"Risk for" nursing dx vs actual

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    Does anyone know why "Risk for Electrolyte Imbalance" is a valid nursing diagnosis, but an actual "Electrolyte Imbalance" is not? The same applies to Risk for Infection vs. an actual Infection, and I am sure there are others. This is frustrating to me because I am working on a care plan for a patient who has electrolyte imbalances, not just a risk for them (due to kidney failure). If you have any insight, please let me know.
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

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    I believe it is because Electrolyte Imbalance and Infection are both medical diagnoses.
  5. 0
    Quote from cjar107013
    I believe it is because Electrolyte Imbalance and Infection are both medical diagnoses.
    I believe she/he is right as well.
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    yep, thats how my instructor made it sound. I'm under the impression you can still use the "risk for" even though they actually have it, but I could be wrong.
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    I agree with the above posters that "electrolyte imbalance" and "infection" are medical diagnoses.

    Quote from afox
    yep, thats how my instructor made it sound. I'm under the impression you can still use the "risk for" even though they actually have it, but I could be wrong.
    Our teachers don't allow us to use that. If they have it, they have it and you can't use "risk for."
    I think you could use "Risk for nutritional deficit lower than body requirements r/t electrolyte imbalance secondary to.....xyz" If they have a specific electrolyte that is above/below the normal range you could focus on what the ND might be r/t that particular deficit.
    Clear as mud?

    m
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    Great question! If the reasoning is that infection and electrolyte imbalance are medical dx, then wouldn't any "Risk for (any medical diagnosis)" be alright?
  9. 0
    Quote from jjjoy
    Great question! If the reasoning is that infection and electrolyte imbalance are medical dx, then wouldn't any "Risk for (any medical diagnosis)" be alright?
    Exactly! It's also my understanding that none of the NANDA nursing diagnoses can even use medical diagnoses in them, which means that electrolyte imbalance or infection can't be true medical diagnoses.


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