Retirement in the nursing field. - page 3

by A.B.123 11,755 Views | 92 Comments

There is an issue going on at health care facilities about nurses who are still working as nurses well into their 60's and 70's. Assuming everyone ages differently, consider the effects of aging (such as decrease in vision,... Read More


  1. 16
    Quote from Esme12
    Not very veiled....I think it's homework
    If it IS homework, I'd be very curious as to the context of the assignment....

    "Now class, let's discuss the ongoing issue of the old bags who refuse to die. Should they be euthanized?"
    Last edit by roser13 on Feb 12, '13
    GrnTea, Bubbles, silverbat, and 13 others like this.
  2. 13
    Quote from roser13
    Welcome to AN.com! You sure picked a great subject for your first post
    This is SOOOO homework. Students just do not get that we can sniff those out a mile away, mostly because no student writes like that. This is a faculty-composed bit o' work. Except for the "ect.," which means "electroconvulsive therapy," which is what I need after seeing it so often.

    Note to OP: Asking a lot of anonymous people on an internet message board for opinions does not constitute "research," and your faculty will SOOOO not appreciate it when they find out that's what you did on this.

    Hints: Library. Nursing periodicals. Information on aging in other professions.
    rn/writer, OCNRN63, imintrouble, and 10 others like this.
  3. 24
    I think the mandatory retirement age for nurses should be 50 since that is the age I am currently.

    And their retirement pension should be funded by the the young nurses just starting out.

    Get it done ASAP please OP.
    Here.I.Stand, Ruby Vee, HazelLPN, and 21 others like this.
  4. 0
    @Mom To 4. Maybe her age was a factor, but the acuity in nursing has increased so much in the past 10 years, that some have a hard time to follow. She probably wanted to change career until she had a decent retirement package but wasn't able to because of her age, no one would give her chance. Also, mentioning her age is not fair. Many a time, floors are too busy regarding acuity and nurse-patients ratio but administration disregards this fact. Nurses get burned out and patient-care suffers. She should have been allowed to move on to a less active role but again...The main fact that all need to keep in mind is that with the shortage of nursing that we have, young or old nurses, whether it's by age or experience are needed and certainly should be evaluated because of what they do on the floor not their age.
  5. 0
    OP, your instructors are members of allnurses, and they will always deny it if you ask them. Look how long this thread is??? I think you are gonna get found out.
  6. 1
    If the OP was tryin to discuss the topic he or she would have commented by now. It is homework, I also agree that the way it is worded doesn't not sound natural. It was written by a professor.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from Esme12
    So....you believe that the nurse not going on the computer and seeing an alert caused the patient to get sepsis?

    That just isn't the case. Not seeing a form did not cause that patients sepsis. I agree that age doesn't assure competence...nor does years in the profession guarantee competence.

    If hospitals had real pension plans you might find more nurses willing to retire. With the bad economy they can't retire. I have 34 years in the profession. I have been a nurse since I was 18 years old. I am computer literate and have extensive experience. If you are not in my age bracket it is easy to say make them retire......but there are many nurses like me who maybe over 50 but have teenagers.

    Agesim exists in nursing already it just isn't talked about.
    I'm not saying that the nurse caused sepsis. I'm saying the nurse didn't see the alert and transfer the patient to the appropriate level of care as she should of, and as it should have happened.
  8. 4
    Quote from A.B.123
    There is an issue going on at health care facilities about nurses who are still working as nurses well into their 60's and 70's. Assuming everyone ages differently, consider the effects of aging (such as decrease in vision, hearing, unsteady gait, ect.) do you think they put their patients and themselves at risk for injury? If so do you think there should be a mandatory retirement age for nurses?
    Where do you see this "issue"? When I worked in the hospital, out of a staff of about 50 we had TWO- count 'em, TWO, nurses who were over the age of 50. They were both incredible nurses... maybe slower on the computer than the rest of us and one of them would get more bent out of shape than the younger nurses when they made changes to the computer charting system, but one's ability to quickly use the computer does not affect one's ability to assess a patient.

    Now, I am 28 about to be 29 years old on Friday and I have many of the issues you address here... my visual acuity is good but I am 25% peripherally blind secondary to temporal lobe surgery at the age of 19... my left side is weaker than my right which becomes noticeable after stress/exertion so when that's the case, my gait isn't as steady as it normally is. I, however, do my job just fine as these are chronic problems that I deal with every.single.day.

    The decrease in vision that comes with age is generally something that requires reading glasses. Young people can be far-sighted as well... should anyone who needs glasses not be allowed to enter the nursing profession? Same with hearing problems... there are any number of reasons why someone could have hearing loss... should someone who had cancer as a child and received ototoxic drugs not be allowed to work as a nurse because of their hearing deficit?

    A blanket age for retirement is foolish is any profession. The Chief of Neurosurgery at my former hospital is easily in his early 70s... he recently stepped down from being Department Head but continues to operate. I would trust him to operate on me any day. My own neuro-ophthalmologist is 79! It takes him a long time to type a note and he types with 2 fingers but I've yet to see how that affects his ability to test my vision.
    OCNRN63, loriangel14, netglow, and 1 other like this.
  9. 20
    Quote from whitecat5000
    I'm not saying that the nurse caused sepsis. I'm saying the nurse didn't see the alert and transfer the patient to the appropriate level of care as she should of, and as it should have happened.
    If we need computer alerts to tell us that a patient is going South, we've got much bigger problems in nursing than senior staff members.
    Here.I.Stand, Ruby Vee, heron, and 17 others like this.
  10. 8
    Quote from CrunchRN
    I think the mandatory retirement age for nurses should be 50 since that is the age I am currently.

    And their retirement pension should be funded by the the young nurses just starting out.

    Get it done ASAP please OP.
    I need reading glasses already. Makes me a danger to patients. Let's drop that age to 38 to protect the patients from my aging eyes.


    Quote from whitecat5000
    I'm not saying that the nurse caused sepsis. I'm saying the nurse didn't see the alert and transfer the patient to the appropriate level of care as she should of, and as it should have happened.
    Said before I could:

    Quote from KelRN215
    If we need computer alerts to tell us that a patient is going South, we've got much bigger problems in nursing than senior staff members.
    Here.I.Stand, OCNRN63, GrnTea, and 5 others like this.


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