Nursing in the UK - page 9

I am a registered nurse in the US, and I'd like to get some information on how nursing works in the UK...for example: 1. Are nurses called "Registered Nurses" or "Licensed Nurses" or are they... Read More

  1. Visit  donmurray} profile page
    0
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but when you buy insurance you are essentially trying to minimise the cost of your potential medical expenses by spreading the cost and the risk among all the other policyholders. You pay into a central pot, and hope that you will never actually need to draw on it. The potholders gamble that however much is paid in will cover the amount paid out. They also take a percentage for their time and expenses, and a bit of profit too.
    Universal Healthcare extends that concept to everyone. All taxpayers contribute, spreading the risk and cost as widely as possible. The pot is bigger than any insurance company's, and everyone is covered, on the basis of need. No having to pay twice, first for your own cover, and then in taxes for those unable to pay. No recovery costs for bad payers as there are no bills! No profits taken out of the pot to reduce the amount available for care. It's oversimplified, but what have I missed that is innately wrong?
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  3. Visit  gwenhyfar} profile page
    0
    Quote from donmurray
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but when you buy insurance you are essentially trying to minimise the cost of your potential medical expenses by spreading the cost and the risk among all the other policyholders. You pay into a central pot, and hope that you will never actually need to draw on it. The potholders gamble that however much is paid in will cover the amount paid out. They also take a percentage for their time and expenses, and a bit of profit too.
    Universal Healthcare extends that concept to everyone. All taxpayers contribute, spreading the risk and cost as widely as possible. The pot is bigger than any insurance company's, and everyone is covered, on the basis of need. No having to pay twice, first for your own cover, and then in taxes for those unable to pay. No recovery costs for bad payers as there are no bills! No profits taken out of the pot to reduce the amount available for care. It's oversimplified, but what have I missed that is innately wrong?
    That is a bit over simplified, but not totally. A large group of people buying say, hospitalization insurance from the company they work for, in my case, a hospital, pay a premium every pay period (2 weeks) for insurance coverage. With the type my children and I have, in addition to the premium, ($166) we have a "co-pay" for every service we use. Dr visit = $30, Medication - generic = $15, Brand = $30, non-formulary = $45. Everyone pays the co-pay. Dependent on whether or not you have a surgery or hospital stay, you may or may not use more costly services, which have a discount for members of the plan, then you pay the co-pay of what percentage the insurance doesn't pick up.
    As for the Universal Healthcare, I've no clue. I know the guy I dated in Scotland didn't have to pay for meds or Dr bills unless he went to someone practicing privately. He had a problem with a rotten tooth, and couldn't get in to one of the 2 (in Glasgow) dentists that accepted those patients, for a year. He had to see a specialist about a foot problem, and ended up paying extra, because no one else could get him in for about as long.
  4. Visit  fergus51} profile page
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    You called it Don. The US already has universal care to a certain extent because people can't be refused emergency treatment, but they aren't required to pay into the pot. So people like me wind up paying more in insurance premiums to make up for it. My HMO coverage is pretty cheap, but it also isn't very comprehensive.
  5. Visit  jjjez} profile page
    0
    Yeah, but the whole point of the NHS was to bypass people requiring health insurance so would be defeating th epoint really.
    Hmm... Private healthcare in this country isn't the all consuming entity that we are led to believe anyway, i mean, i can't say how many times i've heard of patients crashing in private hospitals and being carted to the NHS hospitals, or worse, private patients using NHS beds, because of medical privileges.
    I really think that we need to improve things ourselves as there is most likely a simple (ish) solution to this.
    I don't think insurance is the answer really as the divide between rich and poor would become greater, plus people with health insurance would still have to pay for NHS out of general taxation, which is kind of unfair.
    I think part of the problem with healthcare in this country is that nurses are actually central to the patient and healthcare delivery, yet we as a profession have very little influence in our locus of control, thus any improvements and advancements made are usually small scale and in a tiny remit.
    i wqould prefer to have a system that takes everyone and have people who would rather use private healthcare do so, however health insurance will stick a large gulf in between us.
    Lastly, we all know in Britain that privatization rarely works well, rarely is popular and rarely satisfies anyone (except money hungry govt.) e.g. trains, buses, PFI Hospitals etc. So let's stay nationalized for now eh?
  6. Visit  madwife2002} profile page
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    :Melody: [QUOTE=pej14]greetings from england!

    it's really amusing to read this thread as people are trying to outdo each other by maligning one another. i originally thought that people went to take up nursing as a career because they want to care for people who needed it. and the people who are recipients of that care do not really care whether you are trained in the US or UK or wherever, as long as you have a caring attitude and you know what you are doing, that is all that matters. but i will continue reading as i find it really entertaining.

