PLEASE paper due-Nursing student- 5minute Questionairre 6?'s- gender stereotypes?

  1. Hi Thanks for taking the time to read this....I am a nursing student trying to write a paper on a proffesional practice issue.This questionalire will be compared to a research article
    1) Do you think gender sterotypes still exist? if so explain....
    2)Do you think male nurses have an advantage or disadvantage in connecting to patients? if so explain....
    3) Do you think gender plays a role in relationships with physicians? if so explain...
    4) Do you agree or disagree with the statement male nurses possess better leadership abilities than females? if so explain...
    5) do you think men have increased performance pressure than females? explain...
    6) What do you think is the biggest barrier contributing to the low number of men in this proffession? explain....

    Thankyou for your time......it is much appreciated. This is totally confidential. I will compare the your proffessional answers to the research article.
    Last edit by daze on Sep 25, '05
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  2. 25 Comments

  3. by   SeekUrBliss
    Quote from daze
    Hi Thanks for taking the time to read this....I am a nursing student trying to write a paper on a proffesional practice issue.This questionalire will be compared to a research article
    1) Do you think gender sterotypes still exist? if so explain....
    2)Do you think male nurses have an advantage or disadvantage in connecting to patients? if so explain....
    3) Do you think gender plays a role in relationships with physicians? if so explain...
    4) Do you agree or disagree with the statement male nurses possess better leadership abilities than females? if so explain...
    5) do you think men have increased performance pressure than females? explain...
    6) What do you think is the biggest barrier contributing to the low number of men in this proffession? explain....

    Thankyou for your time......it is much appreciated. This is totally confidential. I will compare the your proffessional answers to the research article.


    my replies:

    1. I do think gender stereotypes still exist- but in my opinion, its an "age" thing. We have 4 very good male nurses in our unit. I have had several of my geriatric patients say something negative about it. Wierd to me!
    2. No
    3. Sadly, yes i do. Male nurses seem to get a little more respect from the Dr's. Again- wierd but true.
    4. I do not agree with that statement- i've seen both sexes function very well in the leadership role.
    5. Not really- altho we do "use" the guys occasionally when lifting help is needed etc.
    6. Maybe cause they think they don't look so masculine being a nurse? I really don't have a clue though since i am a female


    Hope my replies help--- they're just my opinions


    Peace
  4. by   flaerman
    Hi Daze,

    1) No I don't, have been an RN for 20 yrs and there was a little when I was in
    school.

    2) No again. I have related well to my patients regardless of whatever
    setting that I have worked in previously as well as currently simply due to
    having excellent people skills and being able to make a rapid assessment of
    my patients so I know how I need to speak to them. I believe a truly
    necessary component of being a good nurse is quickly figure out your pt's
    so you can "talk the talk and walk the walk" whether they are PhD level or
    average people to the common street junkie. I don't think this a is a
    gender based issue and can be accomplished by all of us.

    3) Yes to a point because the majority of physician's tend to be male so the
    "good old boy" thingy does play into it. Also some of the foreign born docs
    come from countries where there already exists a male holier than female
    type culture. The best way to become noticed by the docs is to be very
    good at your job, care about your pt's, and show them you are a part of
    their healthcare team to effectively treat their patients.

    4) Not necessarily, during my career I worked for both men and women in
    leadership positions that some are very good at leadership and sore are
    sorely lacking. Leadership is an aquired trait that comes through exper-
    ience and patience, sometimes one needs a little trial and error when first
    in a leadership role to what works and what doesn't. Number rule is to
    remember what your title is and to maintain enough of a seperation so as
    to not let your friendship/kinship with your staff to allow yourself to be
    swayed from doing what needs to be done, when it needs to be done. As
    an Administrative Nursing Supervisor I have great rapport with pretty much
    everyone at work and have been approached in situations where someone
    wants you to "hook them up"(have been asked to allow staff into medical
    records on a weekend to look at their charts, or allow another co-worker
    to use their computer accesses-all of which are unethical and disallowed
    at most facilities).

