Retirement in the nursing field. - page 5

by A.B.123

10,656 Visits | 92 Comments

There is an issue going on at health care facilities about nurses who are still working as nurses well into their 60's and 70's. Assuming everyone ages differently, consider the effects of aging (such as decrease in vision,... Read More


  1. 1
    Canada eliminated mandatory retirement in the 1980s. In theory, you can work 'till you drop.

    Nurses up here are unionized and most contracts give you the option to retire with a full pension when your age added to years of service equal 85 or some other determined number. Most take the money and run.

    Several took the money and returned to work. So there they are collecting a pension and around $450 a shift. In my hospital there is one RN still working. She's over 75, collects her nurses pension, her government pension and works part time. She's deaf, cranky, stiff, slow moving, and patients have complained about her care. Until she codes on the job or makes a huge mistake, her union is protecting her right to work.

    Somewhere there has to be a line drawn in the sand.
    joanna73 likes this.
  2. 1
    I've never seen any older nurses "running circles around the younger ones." The only people who say that are the old nurses who should have retired 10 years ago.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  3. 11
    Quote from rnlily
    I've never seen any older nurses "running circles around the younger ones." The only people who say that are the old nurses who should have retired 10 years ago.
    Ha, I'm calling b.s. on that.

    It all depends on the individual nurses.
    HazelLPN, SoldierNurse22, weesyanne, and 8 others like this.
  4. 3
    Quote from GrnTea

    ...Good ta see ya around again, Rubes.

    THIS!
    GrnTea, Esme12, and Altra like this.
  5. 4
    Quote from rnlily
    I've never seen any older nurses "running circles around the younger ones." The only people who say that are the old nurses who should have retired 10 years ago.

    You should see where I work then. Several of the RNs are 20+ years in the emergency dept and make the younger ones look BAD. Even more than that, two of those experienced nurses also work on ambulances when they are not on duty in the hospital! They are goddess nurses that I want to be like someday!
    HazelLPN, SoldierNurse22, joanna73, and 1 other like this.
  6. 6
    Quote from rnlily
    I've never seen any older nurses "running circles around the younger ones." The only people who say that are the old nurses who should have retired 10 years ago.
    Well, I have.
    HazelLPN, SoldierNurse22, weesyanne, and 3 others like this.
  7. 7
    That phrase makes me laugh. Any nurse running around in circles needs a psych eval.
    KelRN215, SoldierNurse22, mds1, and 4 others like this.
  8. 6
    Quote from NurseOnAMotorcycle
    You should see where I work then. Several of the RNs are 20+ years in the emergency dept and make the younger ones look BAD. Even more than that, two of those experienced nurses also work on ambulances when they are not on duty in the hospital! They are goddess nurses that I want to be like someday!
    Obviously you need to retire....
    Quote from roser13
    Well, I have.
    As should you.

    Retire NOW! Before your bad eyesight makes you miss the computer telling you that your patient is crumping!!!!!
    SoldierNurse22, GrnTea, joanna73, and 3 others like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from Mulan
    Not according to this:



    Retirement Age Calculator
    You are correct -- my error was that it incrementally increased beyond the traditional age of 65 years 0 months ... for those born in 1938 ... and is age 67 years 0 months for those born in 1959 or later.
  10. 5
    Here's a thought:

    Let's supposed that the deficiencies of age do in fact render a nurse inadequate, UNDER THE CURRENT MODEL OF PRACTICE. Perhaps, then, the solution is to institute a system of apprenticeship wherein the senior nurses have their juniors perform the manual labor of nursing whilst the master nurse plans and directs the care through the day.

    Rather than taking the freshly minted BSN and putting them onto the floor, they instead would spend the next 3 years as a minimally-paid apprentice for the master nurse. I'd have my own 4 patients as well as my A-1, A-2, and A-3 to handle physical labor and other tasks as assigned.

    After graduation from the apprenticeship, the nurse would then spend the next 20 years or so in solo practice whilst attaining 'master' status and the minimum required age to take on an apprentice.

    I say this partly tongue-in-cheek, and because I don't mind doing people's homework for them, but am also pointing out that there are a great many accommodations that could be made to enable nurses to work longer than they might presently be able to.

    I also don't particularly care for the idea that people might be forced into 'retirement' when same might be tantamount to forcing poverty upon them.

    Instead, I'd prefer to see changes to the system which enable MORE gray-hairs to keep earning money rather than trying to force them out.
    rn/writer, GrnTea, joanna73, and 2 others like this.


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