Clinical hours short of NMC suggestion? - page 3

by helricha

33,669 Views | 123 Comments

First of all, I really hope Silverdragon reads this and gives me insight. I have sent out my application as well as all of my paperwork to the NMC for my nursing license, except my training form. I was trained in the US at... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from sarahaz
    Helricha,
    Congrats on getting your acceptance letter. I just saw your post and 100% understand what you have been going through as I received my acceptance letter about 2 weeks before you and started this process with the IELTS on June 19th.

    I was also concerned about the difference between credits vs hours and possibly not having enough, but apparently, its not as big of an issue as it leads you to believe. For the conversions, I ended up doing the entire thing myself and hand walking the form to each of the schools I attended and having someone in authority sign and seal it for me. Otherwise, NO ONE had a clue of what I was asking them to do except for the head of the program at NAU, who was an amazing person and was able to get a PDF file of the worksheet I designed for conversion and do everything else on her own.

    I will be starting my ONP course in Jan at Bournemouth. What are your plans for taking that course?

    Sarah
    Hey guys, just talked with my dean about everything and we came up with a total of 500 hours of didactic and 1100 hours for clinical time, although we are on a quarter-based system, not semester based.

    Sarah, would you mind posting how many hours you got with your conversion and whether it included all the pre-req's like microbio, a&p, etc?

    Helricha, was it your dean who decided not to include all the pre-req's or was it more rather the NMC asking you not to include them? We share a lot of classes at my university with other majors, i.e. when we took a psych growth and development class, we had to share it with psych majors even though the focus was more nurse based as the majority of the students were nursing majors. Same thing with A&P and microbio, etc etc. I would have many more hours with this counted in...

    Thanks again for everything you guys have posted; it's extraordinarily helpful!
  2. 0
    Hi helricha,

    I am a U.S. citizen training in an accelerated BSN program. I have about 9 months to go but I want to move to the UK to be with my significant other when I'm done. I found out I have to have 12 months experience here in the US first before I could work over in the UK, which I'm willing to do to be with him but now I'm concerned about the hours you mentioned the NMC requires. Since my program is an accelerated 18 mth program is does give me 1950 contact hours including didactic and experiential(clinical). Do you know if the NMC will count my pre-requisites like the micro and physio/anatomy?

    Also, do you or does anyone else know if an accelerated is disqualified from being considered an applicable Bachelor's of Nursing accepted by the NMC? I did over a year and a half of pre-req's plus this program is 18 mths and it's not online. Everything is in a classroom at a real school. I'm really concerned though as I just want to be able to be with my mate and work in the UK. I've considered getting a masters degree in nursing in the UK so I could apply for the student visa under Tier 4 but then I'm guessing I still wouldn't be able to work as a nurse there without the year of experience first.
    Does anyone know about this?! I really am starting to worry but I read previous stories like yours Helricha and maybe it could eventually work for me.
    Please, please, please help if you can!!! Thank you in advance!
  3. 0
    Quote from sweetiepiesteph410

    i've considered getting a masters degree in nursing in the uk so i could apply for the student visa under tier 4 but then i'm guessing i still wouldn't be able to work as a nurse there without the year of experience first.
    does anyone know about this?!
    that's an interesting idea. i'm an american graduate of a bsc (hons) in midwifery programme here after arriving as an rn with experience, so i had my nmc pin number. but the visa that follows the tier 4 student visa is the tier one post-study visa which i am now under, and it gives one a two year "free" period to find work without many restrictions (except for the requirement to switch over to a tier two visa within 6 months of its expiration). if you were a graduate of a uk nursing school, you wouldn't need any experience to get your pin number, naturally. so, if you graduate with a masters from a uk school, perhaps you also wouldn't need experience? better ask the nmc directly on this one, because they are strongly preoccupied with basic nursing education, rather than post-graduate. but, you never know.
  4. 0
    Quote from sweetiepiesteph410
    Hi helricha,

    I am a U.S. citizen training in an accelerated BSN program. I have about 9 months to go but I want to move to the UK to be with my significant other when I'm done. I found out I have to have 12 months experience here in the US first before I could work over in the UK, which I'm willing to do to be with him but now I'm concerned about the hours you mentioned the NMC requires. Since my program is an accelerated 18 mth program is does give me 1950 contact hours including didactic and experiential(clinical). Do you know if the NMC will count my pre-requisites like the micro and physio/anatomy?

