Am i fully to blame for this or did my mentor act complacement. - pg.7 | allnurses

Am i fully to blame for this or did my mentor act complacement. - page 7

I would be so grateful for anyone who answers this, because making me very stressed. On my last placement in a childrens hospital, i made a medication error. The child takes two meds both of... Read More

  1. Visit  inthedistrict profile page
    0
    Very glad to hear you are going to go talk to the university. PLEASE do so. Even if it means you finish a semester later, or something like that...you need to get your feet under you and get a firmer foundation. Please also let this make you very aware of your limits. If you are feeling stressed, rushed, etc, STOP, and go get a faculty member. IF there is the least bit of doubt, go get a faculty member. If you feel you need more supervision, ask for it. If this is a problem for your school, that is a problem WITH the school. No shame in not being perfect-- think of how much more UNperfect you'd be if you made a med error that had serious adverse effects. It's knowing what needs to be perfect and what doesn't that makes a good nurse. It would be nice to make sure every pt. has ice as soon as they ask, but I'd rather fail in that and make sure no one gets hurt.

    I'm sorry you were so upset by this board, because being upset makes people defensive and myopic. I hope that knowing you have support and understanding gives you the courage to do what is right here, and get yourself the help you need! That is hard, but not as hard as what could happen if you don't.

    Quick addendum-- just because we see your point about not having someone pick up that you were unsafe doesn't mean I'd go in to the university guns blazing and blame him. I wouldn't actually mention your instructor at all. At the end of the day, the problem is deeper than your instructor, and that's the level you need to fix.

    Good luck as you take the steps to fix this problem. It is brave of you to do and important!
  2. Visit  nursecat64 profile page
    1
    Tinkerbell, I couldn't sleep. I knew you would see the words "poorly" and not being American and be defensive after I had posted. So came back to clarify. I was not trying to be critical. I was trying to find out if you were in a different sort of program than we have here. It sounded like your program of study is different. Different teaching methods. Perhaps you don't draw up the meds yourself but are given a tray of already filled meds to pass? I shouldn't have said worded "poorly" I should have said inconsistent. (yellow med ,mouth stuff, nystatin) I thought maybe you spoke French or Spanish or Chinese or...and learned English later, and were trying to find different words to articulate what you meant,.. I was trying to DEFEND you! If I upset you more, I'm very sorry. But a nurse needs to grow a thick skin. We get yelled at, by doctors, by patients, sometimes bosses, whether we deserve it or not. As my instructor always told us "put on your emotional rain coat, and let it slide off" The comments here on AN are not to attack you as a PERSON, but to help you look at what happened objectively, from a nursing perspective.
    Last edit by nursecat64 on Jan 29, '12 : Reason: wording
    KelRN215 likes this.
  3. Visit  Altra profile page
    0
    [QUOTE=tinkerbell419;6099701]I dont want to talk about this anymore, i was crying yesterday reading the comments, and deep down i am a good student nurse, i am very caring towards everyone and ive never made a mistake so far on my course.[QUOTE=tinkerbell419;6099701]

    This is the most disturbing thing -- that we have patiently explained to you the major, multiple areas that need addressed -- and you continue to identify yourself as "a good student nurse". Compassion alone does not make you a good student. You could have killed someone, easily, with the poor thought processes you have demonstrated in this scenario.

    I will try to draw a comparison: I cannot sing well to save my life. I read music and play 2 musical instruments. I like to sing - I sing in the shower, while doing household chores, and while driving. But the sound would make you cringe, trust me. For whatever reason, I am simply not endowed with the genetic material to produce a quality singing voice. And while I can imagine myself as Aretha Franklin while I'm running my vacuum or driving down the highway ... wishing does not make it so.

    Having the desire to do something well does not equal having the aptitude, preparation, or skill to do it.


    Quote from tinkerbell419
    1 have learnt a valuable lesson, and i did know those medications.

    The mistake was that i should have done more homework on those medications, read up on their pharmacological values to know EXACTLY what im working with.