    5) Am not sure what you asking as to increased performance pressure, being
    a nurse(and male) should have no more increased performance pressure
    than being female. The only performance pressure there should for all of
    us is;
    -am I doing my job correctly and to the best of my ability?
    -am I practicing safely and within my accepted scope of practice?
    -am I treating my patients with caring and dignity that they deserve?
    -am I capable of doing my job?
    -am I maintaining the professionalism that goes along with my title?
    If any of the above are not possible or acheivable than you need to not be
    doing the job and defaming the good name and practice of being a "Nurse"
    and need to go away before you hurt someone.

    6) Maybe it depends on how a guy was raised or grew up, for me I grew up
    hanging out on street-corners with gang-fights, stealing, the whole nine
    yards and saw a need to want to help out my fellow man before we all kill
    each other and become as extinct as the dinosaurs are. Maybe if nursing
    salaries came up to better standards it would help, since programmers can
    make a whole more money and not have with some of what we as nurses
    have to deal with. Aslo it might help to get more people out into the
    middle and high schools of this counrty(currently Johnson & Johnson Co is
    encouraging this here in the US and even providing free materials to enable
    us to do so) to bring nursing out to the students. Get more nurses to work
    in the schools that have Medical/Nursing type programs and get these kids
    involved(active programs in the HS here in Central Florida), and more of
    current male nurses involved in mentoring students and new nurses.

    Well, sorry if I got too long-winded on any of my answers but after 20 yrs on the job I can't think of anything else I'd have ever wanted to do or trade any of my experiences for anything in the world. I am what I am, "a Nurse".....

    Paul P Ayres RN/flaerman
  5. by   papawjohn
    Hey Daze

    I don't think you'll find too much disagreement among us here. The individual differences might have more to do with different views than strictly gender differences. Like, for some of my older male Pt's it seems to make it easier for us to relate because I'm a veteran. I 'spose that's a gender related thing, but....well, you see where I'm going I hope. Anyhow.....

    1. Yes, women are still generally safer to express emotions to but less likely to get technical questions.

    2. As I said above, for some Pt's their nurse's gender makes a difference. I've thought that I had a GREAT connection with several little-old-lady Pts, only to see their face light up like a 100watt light when they see the next shift is a female nurse. The reverse is also true. But I doubt there is any over-all superiority/inferiority based on gender.

    3. Relating to Physicians is easier if you can speak their language. The 'Medical Model' is based scientific and data-based. To be honest, I think most men are likely to fit into that than most women.

    4. No. I think leadership is learned and altho styles of leadership may differ by gender there are good & bad leaders of both genders.

    5. The expectations may differ but I don't think men feel greater pressure to succeed than women. I think it's more likely that men will want to know the way the equipt works or why the lab results shape up the way they do and that women will understand the Pt's family situation, anxiety, etc. (I hurry up to say---both are important, and maybe the 'female side' is more important--there's lots of Bio-Engineering and Lab interpretation help available but sometimes not so much help with personal or family dynamics.)

    5. At the time I began, it was usual to expect a male nurse to be gay. I think at least then that was a barrier. The greater acceptance of gay/lesbian people in the general culture might make it easier today--but I expect that its still a barrier for lots of young straight men.

    GoodLuck
    Papaw John
  6. by   daze
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hi Thanks for taking the time to read this....I am a nursing student trying to write a paper on a proffesional practice issue.This questionalire will be compared to a research article
    1) Do you think gender sterotypes still exist? if so explain....
    2)Do you think male nurses have an advantage or disadvantage in connecting to patients? if so explain....
    3) Do you think gender plays a role in relationships with physicians? if so explain...
    4) Do you agree or disagree with the statement male nurses possess better leadership abilities than females? if so explain...
    5) do you think men have increased performance pressure than females? explain...
    6) What do you think is the biggest barrier contributing to the low number of men in this proffession? explain....