    Also, do you or does anyone else know if an accelerated is disqualified from being considered an applicable Bachelor's of Nursing accepted by the NMC? I did over a year and a half of pre-req's plus this program is 18 mths and it's not online. Everything is in a classroom at a real school. I'm really concerned though as I just want to be able to be with my mate and work in the UK. I've considered getting a masters degree in nursing in the UK so I could apply for the student visa under Tier 4 but then I'm guessing I still wouldn't be able to work as a nurse there without the year of experience first.
    Does anyone know about this?! I really am starting to worry but I read previous stories like yours Helricha and maybe it could eventually work for me.
    Please, please, please help if you can!!! Thank you in advance!
    You really need to ask the NMC these questions because they may or may not accept accelerated programs. If they do not then working whilst doing your Masters may be hard because you will be required to be registered with the NMC and have a PIN. Not aware of any Masters courses in the UK being full time, the experience I have with Masters was part time but if the Masters requires clinical hours you may have issues if the NMC will not give you a PIN
  5. 0
    Quote from latterlife midwife
    that's an interesting idea. i'm an american graduate of a bsc (hons) in midwifery programme here after arriving as an rn with experience, so i had my nmc pin number. but the visa that follows the tier 4 student visa is the tier one post-study visa which i am now under, and it gives one a two year "free" period to find work without many restrictions (except for the requirement to switch over to a tier two visa within 6 months of its expiration). if you were a graduate of a uk nursing school, you wouldn't need any experience to get your pin number, naturally. so, if you graduate with a masters from a uk school, perhaps you also wouldn't need experience? better ask the nmc directly on this one, because they are strongly preoccupied with basic nursing education, rather than post-graduate. but, you never know.
    if your applying for a msc in a nursing course then i think you'll find most of them require you to have nmc registration first and in order to do this you would need the years experience first.

    here are a few examples

    http://www.city.ac.uk/study/courses/...rsing-msc.html

    entry requirements


    • registration as a nurse, normally with two years’ experience
    • if you want to take clinical modules you must be registered with the nursing and midwifery council and working within a healthcare setting
    • a second class honours degree
    • if you do not have a degree you will be considered, but may have to demonstrate an ability to study at degree level.

    for those students whose fi rst language is not english, one of the following is also required:

    • ielts: 7.0
    • toefl (internetbased): 107
    • pearson’s academic score: 72.
    • a fi rst degree from a uk university or an overseas institution recognised by the university as providing adequate evidence of profi ciency of the english language e.g. australia, canada or the usa.



    this one doesn't but it doesn't give any clinical contact within the course so wouldn't meet the nmc criteria
    http://www.nursing.manchester.ac.uk/...ode=08638&pg=3
  6. 0
    Unfortunately, I've read on other posts that accelerated BSNs are hard to get accepted by the NMC, if at all. See if you can call them up and get the skinny--although I do admit, they're not that helpful and basically read what's on the website and nothing else, in my own personal experience.
  7. 0
    thank you all for your quick replies!! i am definitely going to contact the nmc but i'm sure it's not going to be easy getting a quick answer. i am going to see my fiance in august so maybe i can try to make an appointment with them at the london office if i'm lucky, though i'm usually never lucky . a girl's gotta hope though!

    i'm guessing a lot of you are right that i do need that year of experience. i'm really afraid the accelerated bsn is gonna screw me over though getting acceptance. i had no other option here in the u.s. as the nursing programs here are so expensive cuz all the cheaper ones have years long waitlists. it's really a sad situation.