    So that is a lesson learnt and something else i can put into my developmental plan.
    I don't see evidence of having learned a lesson, because you still can't seem to identify whether or not you knew what meds you were giving, for what purpose, in what dosage, and by what route.
  4. Visit  nursecat64 profile page
    0
    Do they teach the 5 rights of medication administration in your school?
  5. Visit  Sparrowhawk profile page
    1
    I think its a fake now.
    CapeCodMermaid likes this.
  6. Visit  abiklags profile page
    0
    Quote from nursecat64
    Do they teach the 5 rights of medication administration in your school?
    we did this at least 2 times in the med room alone, plus one time at the computer prior and then one more time in the pts room. in pediatrics i always asked my prof what med she was handing me. especially if i knew the pt had an order for amoxacillin. i'm allergic to amox so i was extra careful handling those doses.
    to tell you the truth, i'd be scared if one of my classmates told me they did such a mistake and then say well the CI didnt tell me which drug is which. its the students job to do her work and not assume anything. the clinical experience is to learn. so ask questions. yes, you are allowed to question your CI. the worst (BEST) thing that can happen is you will learn.

    and i have to agree, something is off. first you say the yellow medicine. who identifies medicine by the color? even tylenol can be pink one day and then purple the next. motrin can be orange then pink. color means nothing. zilch. zero. nada.

    if you really are a nursing student, i think you need to redo a class or certain topics before you can be allowed back on the floor with pts.

    good luck to you
  7. Visit  Meriwhen profile page
    0
    Quote from Sparrowhawk
    I think its a fake now.
    I'm not sure because the OP seems very invested in this thread. Usually trolls post a few times and move on.

    Though if the OP is real, the knowledge deficit they're showing regarding medications is very frightening.
  8. Visit  psu_213 profile page
    0
    There are some people on here who over and over again try and point out how nursing and healthcare are much better in England/Britain. If this how "good" nursing students are trained on that side of pond, then I hope I am never a patient over there.

    Also, in England, do they capitalize a lone "I" and use apostrophes in contractions?
  9. Visit  Sparrowhawk profile page
    0
    Yeah...I know a lot of British and European folk....they type correctly. It's not that...something's just not right here, brah. And another thing, even on an Iphone one *can* type correctly, my girl does it all the time....so. *hijackingthread*
  10. Visit  wooh profile page
    7
    Quote from psu_213
    There are some people on here who over and over again try and point out how nursing and healthcare are much better in England/Britain. If this how "good" nursing students are trained on that side of pond, then I hope I am never a patient over there.
    If we judged entire healthcare systems based on a few AN posts, I'd have to say the U.S. system is going to lose.
    sapphire18, XB9S, KelRN215, and 4 others like this.
  11. Visit  XB9S profile page
    0
    Quote from psu_213
    There are some people on here who over and over again try and point out how nursing and healthcare are much better in England/Britain. If this how "good" nursing students are trained on that side of pond, then I hope I am never a patient over there.

    Also, in England, do they capitalize a lone "I" and use apostrophes in contractions?

    Ok now I am going to jump in, please don't judge a system you know little about.


    To the OP if your a student in the UK (I am guessing so since you mention the BNF) what on earth were you doing giving medications unsupervised, this is NOT allowed. In which case yes your mentor is absolutely responsible as he should have been monitoring your practice and administration. That said, you will also know your limitations and should have refused, so you are also accountable by your act

    Can I suggest you visit the NMC website and look at the code, standards for administration of medicines and then read through some of the conduct hearings.
  12. Visit  XB9S profile page
    0
    Here are some links for you

    Guidance for students | Nursing and Midwifery Council

    Standards | Nursing and Midwifery Council

    You'll find the standards for medicines management in that link.

    Hearings | Nursing and Midwifery Council
  13. Visit  XB9S profile page
    1
    I've moved this to the UK forum as I believe your a UK student so will get more appropriate responses here.

    If this is not the case let me know and I'll pop it back
    Silverdragon102 likes this.

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