    As regards you queries, may i first tell you that i was trained in asia, my nursing training patterned after that of the US but is now practicing here in the UK. I am currently working in the NHS, and to tell you honestly, at first i was not impressed - equipments wise -as back home i have used more advanced equipments. But nursing is not knowing how to use the most modern equipments, it is about being conscientious of the care you are giving another person. this is now my fifth year in the UK as a nurse.

    I am currently working in an infectious diseases unit - very interesting. I am respected by my colleagues for the knowledge that i am sharing with them and in return, they are happy showing me the way they do things. I am very fortunate to be working in a a very multi-culturally diverse unit, where everyone's contribution in the care of a patient is well appreciated. Whether the collegial relationship is vertical or horizontal, the multi-disciplinary team work together to achieve its purpose - to make the patient better.

    It is entirely up to the person whether they wanted to grow or remain stagnant in their post. i can say that opportunities are always available to better yourself, and the support is always there.

    Of course you may encounter the most horrible colleagues and patients, but if you are true to your calling, then i guess you can use that experience as way to improve yourself.

    i hope you'll have a great time when you become a full-pledged nurse. and please, be a good nurse.










    :Wow your principles are well grounded. I can understand why you are so highly respected. I want you to work for me.

    Kay
  7. Visit  DavidFR} profile page
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    Quote from jjjez
    IF you can tell us the last time we had a tax cut i'll give you a fifty!!! And it's also because we have a bit more traction on lifes road of problems, considering france riots everytime the students are angry or blocades ports when the farmers subsidies aren't high enough. we cant vote for tax cuts.
    Perhaps you're not old enough to remember, but we had several tax cuts under Thatcher's governments. It was her trump card at every election, Britons voted for it, and to finance it public services were bulldozed under her rule. Neil Kinnock lost his election bid because he made it plain he intended to put funds into the health service which would necessitate a tax rise.

    There have been no riots in France since 1968. I have lived here four years and never seen a "riot" Farmers protest and blockade at times because we live in a free society where the right to demonstrate is not met with excessive police force (something I witnessed in Britain over the poll tax, but then, that indeed was a riot, as were the race riots of St. Pauls, Brixton etc. Britain has a much better rioting record than France!) Unlike Britain, France is still an agricultural economy with many small farms and small businesses. People protest to try to protect that, rather than just giving in to the giants of agroalimentation who would leave us with no other choice but tasteless, cellophane wrapped, mass produced supermarket food. The Wallmartization of France? No thanks. Some things are worth protesting against.
  8. Visit  donmurray} profile page
    0
    "I am respected by my colleagues for the knowledge that i am sharing with them and in return, they are happy showing me the way they do things."
    I hope this was not meant to be so patronising of your colleagues as it appears to be....
  9. Visit  pej11uk} profile page
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    Hi donmurray,

    i can assure you that the statement you quoted wasn't meant in any way whatsoever, to patronise my colleagues. why should i, in the first place? i can also assure you that i strongly believe that the people i work with, wherever they may have been trained, are all mature enough to notice whether they are being patronised.

    people who think that they are patronised, only think so because they believe that they "REALLY ARE BETTER THAN EVERYONE ELSE", which unfortunately oftentimes is not the case.



    Quote from donmurray
    "I am respected by my colleagues for the knowledge that i am sharing with them and in return, they are happy showing me the way they do things."
    I hope this was not meant to be so patronising of your colleagues as it appears to be....
  10. Visit  madwife2002} profile page
    0
    Quote from Good_Queen_Bess
    I think there is a world of difference. Health care should be free on the basis of need. Not on the ability to pay. It's a person's life. What if you simply can't afford a "good" package.
    Just out of curiosity, how much is an "average" health insurance.
    I contacted Bupa and private health insurance for my family which consists of 2 adults and 2 children was 160 per month, aprox $300.
    We just couldnt afford it we pay around 400 per month National insurance between us per month.

    KaY
  11. Visit  celticqueen} profile page
    0
    Quote from Betty_SPN_KS
    Just out of curiosity, why are female charge nurses called sisters in the UK? Makes me think of nuns
    I believe it's because nuns used to nurse people many years ago (before there were "official" nurses)

    :hatparty:


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