Band 5 to band 7 - how long??

  1. Hi everyone

    Just curious, I am wondering what your experience of promotion within the NHS has been like post qualification? I qualified October 2010 and I have been a band 6 nurse for one year now. A really good band 7 job has come up in my trust which I have applied for. What are my chances of selection for interview? Or getting the job?
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  2. Visit ireallycare profile page

    About ireallycare

    Joined: May '13; Posts: 5

    10 Comments

  3. by   XB9S
    It would depend on the job and what experience you have gained. Personally I wonder if just 1 year at band is enough, I all for at least 4 years as 6 for my band 7 posts, both manager and advanced practice posts.
  4. by   ireallycare
    one years experience as a band 6 or one year experience at any level? a few of my colleagues have said that I will not even be considered for interview for a band 7 post as I have only been qualified a few years. This is my dream job though so I am hopeful. I guess what I am really wondering is how long are people usually qualified before they become band 7 and band 8 nurses. The many band 7 and band 8 nurses that I have met have been qualified for over a decade. I am not sure that experience always counts for alot though.
  5. by   XB9S
    Quote from ireallycare
    one years experience as a band 6 or one year experience at any level? a few of my colleagues have said that I will not even be considered for interview for a band 7 post as I have only been qualified a few years. This is my dream job though so I am hopeful. I guess what I am really wondering is how long are people usually qualified before they become band 7 and band 8 nurses. The many band 7 and band 8 nurses that I have met have been qualified for over a decade. I am not sure that experience always counts for alot though.


    A practical answer to your question, for a band 6 staff nurse , I ask for at least 2 years at band 5 in that speciality with evidence of professional development , for a band 7 at least 4 years at band 6 with a MSc / MA or studying towards with a relevant qualification in the specialty

    Some personal, friendly advice you have only been qualified 3 years, your still just learning the basics of being a qualified nurse, my advice, consolidate your experience, learn your speciality, learn from the experience you don't appear to value. As a matron who recruits to senior positions, I wouldn't shortlist a nurse with your inexperience

    Experience counts for a great deal, with experience comes maturity and respect, how to deal with challenges and how to communicate with dignity and respect. Just reading your post above, these would appear to be skills you would benefit from acquiring.
  6. by   nelfid
    I may have entered this conversation rather late in the day, but frankly I find your response XB9S, particularly your final sentence, to be a demonstration of how increased experience does not, as you put it, equate to an increased ability to communicate with dignity, respect or maturity. 'Ireallycare' asked a question 'out of curiosity' and you replied in quite an offensive fashion. It is ironic that you think people could learn from this and how this proves your point. What it seems to show is that the further you are to the top, the more you look down on those 'beneath' you (in terms of banding at least). I have worked with nurses from bands 5, 6 and 7 with years of experience and it is quite clear that many don't know how to communicate with patients and are a liability. A band 6 nurse with one years experience, who works with dignity, respect and maturity is worth more to a team than a band 8 who struggles in this area. You should not need a band 5 to tell you all of this.
  7. by   K+MgSO4
    Nelfid,
    I find this an interesting post to make as your first post on allnurses. The general guidance when joining an online form is to observe and poke about a bit before posting, especially a controversial post to a highly respected poster such as XB9S. Also as a NUM the advice that was given was spot on. Tone and inflection are missing in online posts and learning how to interpret the comment is a skill you need to develop.
    This post was 5 years old, I am not even sure if the OP has come back since. It is poor online forum etiquette to dreg up posts.
    Also what was posted was advice. The OP can choose to take it, ignore it or take part of it.

    This is not meant to push you out of Allnurses but to guide you to being a member who is supported by the community.
  8. by   GrumpyRN
    nelfid,

    This post is 5 years old, from reading your reply you seem to be a Band 5 and, with all due respect, you do not know what you are talking about.

    XB9S politely gave a reply with good advice. I would be concerned about any Band 5 gaining a Band 6 post after 2 years. They are still learning the job. To then try to get a Band 7 post after 1 year would make me very reluctant to even work with this person. They have neither the experience or knowledge to work at a Band 7 level. I would be wondering why they got the post - what has transpired in backrooms etc.

    Dignity, respect and maturity are also worth more when applied to strangers on an internet forum who have been communicating with each other for several years .

    May I echo K+MgSO4 and welcome you to Allnurses which is a supportive community where you can find all sorts of useful advice and information.
  9. by   nelfid
    "....with all due respect, you do not know what you are talking about".

    Your comment just supports what I wrote. I can't really understand how you feel that this builds rapport. You would not talk to a patient or someone in the street like that because it's unnecessarily abrasive. I have no argument whatsoever against refusing to employ an individual at higher band who has limited experience. Incidentally, many Trusts are now employing graduates on 18-24 month programmes at the end of which they are promoted to band 6 positions.
  10. by   nelfid
    I responded to the above post as I was researching the same question. It is the first page that I saw on this website and was not impressed. Nurses use various mediums of communications in their work, including emails, and should be mindful of how they are viewed and interpreted. I have used the internet for long enough to know when comments are unnecessarily harsh. Responding to a simple query with 'you would benefit from acquiring maturity, respect and an ability to communicate with dignity and respect' is condescending and doesn't encourage people to engage in forums. Perhaps that's why 'ireallycare' didn't respond.

    The advice in the first two paragraphs I have no issue with.
  11. by   GrumpyRN
    Quote from nelfid
    "....with all due respect, you do not know what you are talking about".

    Your comment just supports what I wrote. I can't really understand how you feel that this builds rapport. You would not talk to a patient or someone in the street like that because it's unnecessarily abrasive.
    Not true, I do say this to patients and colleagues because occasionally it needs said.


    Quote from nelfid
    I have no argument whatsoever against refusing to employ an individual at higher band who has limited experience.
    Well, which is it? Refuse to employ someone with limited experience or, "I have worked with nurses from bands 5, 6 and 7 with years of experience and it is quite clear that many don't know how to communicate with patients and are a liability".


    Quote from nelfid
    Incidentally, many Trusts are now employing graduates on 18-24 month programmes at the end of which they are promoted to band 6 positions.
    Does not make it right.


    I was initially going to go with Dunning-Kruger but feel Aristotle is a better quote (and less "abrasive")
    "The more you know, the more you know you don't know."

    Please remember that I have been doing this for 35 years, I have seen all the different management methods - I even have a management qualification - and also all the different nurse training methods. Nothing beats experience and knowledge.
  12. by   XB9S
    Awww shucks K+MgS04 and Grumpy thanks for you support.

    Nelfid, sorry you find my post harsh. I really do try to be measured and helpful in my responses but really don't believe in "buttering" people up and giving poor advice. I've re-read and can see why you may view it as harsh but although in hindsight I may alter the wording I'm would stand by the message.

    I have watched too many colleagues take on senior posts before they had the experience to support that position, and tried to support failing nurses who have tried to take on higher grades before they truly know their craft.

    One of the best bits of advice I was given was don't chase the grade too soon. Work, learn, develop and stretch yourself within your current job and when you feel you have moved from novice to expert then consider more seniority.
    Last edit by XB9S on 1:13 pm : Reason: Adding

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