standard precautions vs. universal precautions? | allnurses

standard precautions vs. universal precautions?

  1. 0 can someone please tell me what the difference between these two is? in my foundations of nursing textbook it says "UP are techniques to be used with all clients to decrease the risk of transmitting unidentified pathogens." then for SP it goes on to say "these are precautions used in the care of all hospitalized persons regardless of their diagnosis or possible infection status."

    i take it that UP means gloving up/gowning up/masking up whenever any body fluids may be encountered, regardless of the pt's isolation status. but isn't that what SP is?

    thanks,
    hbgwan
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. Visit  tablefor9 profile page
    #1 4
    Universal Precautions and Standard Precautions are the same thing. It's just a terminology shift that came about several years ago.
  4. Visit  NurseLoveJoy88 profile page
    #2 1
    Correct me im wrong but for SP/UP you dont have to mask or gown up all the time when handling bodily fluids you just have to wear gloves.
    And ofcourse each situation is different. Look at like this... you are not going to wear a mask and gown, to toilet someone, you will only need gloves.
  5. Visit  classicdame profile page
    #3 1
    standard precautions pertain to whatever is the risk - standard for resp issue is a mask, standard for contact is gloves, etc.

    Universal precautions means you are aware that EVERYONE has the potential to be infectious. In knowing that, you must decide what is the standard precaution to protect me in THIS instance? Gloves are never wrong.
  6. Visit  hbgwan profile page
    #4 0
    thanks to all!
  7. Visit  MsGelai profile page
    #5 2
    Quote from NurseLoveJoy88
    Correct me im wrong but for SP/UP you dont have to mask or gown up all the time when handling bodily fluids you just have to wear gloves.
    And ofcourse each situation is different. Look at like this... you are not going to wear a mask and gown, to toilet someone, you will only need gloves.
    According to Centers for Disease Control, STANDARD PRECAUTION is the outgrowth of UNIVERSAL PRECAUTION (UP). Universal Precaution was first introduced on 1987 to prevent the spread or the transmission of blood borne pathogens to the health care providers. However, on 1996 the concept of STANDARD PRECAUTION (SP) was established to expand the course of UP. STANDARD PRECAUTION now constitutes the primary strategy to prevent the transmission of infectious agents not only to the health care personnel but also to patients and hospital visitors.

    Hence, gowning, wearing of mask, gloving, and the use of protective barriers are just components of the popular Standard Precaution.

    I hope this helps. For more info and updates, please visit Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  8. Visit  MsGelai profile page
    #6 0
    Quote from hbgwan
    can someone please tell me what the difference between these two is? in my foundations of nursing textbook it says "UP are techniques to be used with all clients to decrease the risk of transmitting unidentified pathogens." then for SP it goes on to say "these are precautions used in the care of all hospitalized persons regardless of their diagnosis or possible infection status."

    i take it that UP means gloving up/gowning up/masking up whenever any body fluids may be encountered, regardless of the pt's isolation status. but isn't that what SP is?

    thanks,
    hbgwan

    According to Centers for Disease Control, STANDARD PRECAUTION is the outgrowth of UNIVERSAL PRECAUTION (UP). Universal Precaution was first introduced on 1987 to prevent the spread or the transmission of blood borne pathogens to the health care providers. However, on 1996 the concept of STANDARD PRECAUTION (SP) was established to expand the course of UP. STANDARD PRECAUTION now constitutes the primary strategy to prevent the transmission of infectious agents not only to the health care personnel but also to patients and hospital visitors.

    Hence, gowning, wearing of mask, gloving, and the use of protective barriers are just components of the popular Standard Precaution.

    I hope this helps. For more info and updates, please visit Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  9. Visit  Ners Gabcer profile page
    #7 0
    @MsGelai
    Could u give me the real example of UP??
    Because u only gave the sample of SP... thanks
  10. Visit  Jenni811 profile page
    #8 0
    arent they the same thing??? It basically just means to treat everyone as if they were infected with a pathogen.

    For example...Treat all patients as if they were infected with HIV such as gloves when handling blood products, not reusing needles etc. another example...treat all patients as if they might be infected with MRSA, wash hands before and after contact. Not necessarily gowning and gloving every time you enter the room, but you get it.
  11. Visit  cherryblossom13 profile page
    #9 0
    III.A. Standard Precautions Standard Precautions combine the major features of Universal Precautions (UP) and Body Substance Isolation (BSI) and are based on the principle that all blood, body fluids, secretions, excretions except sweat, nonintact skin, and mucous membranes may contain transmissible infectious agents. Standard Precautions include a group of infection prevention practices that apply to all patients, regardless of suspected or confirmed infection status, in any setting in which healthcare is delivered (Table 4). These include: hand hygiene; use of gloves, gown, mask, eye protection, or face shield, depending on the anticipated exposure; and safe injection practices. Also, equipment or items in the patient environment likely to have been contaminated with infectious body fluids must be handled in a manner to prevent transmission of infectious agents (e.g. wear gloves for direct contact, contain heavily soiled equipment, properly clean and disinfect or sterilize reusable equipment before use on another patient). The application of Standard Precautions during patient care is determined by the nature of the HCW-patient interaction and the extent of anticipated blood, body fluid, or pathogen exposure. For some interactions (e.g., performing venipuncture), only gloves may be needed; during other interactions (e.g., intubation), use of gloves, gown, and face shield or mask and goggles is necessary. Education and training on the principles and rationale for recommended practices are critical elements of Standard Precautions because they facilitate appropriate decision-making and promote adherence when HCWs are faced with new circumstances.

    -quoted from CDC.. 2007 Guideline for Isolation Precautions: Preventing Transmission of Infectious Agents in Healthcare Settings
  12. Visit  nurseprnRN profile page
    #10 1
    "could u give me the real example of up??
    because u only gave the sample of sp... thanks "

    umm, if you read the thread instead of only looking for your homework answer, you'll pick up the idea that they are the same thing.

    since the op said she read these two terminologies in a textbook, i think what happened is that the editor did not pick up that two different chapter or section authors used inconsistent terminology. happens more often than you might think .
    good pick up, but wrong conclusion: the degree of ppe (personal protection equipment) in any given case depends on the potential for exposure to body substances. we don't gown and glove and mask for everyone :d.
  13. Visit  NCRNMDM profile page
    #11 1
    They are the same thing. At the places I've worked, the only thing standard precations entailed was wearing gloves when in contact with body fluid, washing hands between patients, using hand sanitizer, etc. When you start talking about wearing a mask, gown, or goggles you are getting into specific precautions, like droplet, contact, etc. Standard means that it is the standard and what you would do with every patient. There's nothing special about it.
  14. Visit  BickUW89 profile page
    #12 0
    The difference is this:

    "Universal Precautions" is an OSHA term, defined in OSHA's Bloodborne Pathogen Standard. It refers specifically to "blood and other potentially infectious materials," or "OPIM." Note that OPIM DOES NOT include certain body fluids/substances, such as vomit, urine, feces, sweat, salive, tears, et. al., UNLESS they are contaminated with visible blood.

    "Standard Precautions" is a term adopted by the CDC. It takes the idea of OSHA's Universal Precautions but expands it to include, basically, everything. As some say, "it it's wet and it ain't yours, don't touch it."

    The most important difference between the two is this: OSHA is a regulatory agency, and thus those things defined by Universal Precautions are ENFORCEABLE as regulations. the CDC, however, is not a regulatory agency. The CDC issues GUIDELINES, not REGULATIONS. Guidelines are not enforceable in the same manner that Regulations are.

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