QUESTION TO ANSWER

  1. 0
    WELCOME :CAN YOU HELP Question CASE ABOUT ETHICS
    YOU are nurse and apart of healthcare team and your patient comes from a culture in which it is considered wrong to tell patients that they are dying .you are unclear how to respond to a Family's request to conceal the truth from a dying patient
    Question
    GUIDED BY PALESTINIAN NURSES CODE OF ETHICS, HOW CAN YOU SOLVE THIS PROBLEM MENTIONING THE INFLUENCES OF THE CODE IN SOLVING THE PROBLEM
    Last edit by Esme12 on Sep 27, '13 : Reason: formatting/font
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  3. 15 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I am not sure how we can help.....most of us are in the US.....do you have link to the Palestinian code of ethics? How do you think you would/should solve the problem?
  5. 0
    can help for question
  6. 0
    I can't help....I do not know the code of ethics of Palestine nurses
  7. 0
    Quote from Esme12
    I can't help....I do not know the code of ethics of Palestine nurses

    ok,,

    what about your code

    how you will do in this condition here according your code
  8. 0
    Quote from sama alghad

    ok,,

    what about your code

    how you will do in this condition here according your code
    We don't have a code like that in the US; although we are respectful to different cultures, our respect of the patient that may actively dying has a right to know and make decisions based on that; we cannot go along with the family just because they don't want the patient to know. If the patient has an underlying medical cause where they are not able to understand, there may be a different approach, however, the patient has the right to know.
  9. 0
    First off it is the doctor not the nurse who gives this news. Just like giving results of a test we do not do it. As far as the rest you take care of the pt and family as well. Will respecting family wishes harm pt or put them in discomfort? They don't want it told I will not tell , but they better have a DNR signed or we will be discussing DNR and what having vs not having one means.
    Last edit by nowim clean on Sep 28, '13 : Reason: misspelling
  10. 0
    Quote from sama alghad
    ok,,

    what about your code

    how you will do in this condition here according your code
    Unless the patient has a medical condition which makes him/her unable to comprehend what is going on, there's no way the family would know the prognosis before the patient. And a terminal prognosis would, as others have stated, be shared with the patient by the MD, not the nurse. It would be unethical and illegal to approach the grown child of a cognitively intact adult and say "Sue, your mother's CT shows that she has a terminal cancer. What would you like us to do?"
  11. 0
    If a patient or family member asked us about diagnostic results or prognoses, we would probably also seek further information first. "What has your doctor told you?" "Can you tell me what you think about how you are doing?"
  12. 0
    Quote from GrnTea
    If a patient or family member asked us about diagnostic results or prognoses, we would probably also seek further information first. "What has your doctor told you?" "Can you tell me what you think about how you are doing?"
    My least favorite position to be in as a hospital nurse was always knowing the (bad) results of a test and having the parents ask over and over "are the results back yet?" before the MD arrived to share them. I was once caring for a child with a long (nearly life long) history of a brain tumor who we thought was just going to have a post-op MRI before we transferred him to rehab... as it turns out this MRI revealed that his tumor was rapidly progressing and had spread throughout his brain and spine, his ventricular system was completely blocked and he had clots in every major vessel in his brain. I read that report and knew that this was the end and the inpatient team didn't want anyone but the child's primary oncologist to share the results with the family. I was in and out of that room probably a dozen times with the parents asking "have the MRI results come back yet?" before the doctor finally arrived.

    I hate the prognoses questions too. Currently have a young child with a diagnosis that is nearly 100% fatal. She had an MRI a few months ago that demonstrated several new tumors despite the fact that she'd been on continuous treatment. After learning this, her Mom asked me over and over "do you think there is no hope at all?" That honestly is what I think (and if it were my child, I think I would terminate treatment and take her home/try to enjoy the last few months) but the medical team is offering them clinical trials and experimental treatment and they are choosing to pursue those options so I honor that choice and keep my mouth shut. Clinically the child is well appearing and she is tolerating her current trial. The family has been told the honest truth (less than 10% of children survive this particular type of tumor) but, like any family in this position, they believe that their child will be in that 10%.


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