    Thankyou for your time......it is much appreciated. This is totally confidential. I will compare the your proffessional answers to the research article.
  7. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Hi Thanks for taking the time to read this....I am a nursing student trying to write a paper on a professional practice issue. This questionnaire will be compared to a research article

    1) Do you think gender stereotypes still exist? If so explain....

    Yes. In nursing - it's getting better. I can remember 13 yrs ago getting 'the look'. Not so much now. I can remember a nurse during clinicals in school giving me much grief and when I asked what her problem was she stated "It's you men. You ignore our profession until you think there's money to be had and now you're a bunch of scavengers. I'll have none of it." But my coworkers (and society) are used to more men in nursing now. However, see the concurrent thread about women being 'catty' if you want to explore current gender 'stereotypes'.

    In society at large - of course stereotypes exist. They serve to protect our own realms. There are good stereotypes and bad stereotypes. For the good stereotypes to remain protective - they have to 'adapt with the times' so to speak. And stereotypes are adapting. We've gone from women belong in the home to, in some elements, women that stay home aren't being true to themselves. And now a backlash. From a longer range of the timeline, we've gone from 'children are the heirs of men and so belong with them' to 'mom is the best parental unit' back now towards a balance. If you look at society, we tend to fluctuate between liberal and conservative politics. My parents were liberal, I'm not. The last several elections have gone conservative, the several before that were not. And it'll come around again. Like a pendulum, it is the swings that provide balance.

    2)Do you think male nurses have an advantage or disadvantage in connecting to patients? if so explain....

    Depends. Some patients, like young female psych patients - I'm at an extreme disadvantage and avoid these patients when possible. Usually, I trade w/ co-workers that are more than willing to let me take the next 6'2" 350 pt in DTs from Alcohol Withdrawal. I get my co-workers to help w/ things like foleys for younger females and in return, I do the same for younger males (they aren't as uncomfortable as female pts w/ the opposite sex placing a foley - actually some are MORE uncomfortable w/ a male doing it - but the female nurses I work w/ tend to be more comfortable not doing so.) There are some tradeoffs. I think one of the reasons I become very good at IV sticks is to have something to barter (I've started the last 5 difficult sticks for you, now I need a favor from you).

    I'm at a disadvantage if I wish to work in L&D and PP, etc. People tend to think 'You don't belong there.' And this may be controversial - but I'm at a disadvantage in nursing leadership for 2 reasons: female managers tend to hold on to the idea that this is one realm where they can (and should) be the leaders. And administrators tend to hold the belief that women in nursing leadership are more pliable. But I'd never be a nurse manager precisely because I don't think I'd be cut out to take ultimatums from management very well.

    I think men tend to be more assertive and I think that serves nursing well. If you look men tend to be in more assertive areas of nursing: ER, CCU, OR - I work in CCU (Critical Care not Coronary Care - Apparently ICU is a passe term).

    3) Do you think gender plays a role in relationships with physicians? if so explain...

    As a male nurse, I am at an advantage with dealing w/ docs, etc. - many of which, if I demonstrate adequate skill, think something along the lines of 'shame you didn't go to medical school'. I can remember in nursing school a doc asking me a question that I didn't even know what he was asking me. My PHd female instructor tried to answer and was told 'I DIDN'T ASK YOU!'. Several of my male co-workers are on a first name basis with most doc. I choose not to go there - they deserve their title. I have been known to call docs at 3am because it doesn't bother me as much as some of my female coworkers.

    Male doctors tend to see me more as colleagues. Female docs are so into trying to overcome their own reality of stereotypes among physician peers they don't realize how pervasive those stereotypes are and how they affect their relationships with male nurses. And female doctors, as a result, can be harder on female nurses "I went to medical school to advance the female image - you succumbed to the prevailing image." And this board is full of threads about the inherent stereotypes of Male Doc/Female Nurse. Look at TV - the nurses are all either background characters of love interests for the docs. Indeed, many people posit that the prevailing stereotypes of knowing your place as a nurse are throwbacks to another century.