    i wonder if i got the year of nursing of here and then got married if i'd still have these problems but probably if they won't accept my education. i guess i could always do an mba, haha since i have a bachelor's in finance but business just wasn't something i was passionate about like nursing. maybe nursing administration? are there those kinds of positions available in the uk like in the us?

    oh one last question for latterlife midwife: you mentioned you were an american rn graduate who then went to the uk for a bsc in midwifery, how did you get nmc registration? did you already have a bsn with the required education elements the nmc wanted and then applied for your registration after your years of experience here in the us? also, how did you get accepted into the program? i've read on so many uk uni's sites that most bsc programs in nursing and midwifery aren't available to international students because they are funded by the nhs and we don't qualify for that until we settle permanently i thought. maybe you could help me understand that better as your situation could possibly be a route i take though midwifery isn't what i would specialize in, i'd like to do adult or geriatric clinical work eventually but right now i'm setting for anything in nursing over there to get to be with my fiance.
    thanks again everyone for all your time and help!!! will be emailing the nmc though soon and harassing them with skype phone calls till i get straight answers about my program though, haha.
  8. 0
    Oh as for the MSc I did find this one program at Liverpool John Moores University that claims it's for International students. It sounds perfect but there is no clinical experience given so does that mean it's basically a teaching degree for those who want to teach nursing? It'd be perfect in location and that it's full time. I've tried emailing the Uni for answers to my questions about how it all would work with the NMC but I've heard nothing in 2 weeks. Might give them another try. What do you UK nurses think about this program? Any thoughts/opinions are greatly appreciated!

    Entry requirements:

    Candidates will hold a professional nursing qualification
     Candidates should hold a degree from a government approved university.
     The International English Language Testing System (IELTS) minimum 6.5 overall band or score equivalent, or evidence of having completed secondary or tertiary education through the medium of English.
     Two references, one of which should be an academic reference.

    Mode of Study
    The mode of study is full-time over a minimum of 1 calendar year and a maximum of 3 years. Taught modules will be completed within one academic year.

    This programme will provide registered nurses with enhanced skills in theoretical principles of nursing, research, teaching and leadership. The programme has been developed specifically to meet the needs of international students and students who may be interested in international perspectives in healthcare, taking into account their academic level at the point of entry, and endeavours to meet their educational and professional aspirations.

    Aim of the course
    The programme aims to provide a theoretical perspective for post-registration nursing education, which meets the requirements for the award of Master of Science from Liverpool John Moores University.
    Taken from: http://www.ljmu.ac.uk/MKG_Global_Doc...ernational.pdf
  9. 0
    It looks like a reasonable nursing masters degree but the NMC would still need you to meet the basic nurse training and experience to register and this masters wouldnt give you that.
  10. 0
    New to this forum and hope someone will have an insight.

    I am an American trained nurse (with the dreaded accelerated second degree BSN) who is residing in the UK with a spousal visa. I started the NMC application process, but called today to question the clinical hours requirement. They told me straight -- that with a 12 month BSN, they will be unable to approve my application. As I'm not running off to the U.S. so quickly and I'd like to work as a nurse in the U.K., they referred me to the UCAS site, specifically the section on APEL credits. The NMC suggested contacting university programs here to see what I could do to amalgamate my US BSN.

    Questions:

    1) Has anyone done this? Suggestions?
    2) Not to sound too complainy, but I'm unsure of one detail. The dean of my university in the U.S. explained that the clinical and theory hours are exactly the same in the accelerated program as they are in the traditional BSN. So, does that mean that if I had a traditional American BSN, I would still have difficulty joining the UK register?

    Any insight would be appreciated. I was working under the assumption when I agreed to move here with my husband that having a BSN would exempt me from this mini-nightmare. I had no idea they differentiated between a traditional BSN and an accelerated BSN.

    Help!


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