mother dies after refusing blood transfusion - page 3

A very sad story from England.... Read More

  1. by   RainDreamer
    Those poor babies
  2. by   justme1972
    Sometimes I wonder if many JW's believe that they will ACTUALLY die or do they hope against hope that by some miracle they will survive?

    I have run into many JW's throughout the years that don't seem to have a very realistic view that blood additives don't fix everything that actual blood is necessary.

    What is also tragic is that this is an INTERPRETATION from the bible (because JW's think it's the same thing as drinking blood) and not anything it specifically states.

    Not to knock the religion, but I wonder why they are not vegetarians b/c anytime you eat meat, there is blood in the meat, you are just cooking it so it doesn't hurt you when you eat it.
  3. by   Djuna
    I cared for a beautiful 20 year old man with leukaemia who refused a blood transfusion due to his religious beliefs and subsequently died. Such dignity and peace in the face of tragedy, I was humbled and in awe how the family dealt with his passing.

    While I will never understand why people choose death over life, I will always uphold a patient's right to choose whether to accept medical care or decline it.
    Last edit by Djuna on Nov 8, '07 : Reason: grammar
  4. by   Sabby_NC
    We see it as a tragedy but the mother was following her faith.
    Now that to me takes a LOT of faith to know she is leaving her babies behind.
  5. by   JentheRN05
    I am NOT Jehovoas Witness or anything, but i know what it's like. I nearly coded with a a 3.4 count. I was delirious and refusing blood because of the chance of AIDS at the time (1989) Only way I survived was my mom, a nurse, came back to the hospital and stuck me. I said that was the only way I would take the blood. So they allowed it. I wouldn't be here otherwise. I was truly delirious. I kept passing out, couldn't move, terrible feeling. But I'm here 18 years later due to my mom.
  6. by   Glina
    i respect life more then anything. i am a mother, i have two girls, and i think that a mother has to be a mother first and then, after that, can be anything she wants. but, on the first place, and next 9, she has to be a mother and think about her children first. for me, there is no religion, no great cause or anything like that, which i would die for and leave my children without a mother. i would die only for them; everything else is just beyond me. for me, it is incredibly selfish, once you have children, to think about yourself, your beliefs or anything else before your children. to me, that is just primitive. i respect other opinions as i cannot change them, but, there is no greater cause except my children, except life itself.
  7. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from CyndieRN2007
    Sad, but it was her right to refuse. My heart breaks for the baby twins, to have to grow up without ever knowing their mother.
    That was my first thought but maybe it is somehow better for all concerned. I hope so.
  8. by   RN1980
    Quote from WindyHill
    Can you guarantee she would have lived with the blood transfusion?
    nope, but i can guarantee i'd bust my ass to save her life so she could see her childs first b-day, and i could goto bed at night without knowing i had to stand by with my hands in my pocket and say "well you know it's her right" yea, well it does'nt change the fact that a woman died and i'm glad i was'nt there.
  9. by   BULLYDAWGRN
    rn1980 i feel what you're saying but you still have to abide by the patients rights in the long run. never had a episode like that and hope i don't.
  10. by   RN1980
    oh no i'd let her die in peace and with all the dignity she could muster. but i believe i'd be alittle more upset than just saying "oh well you know it's her right" thats a hoqwash excuss to make yourself feel good, when you should feel ticked off. but what are you going to do.
  11. by   Djuna
    Informed consent is the basis of medical and nursing practice. If a person understands the risks and benefits of a certain procedure, it is their right to refuse unless it involves a child.

    I understand people's frustrations that someone would seemingly choose to die and leave behind 2 babies, however as health care professionals it is our job to ensure someone understands exactly what they are choosing. It is not our job to force or coerce a patient into accepting medical care just because it fits in with our values or ethical stance.

    I have worked in haematology and seen a few patients chose not to receive any more chemotherapy or refuse a bone marrow transplant. They died because of that choice but it was their life and their right to decide.

    As a nurse we act as a patient advocate despite whether their choices are within our frame of moral/ethical standards.
  12. by   Sabby_NC
    Quote from Djuna
    Informed consent is the basis of medical and nursing practice. If a person understands the risks and benefits of a certain procedure, it is their right to refuse unless it involves a child.

    I understand people's frustrations that someone would seemingly choose to die and leave behind 2 babies, however as health care professionals it is our job to ensure someone understands exactly what they are choosing. It is not our job to force or coerce a patient into accepting medical care just because it fits in with our values or ethical stance.

    I have worked in haematology and seen a few patients chose not to receive any more chemotherapy or refuse a bone marrow transplant. They died because of that choice but it was their life and their right to decide.

    As a nurse we act as a patient advocate despite whether their choices are within our frame of moral/ethical standards.

    Well said
  13. by   RGN1
    It's a difficult one this. I think you have to respect the patients wishes but I think it is hard when those beliefs are based on a book written in a different era.

    I'm a Christian but I would not interpret those passages like the Jehovas Witnesses do. I don't believe that God would ask you to die needlessly. Dying is not a test of faith in my book - just a needless waste - afterall you could argue that God allowed humans to discover how to do blood transfusions in order to help us prolong life where needed!

    There was an interesting comment on the radio the other day (in a discussion about just this) from a Moslem woman - she said that God would not expect you to take more than you could bear. She said that although eating pork is expressly forbidden in her faith preserving life was the ultimate thing. Therefore, if she was starving to death somewhere & the only thing available to eat was pork she would be obligated to eat that pork & preserve her life.

    Where I do have a problem is when parents are making these decisions for their children. I don't think that they should be able to stop their children from receiving life saving treatment for their faith because the children are not old enough to decide for themsleves yet if that's the path they want to follow. However, that's a whole other Pandoras box!

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