    Suzanne Gordon argues in her book, "Nursing Against the Odds" that one of the reasons nursing became a female dominated profession was that docs, trying to establish their own niche in the early 1900s as a science-based profession, intentionally chose partners that reinforced their hierarchy. Or something to that effect.

    4) Do you agree or disagree with the statement male nurses possess better leadership abilities than females? if so explain...

    I think our prevailing stereotypes make men more assertive. If men are assertive, they are leaders. If women are, they are _______ (OK, you know this one, you fill in the blank.)

    5) do you think men have increased performance pressure than females? explain...

    Not in nursing. If anything, I have less. My motives and actions are not questioned nearly as often as my female counterparts. It leaves for a higher level of 'security' in my position.

    6) What do you think is the biggest barrier contributing to the low number of men in this profession? explain....

    It's a girly job. Again, prevailing stereotypes. My kids routinely tell their friends that their dad is a doc. (I correct that if presented to me.)

    But this is changing. In 1978, the ave RN salary was 8000/yr. In the 2 parent worker scheme where the man feels obligated to be the 'breadwinner' this was not the job the man took. That's changing. The public is beginning to think of us as very well paid - hence the waiting lists for school. Girly job or not, I support 3 kids at my own house AND pay a very sizable amount of child support on my salary. That is convincing logic.

    I was bumped straight into a program with a 2 yr waiting list in 1991. My instructors were very clear that they took all qualified male applicants immediately. Their rationale was quite pragmatic - like it or not, pay and prestige will go up as the percentage of men go up.

    And in the process, nursing will be redefined. I cringe at hinting to docs so they can 'discover' what I already know. I'm straightforward. I don't start my conversation to a doc with: 'he's breathing harder and his sats are dropping and his lungs are wet.' I say: 'he's going into CHF, I want to give 80 of lasix.' The docs that don't know me and aren't used to straightforward assessments will ask the follow-up questions that lead to the objective observations mentioned above. The docs that do know me will say, 'Ok'. In my opinion, every answer of 'Ok' advances nursing as a profession. That's why I give my DIAGNOSIS first and leave it to them to ask the follow-ups.

    Thank you for your time......it is much appreciated. This is totally confidential. I will compare the your professional answers to the research article.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Sep 25, '05
  8. by   canoehead
    Try doing a search of "male nurses" with our search function. The OB forum has some interesting threads too.
  9. by   Corvette Guy
    IMHO, this Thread would receive a bigger response if moved to the Male Nurse section. Anyway, here's my .02 ...

    1) Do you think gender stereotypes still exist? If so explain....

    Yes, I think so. However, not to the degree 15-20 years ago. It does :angryfire when an ignorant redneck thinks all Male RNs are gay. I know alot of Male RNs that are not gay. Its none of my business what particular sexual preference a male nurse may have, however its those flaming male nurses that give male [heterosexual] nurses a bad reputation.

    2)Do you think male nurses have an advantage or disadvantage in connecting to patients? if so explain....

    No... IMHO, it depends on the patient. I've seen the same patient bond with one female nurse better than another female nurse, as well as bond better with one male nurse better than another.

    3) Do you think gender plays a role in relationships with physicians? if so explain...

    Yes & No ... Again, it depends on the physician. I'd say overall its 50/50.

    4) Do you agree or disagree with the statement male nurses possess better leadership abilities than females? if so explain...

    Nursing leadership is definitely a unique skill. I've not seen enough Male RNs in a nursing leadership role compared to the majority of female nurses I've seen. However, so far I'd say the males have done better in the leadership role. Nonetheless, I'll have to say the jury is still deliberating before I make I final decision.

    5) Do you think men have increased performance pressure than females? explain...

    No, [your referring to nursing, right? :chuckle ] actually I wonder if some of the female nurses may feel added work related nursing skilled performance pressure when faced with the some of the male physician's w/"good ole boy mentally"?

