Pathophysiology of UTI/septicemia

  1. I need Help!
    does anyone knew the phathophysiology of septicemia in a UTI patient?
    •  
  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   EricJRN
    I moved your post to its own thread. Good luck to you.
  4. by   UM Review RN
    This link might be a little complex, but I found it very helpful:

    http://www.sepsis.com/media/microcirculation_video.html


    This link has a lot of information:

    http://www.kidneyatlas.org/book2/adk2_07.pdf
    Last edit by UM Review RN on Dec 18, '07
  5. by   Daytonite
    hi, bnzhd, and welcome to allnurses!

    the basic pathophysiology is that once bacteria enter the bladder, local defense mechanisms in the bladder break down and the bacteria invade the bladder mucosa and begin to multiply. the bacteria that have lodged in the mucosa cannot be eliminated by urination. inflammation also occurs; it is the general response to any bacterial invasion which results in vascular permeability. because of the vascular permeability, bacteria that have invaded the bladder mucosa are able to escape into the blood stream and this is the actual start of septicemia. once the bacteria enters the blood stream they release endotoxins and the symptoms of bacteremia are produced.

    also see. . .the pathophysiology of the inflammation response on this thread: http://allnurses.com/forums/f50/hist...ct-244836.html
    Last edit by Daytonite on Jan 31, '08
  6. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from Daytonite
    Hi, bnzhd, and welcome to allnurses!

    The basic pathophysiology is that once bacteria enter the bladder, local defense mechanisms in the bladder break down and the bacteria invade the bladder mucosa and begin to multiply. The bacteria that have lodged in the mucosa cannot be eliminated by urination. Inflammation also occurs; it is the general response to any bacterial invasion which results in vascular permeability. Because of the vascular permeability, bacteria that have invaded the bladder mucosa are able to escape into the blood stream and this is the actual start of septicemia. Once the bacteria enters the blood stream they release endotoxins and the symptoms of bacteremia are produced.
    You said it so much better than I could've. Thanks!
  7. by   Daytonite
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    You said it so much better than I could've. Thanks!
    Ha! Ha! I actually used three different resources. Some of it I had to pull out of two different sections of Pathophysiology: The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children, third edition, by Kathryn L. McCance and Sue E. Heuther and then turn it into "easy reading".

close