Retirement in the nursing field. - page 2

by A.B.123

10,660 Visits | 92 Comments

There is an issue going on at health care facilities about nurses who are still working as nurses well into their 60's and 70's. Assuming everyone ages differently, consider the effects of aging (such as decrease in vision,... Read More


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    Quote from A.B.123
    There is an issue going on at health care facilities about nurses who are still working as nurses well into their 60's and 70's. Assuming everyone ages differently, consider the effects of aging (such as decrease in vision, hearing, unsteady gait, ect.) do you think they put their patients and themselves at risk for injury? If so do you think there should be a mandatory retirement age for nurses?
    Not sure where you are going with this, but it smacks of ageism.

    Any nurse should be evaluated on her PERFORMANCE, not her/his age.

    I am in my forties, and need glasses. A friend of mine, a psychologist, wears a hearing aid.

    You are prob in your twenties to pose this question.

    I know some great surgeons in their sixties and seventies. How long did Michael DeBakey work before he retired?

    Most nurses retire themselves by sixties, and prob only a few work til in their seventies.

    Management assessing EVERY nurse on their performance. 'Nuff said.
    HazelLPN, OCNRN63, LockportRN, and 6 others like this.
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    Back to the original poster: where do you see this "issue" and what specific examples can you provide?
    loriangel14, elkpark, tnmarie, and 5 others like this.
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    Hahaha oopS!

    Maybe OP wanted to write an essay about it for school. I'll assume she meant that an aging nurse population isn't a problem so much as it is an "issue" in the sense that it's a recognizable trend.

    I, for one, am grateful that they're sticking around. I'll take a deaf, blind RN with 40+ years of experience over a new grad any day!
    HazelLPN, OCNRN63, and loriangel14 like this.
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    I don't think it will really big a big problem if they work on their 60's or 70's!They are already wise enough to thik of their patient's welfare anyway, being nurses for so many years! Another thing is, there are a lot of fields in nursing which does not really require physical strength
    HazelLPN and OCNRN63 like this.
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    If facilities kept appropriate staff levels and equipment (lift equipment) aging wouldn't be an issue.
    OCNRN63 likes this.
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    I think it's a veiled, "Old nurses need to retire so new grads can get jobs."
    HazelLPN, CapeCodMermaid, OCNRN63, and 7 others like this.
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    Quote from Vespertinas
    Hahaha oopS!

    Maybe OP wanted to write an essay about it for school. I'll assume she meant that an aging nurse population isn't a problem so much as it is an "issue" in the sense that it's a recognizable trend.

    I, for one, am grateful that they're sticking around. I'll take a deaf, blind RN with 40+ years of experience over a new grad any day!
    I don't know about that. I followed an experienced nurse with 32 years on-the-job who was not very proficient with computers and didn't see the Sepsis Alert notification form because she says she's "old school" and doesn't use the computer much. The patient ended up being transfered to ICU with a bp of 64/22 at shift change.

    Not saying that all experienced nurses are like that though.

    I think that we need to look at the individual for how well they are doing their job and not how much experience they have or how old they are. Experience and/or age don't necessarily correlate with competence.
    A.B.123, Fiona59, tnmarie, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from A.B.123
    There is an issue going on at health care facilities about nurses who are still working as nurses well into their 60's and 70's. Assuming everyone ages differently, consider the effects of aging (such as decrease in vision, hearing, unsteady gait, ect.) do you think they put their patients and themselves at risk for injury? If so do you think there should be a mandatory retirement age for nurses?
    Welcome to AN!

    This sounds like a school assignment.

    We are happy to help with homework but we will not do it for you....what do you think about this? Start the dialog and we will be happy to help.
    Fiona59, loriangel14, tnmarie, and 1 other like this.
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    Quote from whitecat5000
    I don't know about that. I followed an experienced nurse with 32 years on-the-job who was not very proficient with computers and didn't see the Sepsis Alert notification form because she says she's "old school" and doesn't use the computer much. The patient ended up being transferred to ICU with a bp of 64/22 at shift change.

    Not saying that all experienced nurses are like that though.

    I think that we need to look at the individual for how well they are doing their job and not how much experience they have or how old they are. Experience and/or age don't necessarily correlate with competence.
    So....you believe that the nurse not going on the computer and seeing an alert caused the patient to get sepsis?

    That just isn't the case. Not seeing a form did not cause that patients sepsis. I agree that age doesn't assure competence...nor does years in the profession guarantee competence.

    If hospitals had real pension plans you might find more nurses willing to retire. With the bad economy they can't retire. I have 34 years in the profession. I have been a nurse since I was 18 years old. I am computer literate and have extensive experience. If you are not in my age bracket it is easy to say make them retire......but there are many nurses like me who maybe over 50 but have teenagers.

    Agesim exists in nursing already it just isn't talked about.
    HazelLPN, A.B.123, OCNRN63, and 3 others like this.
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    Quote from wooh
    I think it's a veiled, "Old nurses need to retire so new grads can get jobs."
    Not very veiled....I think it's homework
    GrnTea, Fiona59, NutmeggeRN, and 5 others like this.


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