    6) What do you think is the biggest barrier contributing to the low number of men in this profession? explain....

    The field of nursing is thought of has a feminine profession, just like the field of medicine is thought of as a "man's job". These barriers are slowly coming down. A higher percentage of Male RNs exsist in the military [33%], compared to civilian [< 8%]. Someday, the civilian percentage of Male RNs will be higher when the boys in grade school become more educated to the fact that they can look at nursing as a career option w/o fear of any labels. Most [not all] Male RNs gravitate towards the technical side of nursing; Critical Care Unit, ER Dept., OR & Anesthesia Nursing. If, more pre-teen males were informed of these technical areas in nursing, then maybe more would be inclined to consider a career in nursing. *BTW, I'm not saying males do better than females in these technical areas of nursing... just that most males in nursing seem to be in these technical areas compared to Med-Surg, LTC facilities, etc.























































    On a side note, yet related...
    IMHO this Smilie --->sux, and should be removed from allnurses.com Smilies, ASAP.

    Obviously, this icon is gender bias against male nurses, and degrades the nursing profession in general. That icon reflects a time when nurses were more like servants to MDs, rather than today's more autonomous nursing environment. Just my .02
    Last edit by Cary, Male RN on Sep 25, '05
  10. by   jsteine1
    [QUOTE=daze]--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    1) Do you think gender sterotypes still exist? if so explain....
    Yes, unfortunately, I do. As the general populatuion is ageing, the majority of employed and hospitalized people are in their 40's to 70's. some of the old stereotypes with respect to profession continue. The meet the Fokkers movies made the point. There was something considered "wrong" about a male RN. Stupid, but unfortunately not so unusual.
    2)Do you think male nurses have an advantage or disadvantage in connecting to patients? if so explain...."" an advantage. Again, the older patient population connects maleness to physician, make voice holding more authority than female etc.
    3) Do you think gender plays a role in relationships with physicians? if so explain... Yes, male bonding prevails- a little chat about sports then talk about the patient.
    4) Do you agree or disagree with the statement male nurses possess better leadership abilities than females? if so explain... No, studies have proven that females are better managers statistically due to socialized traits inherent to women, Ie emotional intelligence skill sets. Not just my opinion, but published in many business journals over the last 7 years.
    5) do you think men have increased performance pressure than females? explain... NO.
    6) What do you think is the biggest barrier contributing to the low number of men in this proffession? explain.... See # 1- not in my lifetime, but the baby boomers are the larger % of the population now and growing. The younger generations do not stereotype as readily as those born in the 40's and 50's. The times they are a' changin';but slowly
  11. by   Corvette Guy
    [QUOTE=jsteine1]
    Quote from daze
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    1) Do you think gender sterotypes still exist? if so explain....
    Yes, unfortunately, I do. As the general populatuion is ageing, the majority of employed and hospitalized people are in their 40's to 70's. some of the old stereotypes with respect to profession continue. The meet the Fokkers movies made the point. There was something considered "wrong" about a male RN. Stupid, but unfortunately not so unusual.
    2)Do you think male nurses have an advantage or disadvantage in connecting to patients? if so explain...."" an advantage. Again, the older patient population connects maleness to physician, make voice holding more authority than female etc.
    3) Do you think gender plays a role in relationships with physicians? if so explain... Yes, male bonding prevails- a little chat about sports then talk about the patient.
    4) Do you agree or disagree with the statement male nurses possess better leadership abilities than females? if so explain... No, studies have proven that females are better managers statistically due to socialized traits inherent to women, Ie emotional intelligence skill sets. Not just my opinion, but published in many business journals over the last 7 years.
    5) do you think men have increased performance pressure than females? explain... NO.
    6) What do you think is the biggest barrier contributing to the low number of men in this proffession? explain.... See # 1- not in my lifetime, but the baby boomers are the larger % of the population now and growing. The younger generations do not stereotype as readily as those born in the 40's and 50's. The times they are a' changin';but slowly
    1) I agree, valid point with the movie & how the media [for the most part] are keeping nursing in the dark ages with male gender stereotyping.

