International Nurses and UK nursing - page 2

One of the topics that is raised frequently in the UK and International forums is how does an international nurse go about working in the UK. The replies are often negative and in general try to convey how very difficult this... Read More

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    Geralld firstly congratulations on your job offer. In answer to your question I am really not sure but I think that because your visa is dependent on your job offer and that job will require you to be registered with the NMC I suspect you will need that desicions letter first. I would advise you confirm this with the borders agency.

    Please keep us informed on your progress it's always good to hear positive experiences of nurses wanting to come to the UK to work

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  2. 0
    A quick question...
    I am an AIN in Australia and a s far as I understand my qualifications here do not amount to anything in the UK.
    Although have not been able to receive a straight answer about being a carer in the UK.
    Do you need any kind of formal qualifications to work as a carer in a nursing home in the UK or is my 2 years experience enough?

    I am also a British Citizen as my dad was born in England, so I don't need to worry about and Visa's or anything like that.
  3. 0
    YOu do not require any formal qualifications to work as a carer in the UK. Your 2 years should stand you in good stead
  4. 1
    Brilliant. Thank you very much!
    XB9S likes this.
  5. 0
    Hi sharrie! I have my NMC decision letter already and just waiting for my certificate of sponsorship. Can you describe the current work environment for NHS Nurses there in UK? I heard that the work load is too much that's why local nurses are going elsewhere (NZ, Canada, etc.) and NHS resort to recruit us - foreign nurses? And this is because of low budget given to NHS?? Are these true as what you can observe there in UK? thank you.
  6. 0
    Quote from aldreg21
    Hi sharrie! I have my NMC decision letter already and just waiting for my certificate of sponsorship. Can you describe the current work environment for NHS Nurses there in UK? I heard that the work load is too much that's why local nurses are going elsewhere (NZ, Canada, etc.) and NHS resort to recruit us - foreign nurses? And this is because of low budget given to NHS?? Are these true as what you can observe there in UK? thank you.
    I think it very much depends where you work, there are some areas where there is a great deal of money spent and resources are good, especially if you are helping to meet some of the government targets and there are some areas where resources are not good and everything seems to be a battle.

    There are many hospitals that have recruitment freezes and agency nurse bans which means much of the time you are working shorthanded and it's not easy. I'm not so sure that the NHS resorts to recruiting foreign nurses is true, we have many of our own nurses that are struggling to find work which is why trusts are only able to sponsor work permits of those nurses who work in shortage occupation areas.

    It's a tough life in the NHS, personally I love it and wouldn't want to work anywhere else, but there are days when I do wonder why I bother. Finances are difficult for managers, I know of a manager in a neighbouring trust recently who put a case in for more staff to be told that if you need to increase your numbers to manage the workload then you need to see which parts of the workload can be reduced, there is no money for new staff.
  7. 0
    I have a question regarding the minimum age of 17 years old (6 mos.) upon entering a nursing program required by the NMC to its applicants.

    I've searched their site and they said it's just a matter of compliance to the EU rules however I'm on denial and I'm just wondering if this rule is truly unbend-able. Had anyone managed to apply for registration and succeed who doesn't meet the said age limit?

    I have entered my BSN course at the age of 15 9/12 years old. Nevertheless, I managed to have the requirement of a 10 year education prior to having a nursing education...
  8. 0
    I don't think it's flexiable at all, although you would need to double check with the NMC. Most nursing students will be 18 on starting thier course
  9. 0
    Thank you for replying, sharrie.

    I tried to contact the NMC regarding this and is still waiting for a reply. ..and we thought studying early has it's advantages...

    I would just like to ask if this age thing is strict to UK citizens also. What about children who happen to skip a grade? Don't you have people who attended school at an early age too? Are they denied with college education? D:
  10. 0
    Quote from hazyblue
    Thank you for replying, sharrie.

    I tried to contact the NMC regarding this and is still waiting for a reply. ..and we thought studying early has it's advantages...

    I would just like to ask if this age thing is strict to UK citizens also. What about children who happen to skip a grade? Don't you have people who attended school at an early age too? Are they denied with college education? D:
    This criteria applies to citizens as well, I don't know of any nursing school that would take students under the minimum age.

    We don't tend to get moved up years in school, there are some students that will be allowed to take their GCSE and A levels early but they will be unlikely to be admitted to university until they are older

    This is an example of a university policy for accepting younger students, it's quite a bit of hassle so in general they don't do it

    http://www.kent.ac.uk/aps/informatio.../Appendix7.htm


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