for any teacher experienced in a decent-quality British school. On the other hand, a wealthy suburban district may pay well and have (mostly) delightful pupils -- but watch out for awful demanding parents who will accuse you of not doing enough to help their wonder-children self-actualize their extensive innate gifts!

    There may be a tiny bit of difficulty translating credentials, but I suspect in most parts of the US, teaching is a bit like nursing: for a variety of reasons, labor supply very rarely catches up with demand.
  11. by   ak09
    Quote from insa
    It's hard to get used to, but remember anything to do with government in the US is far more decentralized than in Britain. What this means for teacher wages is that it depends on which state you're in, or even which school district. Some big-city districts may pay well but would be an awful shock for any teacher experienced in a decent-quality British school. On the other hand, a wealthy suburban district may pay well and have (mostly) delightful pupils -- but watch out for awful demanding parents who will accuse you of not doing enough to help their wonder-children self-actualize their extensive innate gifts!

    There may be a tiny bit of difficulty translating credentials, but I suspect in most parts of the US, teaching is a bit like nursing: for a variety of reasons, labor supply very rarely catches up with demand.

    Thanks insa, I thought as much, I know he would do well in florida, but he doesn't want to teach, however, I know that if he doesn't teach he will struggle to do something that rewards him.
    as for demanding parents, he works in a private fee paying school so he is used to that:roll

    any other info would be much appreciated

    Thanks ang x
  12. by   gymgirl
    I am a Practice nurse with an RGN qualification. I have been qualified 15 years. My partner is an electrican and we are both interested in relocating to Seattle, we have family and friends there. I understand there is alot of red tape. I am looking inot taking my NLEX exams but have been told by an agency that community jobs are hard to come by and I would be better off with acute nursing experience, also she said that finding jobs in Seattle may be hard. I am prepared to fid my own job once I have passed my NCLEX. Does anyone else have any ideas or help??? I feel a bit bogged down with red tape and visa stuff!!!
  13. by   LiverpoolJane
    You can apply for licensure via one of the Boards of Nursing yourself and they will evaluate your nurse training and say whether you can sit the NCLEX or not.
    I understand that there are some areas that it is difficult to get sponsorship for and the more acute / specialised areas are the ones advertised for overseas nurses. For instance I was working in a small private hospital doing mostly cosmetic procedures and was not able to find a sponsor as there is no shortage of nurses in this area. I had to move back into my acute speciality and have secured sponsorship.
    Although I am not very optomistic at the moment as it would seem the financial climate in the US is having an effect on staffing there and some hospitals are withdrawing their offers. Add this to retrogression and it looks a bit grim at this moment in time, but I would advise you to start the process - at least get your license. Then it would be a matter of seeing who is offerring sponsorship and in what specialities but they do tend to be acute med surg, theatre / recovery etc. Be prepared for a lot of frustration - I started over a year ago and have only just sat NCLEX.

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