    2) Maybe so, yet the geri-female patients sometimes would rather have a female nurse.

    3) :chuckle Sure maybe a little male bonding btwn male nurses & physicians exsists, yet I would not say it dominates. However, I see ALOT of female nurses get away with favoritism by using the "flirting card", if you get my drift.

    4) PROOF... i.e. site some sources, please. BTW, you posted business journals, right? Well, how about nursing journals w/articles written by both females & males in regard to males vs. female leadership in nursing management.

    5) Yep

    6) So, you think the media is the culprit to the biggest barrier contributing to the low number of males in nursing, or d/t those born in the 1950's [and older] that stereotype, or both? If so, then I'd agree with you, too.

    You may not give a darn whether I agree, or not with you. I'm bored and just trying to keep this Thread alive.

    BTW, [Sept. 30th is right around the proverbial corner. :hatparty:
    Last edit by Cary, Male RN on Sep 25, '05
  12. by   jsteine1
    [QUOTE=Cary, Male RN]
    Quote from jsteine1
    1) I agree, valid point with the movie & how the media [for the most part] are keeping nursing in the dark ages with male gender stereotyping.

    2) Maybe so, yet the geri-female patients sometimes would rather have a female nurse.

    3) :chuckle Sure maybe a little male bonding btwn male nurses & physicians exsists, yet I would not say it dominates. However, I see ALOT of female nurses get away with favoritism by using the "flirting card", if you get my drift.

    4) PROOF... i.e. site some sources, please. BTW, you posted business journals, right? Well, how about nursing journals w/articles written by both females & males in regard to males vs. female leadership in nursing management.

    5) Yep

    6) So, you think the media is the culprit to the biggest barrier contributing to the low number of males in nursing, or d/t those born in the 1950's [and older] that stereotype, or both? If so, then I'd agree with you, too.

    You may not give a darn whether I agree, or not with you. I'm bored and just trying to keep this Thread alive.

    BTW, [Sept. 30th is right around the proverbial corner. :hatparty:
    Thank you for the BD wishes... I do care about your opinion, thats why I respond and welcome reactions. Makes it all the more fun. RE: 6- I think its both but more so to the socialization of the largest, wealthiest and most influential portion of our population today. I reference business books and business journals. sorry to say, I dont read too many nursing journals. Been in exec mgmt of health care businesses for 30 years. My observations may not be at the DON level or something like that, but what I've read about the VP, CEO, COO levels, women have better retention of key personnell and in similar circumstances, higher performance. Sorry, cant quote at the moment, but the general thinking is out there about female/male managerial styles. Again, due to socialization, males( generally speaking) manage in a somewhat detached manner, are more autocratic in approach and struggle with the single parent issues that are so prevalent today in terms of flexible scheduling, time off, leaves, etc. In most settings, as it mirrors the population, the workforce is largely female. Females favor, again to early role modeling and norms, participative management, consensus building. Assuming the females also have powerful strategic and critical thinking abilities, thats a winning combination. This is absolutely NOT stated to down play male managerial approaches, it is simply personal professional observation in several corporate healthcare settings. Personally, the toughest and best bosses I ever had were men.
  13. by   ZASHAGALKA
    [QUOTE=Cary, Male RN]
    Quote from jsteine1
    2) Maybe so, yet the geri-female patients sometimes would rather have a female nurse.
    It never fails to surprise me just how untrue this statement becomes as time moves on.

    The following is a typical comment from older female patients: "Once I got used to male nurses, I like you guys better; y'all treat me like your grandmothers, the female nurses treat me like just another patient."

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  14. by   jsteine1
    Another thought on this subject:

    In recent years, the "Voice on Hold" messages so common in most businesses have been changed from a male voice to a female voice. Credit card companies= changed to female voices. Many health care businesses=female voice. Banks/financial/investment institutions:male voice. Interesting stuff.

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